Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 9356791 times)

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Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63020 on: March 11, 2016, 05:08:38 AM »
Chopin's Preludes



From this:

It's all good...

Offline NikF

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63021 on: March 11, 2016, 05:31:57 AM »
Ravel: Rhapsodie espagnole and Introduction and Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet, and Strings - Martinon/CSO.

Staying with the box to enjoy a couple of performances of Ravel, particularly the Introduction and Allegro - full, warm and beautiful.
"You overestimate my power of attraction," he told her. "No, I don't," she replied sharply, "and neither do you".

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63022 on: March 11, 2016, 05:53:06 AM »
Ravel: Rhapsodie espagnole and Introduction and Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet, and Strings - Martinon/CSO.

Staying with the box to enjoy a couple of performances of Ravel, particularly the Introduction and Allegro - full, warm and beautiful.

Exquisite pieces.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63023 on: March 11, 2016, 07:03:15 AM »
CASELLA: Paganiniana, Suite from La Giara, Serenata
Svizzera Italiana Orch.,  Christian Benda, cond.
de FALLA: The Three-Cornered Hat, El Amor Brujo    both complete!
Montreal S.O.    Dutoit cond.
old favourites, worth an occasional repeat because I like them
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63024 on: March 11, 2016, 07:21:27 AM »
Tonight begins a five-day jaunt through Seattle and the Pacific Northwest with a gang of my best friends, and while I'm bringing some jazz, there won't be any classical listening. So today, gotta hit up some of my favorites and make sure the itch is good and scratched.

Starting with Oberon:



Mostly I'm posting about this, despite listening to only one track, because (1) the cover painting is fantastic, and (2) so's the performance. I love Antoni Wit's Weber overture disc too (also with a misty, mysterious cover). Hmmmm...time for comparison listening!!


Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63025 on: March 11, 2016, 07:36:31 AM »
Tonight begins a five-day jaunt through Seattle and the Pacific Northwest with a gang of my best friends, and while I'm bringing some jazz, there won't be any classical listening. So today, gotta hit up some of my favorites and make sure the itch is good and scratched.

Starting with Oberon:



Mostly I'm posting about this, despite listening to only one track, because (1) the cover painting is fantastic, and (2) so's the performance. I love Antoni Wit's Weber overture disc too (also with a misty, mysterious cover). Hmmmm...time for comparison listening!!


One track may not be enough for a solid comparison, but here are my notes:
- Griffiths has shrunk his WDR orchestra to chamber size, which pays off in the more intimate moments but, towards the end of the overture, exposes some less-than-gorgeous playing
- Wit's NZSO is at full size and while it's not as glorious as his Warsaw band, it's certainly very fine
- Griffiths's opening horn solo is perfect and uber-atmospheric, but the horn parts later on glare a bit, a sore thumb in the orchestral texture
- Wit's tendency to conduct things slowly is in evidence here (he has an extra minute) but it's not noticeably slow. The performance never drags; it has a total command of the work's structure
- CPO's sound is a bit better

Edge: Wit

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63026 on: March 11, 2016, 07:39:18 AM »
Now on to another masterpiece that opens with a horn solo. Serkin/Cleveland/Szell


Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63027 on: March 11, 2016, 07:40:25 AM »
One track may not be enough for a solid comparison, but here are my notes:
- Griffiths has shrunk his WDR orchestra to chamber size, which pays off in the more intimate moments but, towards the end of the overture, exposes some less-than-gorgeous playing
- Wit's NZSO is at full size and while it's not as glorious as his Warsaw band, it's certainly very fine
- Griffiths's opening horn solo is perfect and uber-atmospheric, but the horn parts later on glare a bit, a sore thumb in the orchestral texture
- Wit's tendency to conduct things slowly is in evidence here (he has an extra minute) but it's not noticeably slow. The performance never drags; it has a total command of the work's structure
- CPO's sound is a bit better

Edge: Wit

Tangentially, the EnnZedd band sound great in the Copland Third Symphony.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63028 on: March 11, 2016, 07:43:38 AM »



A-list recordings only today. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63029 on: March 11, 2016, 07:48:04 AM »
Starting with Oberon:

Good idea; I'll join you...Szell with the Cleveland in Tokyo




Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63030 on: March 11, 2016, 07:52:04 AM »
Good idea; I'll join you...Szell with the Cleveland in Tokyo



Did you photoshop in that Interview with Boulez, Sarge? Tell the truth, and shame the devil . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63031 on: March 11, 2016, 07:56:15 AM »
Now:





Listening to Kikimora. Such an enchanting work.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63032 on: March 11, 2016, 07:57:47 AM »
Now on to another masterpiece that opens with a horn solo. Serkin/Cleveland/Szell



Yes, I especially like the horn solo in op. 117/2. And much fancier cover art than the CBS copy I have of that performance. But I have to laugh at "the art of interpretation." When is the art of interpretation absent from any performance?

