Author Topic: Tippett's Tearoom  (Read 55410 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #440 on: October 28, 2017, 09:32:46 PM »
I like Tippett's first two symphonies quite a bit, but I do understand what you mean about his music being too complex and "busy" for its own good. That said, I've sampled a bit of his The Rose Lake which sounded quite entrancing.

The Rose Lake is very much worth your time, Kyle.
"Music should be able to invoke the natural emotions in all human beings. Music is not notes fixed on apiece of paper.” - Toru Takemitsu

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #441 on: October 29, 2017, 01:10:31 AM »
A new CD of symphonies 1 and 2 is coming out on Hyperion I think. A former work colleague knew Tippett quite well. He is not one of my favourite composers but I think that the Concerto for Double String Orchestra is a wonderful work. I also like symphonies 1 and 2 the Corelli Variations, the Suite of the Birthday of Prince Charles and the oratorio 'A Child of Our Time', the end of which I find incredibly moving.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline DaveF

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #442 on: October 30, 2017, 01:15:54 PM »
A new CD of symphonies 1 and 2 is coming out on Hyperion I think.

Yes - conducted by the indefatigable Brabbins.  That is good news - even no.2, a 20th-century masterpiece (IMHO), isn't exactly well-served on disc.  No.1 is superb too, with that rather Shostakovich-like (and rather un-Tippett-like) passacaglia slow movement.
"Just because I like something, it doesn't mean it's any good."

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #443 on: February 01, 2018, 11:31:23 PM »
I have just posted a recording of the BBC broadcast of the Symphony in Bflat from 1932 ('Symphony No.0')

http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,506.195.html

(You have to register before being able to download).

Online Roasted Swan

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #444 on: October 12, 2018, 09:46:23 AM »
Good job I checked there was a thread for Tippett - otherwise I was going to start Tippett's tribulations...!

Is it just my impression or has Tippett really fallen from favour since his death?  OK there is this Hyperion cycle started of his symphonies - but not much else is being added to the recorded catalogue.  Is he featuring much in concerts?  I really don't know.

He's never been a favourite or even a moderatley liked composer of mine but out of duty(!) rather than pleasure I listened to Symphony No.4 recently from Hickox



and goodness me I enjoyed it a lot.  Excellent Chandos engineering backing up really committed BSO playing.  I still think he makes the textures and the musical material too complex - but I'm closely than ever to being convinced......

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #445 on: October 12, 2018, 03:30:57 PM »
Good job I checked there was a thread for Tippett - otherwise I was going to start Tippett's tribulations...!

Is it just my impression or has Tippett really fallen from favour since his death?  OK there is this Hyperion cycle started of his symphonies - but not much else is being added to the recorded catalogue.  Is he featuring much in concerts?  I really don't know.

He's never been a favourite or even a moderatley liked composer of mine but out of duty(!) rather than pleasure I listened to Symphony No.4 recently from Hickox



and goodness me I enjoyed it a lot.  Excellent Chandos engineering backing up really committed BSO playing.  I still think he makes the textures and the musical material too complex - but I'm closely than ever to being convinced......

It's a captivating and mysterious work, it could not be straightforward at first listens but my experience with this symphony is always rewarding. There is a masterful use of the percussion to create some disquieting effects. I only have that recording and I'm quite pleased with it.

Offline Biffo

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #446 on: October 13, 2018, 02:29:39 AM »
Several years ago there was quite an active discussion of Tippett and the 4th Symphony in particular. I had owned the Solti/Chicago SO recording for quite some time so I listened to it again; as with my first listening it it did very little for me. Others were enthusiastic so I persisted. I found an analysis of the work and was able to follow it while listening. It clarified the structure of the piece but still didn't endear it to me.

My favourite Tippett pieces are the Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli and the Concerto for Double String Orchestra - Marriner/ASMF is unsurpassed in both.

Offline knight66

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #447 on: October 13, 2018, 01:18:24 PM »
About the only large scale piece of his that has a foothold in the UK is The Child of Our Time. Up against his operas for example, it is accessable. The contempory champions of his operas have died, Hickox and Davis, and no one currently seems inclined to advocate them. They are like slabs of philosophy stuffed onto the stage. And listening to him explaining them, I felt I could understand why they were so clotted and basically untheatrical.

I can’t remember the last time I saw one of his symphonies programmed, mabe a year or so ago in the London Proms.

Perhaps he will be rediscovered. Or perhaps Child of Our Time and the string pieces mentioned will be all that is played.

Mike
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