Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 6197515 times)

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Offline Turner

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113120 on: Today at 08:39:52 AM »
Various, mostly historical Janacek recordings in this CD box, including Haefliger in Diary of One Who Disappeared, 1954 recording, Talich in Taras Bulba; Bakala in Glagolithic Mass etc.

https://www.discogs.com/Leo%C5%A1-Jan%C3%A1%C4%8Dek-Meister-Der-Sprachmelodie-Master-Of-Intonation/release/6967529


The piano works with Kayahara were okayish, but not more than that, IMO.
« Last Edit: Today at 09:07:54 AM by Turner »

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113121 on: Today at 08:50:52 AM »
 
A recent purchase.  Sounds wonderful.  :)
[/quote]


Just ordered myself  :)


Offline North Star

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113122 on: Today at 08:53:44 AM »
;D ;D

Fixed...auto-correct often goes awry, churning out the bizarrest of phrases... >:D
I like the idea that the auto-correct assumes you mean to say 'dork' when you type work.  0:)

Thread-duty
Schubert
Zwei Scherzi, D593
Piano Sonata in C major 'Reliquie', D840
Jan Vermeulen
(fortepiano Nannette Streicher, Vienna 1825)

"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

My photographs on Flickr

Offline Spineur

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113123 on: Today at 09:04:06 AM »
Giving another spin to Liszt: Die heilige Legende von St Elizabeth



A nice work from the mature Liszt (he was 54 at the creation).  Not as many excess as in his symphonic poems and some lovely vocal parts.
A woman voice glides like the wind
Of black, of damp, of night
And all it touches in this flight
Suddenly is over.

Anna Akhomatova

Offline Christo

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  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113124 on: Today at 09:40:26 AM »
Czeslaw MAREK (1891-1985)
Suite for Orchestra op. 25   Méditations op. 14   Sinfonia op. 28
The Philharmonia Orchestra London     Gary Brain, cond.
Am discovering the Opuses 25 and 28 now, in the Guild lable release of the same recording, both pieces very convincing IMHO:
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Maestro267

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113125 on: Today at 09:45:08 AM »
Corigliano: A Dylan Thomas Trilogy
Allen (baritone), Jackson (boy soprano), Tessier (tenor)
Nashville Symphony Chorus and Orchestra/Slatkin

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113126 on: Today at 10:34:11 AM »


This is the first, original cd issue of this well-known recording. Subsequent reissues (3 if I count well) corrected what is an unforgivable editing idiocy: cutting the second act less than 5 minutes before the end, spilling over the 3rd disc. All 3 discs clock in around 72 minutes, so there was ample time to fit the rest of the act on the second cd. On the newer issues timings are 72, 77 and 68 minutes, with Act ends in their proper places.

Anyhow, as to the performance, I find it admirable for the conducting, playing and excellent engineering. None of the sung roles make it to the top rung, though. Thomas and Grümmer are both admirable and tasteful, but I looked in vain for a trace of the dramatic. Vocally they do not displace favourites such as Konya, Domingo, Steber or Janowitz. In a few places I thought someone should have given a Ricola to Thomas before opening up his mic.

King Henry is very well sung and portrayed by the veteran, Gottlob Frick. On the Warner sets, the back cover blurb commends Fischer-Dieskau and Ludwig for « subtly bringing new dimensions to the roles of the two villains of the piece». Well, I’m not sure what to make of that newfound subtlety. While DFD rages over his lost honour perfunctorily, the voice is so beautiful that it’s hard to envision him as the true scumbag he is supposed to portray. Similarly, Ludwig has no trouble singing beautiflly and forcefully, but where is the venom, the spite, the demonic rage of this hellish witch ? She is more believable when pretending to Elsa that she is a victim than when erupting in vengeful anger. No match for the real giants in this role, Varnay and Gorr.

All in all, a superb phonographic production that could have been markedly better if the singing had been one size larger and the characterization more effective.
« Last Edit: Today at 11:41:46 AM by André »

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113127 on: Today at 10:35:29 AM »
Afaik, Brahms himself transcribed them for the viola, so it's as legit as it gets.  :)

Aye, it was Brahms, indeed.  I reserve the right to quarrel with him on one or two small points in his magnificent oeuvre  8)

Thread Duty:

Chas. Knox (who recently turned 89)
Rivers Run Through It, Sonatina for Flute & Piano
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113128 on: Today at 10:37:58 AM »
It’s natural for your clarinetist self to be tickled by this cast makeover, Karl !  ;)

Online mc ukrneal

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113129 on: Today at 10:39:16 AM »
Haven't listened to this one in some time: Dvorak Symphony No. 6 Dohnanyi/Cleveland. Phenomenal playing in outstanding sound.  A perfect way to end the day...

Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Online San Antone

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113130 on: Today at 11:06:10 AM »
Afaik, Brahms himself transcribed them for the viola, so it's as legit as it gets.  :)

I love these works on viola, and am listening to this right now.



Lars Vogt has made Brahms his focus for a while - and I have enjoyed all of the various recordings.

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #113131 on: Today at 11:53:52 AM »
Aye, it was Brahms, indeed.  I reserve the right to quarrel with him on one or two small points in his magnificent oeuvre  8)

Oooops, for a moment I did forget you are a clarinetist by trade!  :laugh:

But then again:

What's in a name tone? that which we call a rose clarinet
By any other name pitch would smell sound as sweet


 :P :P :P

Chaque fleur s'évapore ainsi qu'un encensoir;
Le violon frémit comme un cœur qu'on afflige;
Valse mélancolique et langoureux vertige!
Le ciel est triste et beau comme un grand reposoir.