Bon voyage for your second trip in so many months, but before you depart I hope you will share your reactions to the German Requiem.
"I don't know what sforzando means, though it clearly means something."

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63033 on: March 11, 2016, 08:16:44 AM »
Did you photoshop in that Interview with Boulez, Sarge? Tell the truth, and shame the devil . . . .

 ;D :D ;D

Boulez conducted some of the concerts during that Asian tour. In the interview he reminisces about Szell and the tour.

Listening to the Mozart G minor now. A fabulous performance. Intensely dramatic first and fourth movements.




Sarge
« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 08:20:24 AM by Sergeant Rock »
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63034 on: March 11, 2016, 08:20:25 AM »
Did you photoshop in that Interview with Boulez, Sarge? Tell the truth, and shame the devil . . . .
Dang does that box look like necessary listening, Boulez or no Boulez.

When is the art of interpretation absent from any performance?
When it's HJ Lim playing Beethoven sonatas ;)

Bon voyage for your second trip in so many months, but before you depart I hope you will share your reactions to the German Requiem.
So much of it is achingly beautiful - and while I don't know the individual Bach cantatas, when you posted that mini-discussion about the similarities yesterday, it didn't altogether shock me. Certainly, this is a more conservative and calm Requiem than Dvorak's dramatic and ultra-romantic interpretation (to say nothing of a certain Italian). Brahms keeps his grief a little more buttoned-up. I do look forward to hearing it again soon, probably right after returning, but it is quite a time investment, especially since much of the music is pretty similar in tempo/dynamics.

I see it's kind of earlyish - to the extent that you can call the 1860s early for Brahms; he found his voice very quickly, which was the point I was going to make with this sentence before the structure fell apart.

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63035 on: March 11, 2016, 08:31:30 AM »
First-ever listen to this Pulitzer Prize winner: Caroline Shaw's Partita for 8 Singers.


Offline NikF

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63036 on: March 11, 2016, 08:35:47 AM »
Landowski: Symphony No. 2 - Martinon/ORTF.

My second time of listening and it's now revealing itself to be a piece of music that I find increasingly interesting.
"You overestimate my power of attraction," he told her. "No, I don't," she replied sharply, "and neither do you".

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63037 on: March 11, 2016, 08:37:07 AM »
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63038 on: March 11, 2016, 08:40:50 AM »
When it's HJ Lim playing Beethoven sonatas ;)

Touché, though I haven't yet had the honor and hope never to change that situation.

So much of it is achingly beautiful - and while I don't know the individual Bach cantatas, when you posted that mini-discussion about the similarities yesterday, it didn't altogether shock me. Certainly, this is a more conservative and calm Requiem than Dvorak's dramatic and ultra-romantic interpretation (to say nothing of a certain Italian). Brahms keeps his grief a little more buttoned-up. I do look forward to hearing it again soon, probably right after returning, but it is quite a time investment, especially since much of the music is pretty similar in tempo/dynamics.

I see it's kind of earlyish - to the extent that you can call the 1860s early for Brahms; he found his voice very quickly, which was the point I was going to make with this sentence before the structure fell apart.

I agree with that latter point, though the very early opus numbers tend to exhibit somewhat more diffuse and prolix writing than you find already in works like the first string sextet of op. 18 and the orchestral serenades. But you seem to be overlooking the fact that Brahms drew his German texts from the Lutheran Bible rather than the Roman Catholic requiem as used by Mozart, Cherubini, Berlioz, Dvorak, Britten, Stravinsky, and that certain Italian. (Even so, all those works interpret the more-or-less same Latin text very differently, including the quite gentle version by the quite gentle Fauré.)
"I don't know what sforzando means, though it clearly means something."

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #63039 on: March 11, 2016, 09:04:51 AM »
Trying to make a dent in this:



CD 19:
Bizet: Symphonie in C major; Jeux d'enfants Op. 22; La jolie fille de Perth, suite.
Offenbach: overtures Orphee aux enfers; La Belle Helene.

Q