Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 7432074 times)

Traverso and 18 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123340 on: October 22, 2018, 07:58:31 AM »
Purcell: The Fairy Queen, Acts 1-3 [Gardiner]





Refined and polished performances from Gardiner.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123341 on: October 22, 2018, 07:59:24 AM »
Morning listening (new arrival):


Q

I hope that you enjoyed that one Que.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123342 on: October 22, 2018, 08:02:30 AM »
Arrived today. I didn't know about this recording,until I came across it,two or three,days ago. The few reviews and comments available on the internet are positive. The New York Times calls it "excellent" (as opposed to the Keilberth,which is,"outstanding"). Lovro von Matačić is usually well regarded,and it has Gottlob Frick and Rudolf Schock,who I like. I enjoy the heroic ring to his style of singing (and timbre). The sound effects,including (quote,from,1989 Gramophone review)"an extraordinary rattle of approaching feathers followed by a loud thump" (when a bird is shot) and grunting boar (etc) sounded fun;so in the basket it went!! Gottlob Frick is on top form. Some fun,fiendish sounding,cackling! I haven't reached Cd 2,yet! But I'm,definitely,I'm liking what I'm hearing,so far! :)



I presume that you have the Keilberth version which is the only one that I own. Did you enjoy the Matačić version?
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline Biffo

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 681
  • Location: United Kingdom
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123343 on: October 22, 2018, 08:18:41 AM »
Purcell: The Fairy Queen, Acts 1-3 [Gardiner]





Refined and polished performances from Gardiner.

For years I relied on the Deller Consort on LP and could never make my mind up about buying a CD version. I kept on comparing Gardiner and Harnoncourt on Spotify without really liking either. On a whim I bought the Naxos release from The Scholar's Baroque Ensemble and it turned out to be a dud. Eventually I bought Harnoncourt and it is OK but not world-beating. More recently I bought the Anthony Lewis version when it was released by Australian Eloquence; Lewis is the nearest in style to my old favourite Deller.

I have a few excerpts from the Gardiner version, part of a Baroque compilation, but not enough to sway me either way. Perhaps I will have to give Gardiner another try.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123344 on: October 22, 2018, 08:23:29 AM »
For years I relied on the Deller Consort on LP and could never make my mind up about buying a CD version. I kept on comparing Gardiner and Harnoncourt on Spotify without really liking either. On a whim I bought the Naxos release from The Scholar's Baroque Ensemble and it turned out to be a dud. Eventually I bought Harnoncourt and it is OK but not world-beating. More recently I bought the Anthony Lewis version when it was released by Australian Eloquence; Lewis is the nearest in style to my old favourite Deller.

I have a few excerpts from the Gardiner version, part of a Baroque compilation, but not enough to sway me either way. Perhaps I will have to give Gardiner another try.

I would not rush into the Gardiner as I find the Harnoncourt more preferential. I know that these things are subjective but if you did not particularly favour the Harnoncourt you may not like the Gardiner at all. Then again you may love it. I would be curious to read your thoughts if you did stream the Gardiner.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline BPS

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 703
  • aka Judge Fish
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123345 on: October 22, 2018, 08:41:03 AM »
Handel: Your Tuneful Voice
Iestyn Davies, The King's Consort, Robert King
Vivat



Vivaldi: I Concerti di Dresda
Freiburger Barockorchester, Gottfried von der Goltz
Naive



Giordani: Six Sonatas
Marco Ruggeri & Lina Uinskyte
Brilliant



All recommended, as listed.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 08:57:05 AM by BPS »
"There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it." – Emmanuel Radnitzky (Man Ray)

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123346 on: October 22, 2018, 08:54:34 AM »
Strauss: Wind Serenade Op. 7 [Britten Sinfonia]





A short but very lyrical and beguiling work given a fine performance here. The balance in the textures is wonderful.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123347 on: October 22, 2018, 09:52:50 AM »
Rachmaninov: Symphony No. 3 [Ormandy]





I find the middle movement of No. 3 to be a particularly fine piece of writing.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Online Traverso

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1322
  • Location: The Netherlands
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123348 on: October 22, 2018, 10:52:51 AM »
De Leidse Koorboeken

Book V  CD 2


Offline BPS

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 703
  • aka Judge Fish
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123349 on: October 22, 2018, 11:19:21 AM »
Taking a big plunge into Carissimi.  Not gonna try to listen to all of these at once – combined they are over 13 hours of music.

Carissimi: Complete Motets of Arion Romanus
Ensemble Seicentonovecento & Flavio Colusso
Brilliant



Carissimi: Complete Oratorios
Ensemble Seicentonovecento & Flavio Colusso
Brilliant



I downloaded both of these from the dying embers of eMusic.com for about $5 total; but that's another story (the dying embers, that is).
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 02:44:51 PM by BPS »
"There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it." – Emmanuel Radnitzky (Man Ray)

Offline Brian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 20260
    • Brian's blog
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123350 on: October 22, 2018, 11:54:00 AM »


D. 960

Is this really the same Alexander Lonquich who delivered such scintillating, snappy, rhythmically alive work in the Schumann Kreisleriana? The D. 960 Lonquich is slow, full of pregnant pauses, all brooding and misty-eyed romanticism. This performance reminds me of some of Richter's interpretations of this work. Many people love Richter-style performances of D. 960. Sadly, I don't.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15553
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123351 on: October 22, 2018, 11:55:15 AM »
Rameau: Orchestral Suite: Nais [Bruggen]





This is charming and delightful music which is excellently played.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline listener

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 5976
  • Location: 604
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123352 on: October 22, 2018, 12:39:06 PM »
ROENTGEN (Julius)
Quintet for Piano and Strings op.100,  Trio for clarinet, viola and cello,
Sonata for Viola and Piano,  Sextet in G
Adolf BUSCH: String Sextet in G, op. 40   Walter BRAUNFELS: String Quintet in f#
Artists of the Royal Conservatory, Toronto
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Online Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10029
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123353 on: October 22, 2018, 01:13:27 PM »




Sadly, I don't.

That’s a shame.

Unlike Richter Lonquich articulates his vision

Quote
Schubert deliberately proceeds [in the first movement] as if groping his way along . . .  playing with the risk of losing the thread of the narrative.

I haven’t heard the 960 yet so I won’t comment, maybe tomorrow I’ll listen. What I will say is that I like the idea of almost losing narrative in Schubert - this is something which I’ve noticed in one or two other large scale Schubert keyboard works and it’s one of the things which makes me slightly interested in his music - I think it makes it more modern, less like Beethoven, more like Feldman.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 01:17:49 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Online Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10029
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123354 on: October 22, 2018, 08:38:38 PM »


D. 960

Is this really the same Alexander Lonquich who delivered such scintillating, snappy, rhythmically alive work in the Schumann Kreisleriana? The D. 960 Lonquich is slow, full of pregnant pauses, all brooding and misty-eyed romanticism. This performance reminds me of some of Richter's interpretations of this work. Many people love Richter-style performances of D. 960. Sadly, I don't.

What is this piano that he’s playing? It’s so well balanced, it sounds to me like one of those old Steinway pianos that Edwin Fischer recorded with. I can’t find any info in the booklet, and I’m not enough of a pianophile to identify it. I’m glad to have found a modern piano sound I can tolerate.

I listened to 960/I and I found it very thought provoking. It does seem to me to sound like what he wanted it to sound like - proceeding à tâtons towards nowhere, like Winterreise. This is new I think. You mentioned Richter and they both do indeed take the repeat and play slowly. However, although it’s a while since I heard it,  I don’t think Richter plays it with the same aimlessness as Lonquich.   Pace your comment, I see it as anti-romantic in fact, though I’m hardly very knowledgeable about C19 ideas. It made me think more of Beckett’s Happy Days, without the comedy.

The second movement seems to me to be equally valuable, he continues the aimlessness, and the  Winterreise thinking, and indeed he makes a connection to Der Lindenbaum in the booklet essay, which I thought was provocative.

 I haven’t heard the rest.

It’s not going to appeal to people who want a sweet fluid approach which moves forward at a good pace. Schubert may have suffered from the reputation of being essentially a songsmith.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 11:33:33 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15360
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123355 on: October 22, 2018, 09:44:16 PM »
Morning listening:


For their new album, Paul Van Nevel has selected outstanding works by Huguenot composers of the 16th century, a period when Protestants were ruthlessly persecuted in pre-revolutionary France. The tragic height of this persecution was the Saint Bartholomew’s Day massacre on the night of 23–24 August 1572, when the lives of thousands of Huguenots were taken. Despite the religious repression and persecution, a Protestant culture filled with musical riches was able to develop in France. This included psalm settings by various composers that are well worth being discovered and cover an impressive range of styles from homophonic to polyphonic motets encompassing many voice parts. For this album the Huelgas Ensemble has recorded the most interesting works of composers such as Claude Goudimel (1510–1572), Jaques Maudit (1557–1627), Giovanni da Palestrina (1525–1594), Pascal de l’Estocart (1539–1584) as well as Jean Servin (1530–1596) and Claude Le Jeune (1528–1600).

Not just the intense and sober music by French Huguenots. Van Nevel also includes three pieces that were part of the 1572 celebrations in Rome on the "good news" of the massacre of the French Protestant nobility in Paris...

Q
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 09:49:58 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

 

Don't Like These Ads? Become a GMG Subscriber!
For as little as 14 cents per day, subscribers get no advertising on the forum, a larger Inbox for your PM's, and a warm glow of knowing you are supporting the forum. All this and a groovy Subscriber badge too!
Click here to read more.