Author Topic: Schoenberg's Sheen  (Read 54401 times)

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karlhenning

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Schoenberg's Sheen
« on: April 12, 2007, 07:35:28 AM »
Saw this post, and knew there had to be a thread:

Schoenberg op.8

now that i've got a fast connection, i'm listening to all the Schoenberg that i haven't heard yet! yessssssssss!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Some of My Favorite Schoenberg:

Gurrelieder
Verklärte Nacht, string sextet, Opus 4
Quartets. Opp. 7, 10, 30 & 37
Chamber Symphony No. 1, Opus 9
Opus 11 piano pieces!
Opus 23 piano pieces!
Serenade, Opus 24
Chamber Symphony No. 2, Opus 38
Piano Concerto, Opus 42
String Trio, Opus 45
Moses und Aron
Cello Concerto (after Monn)
« Last Edit: July 28, 2010, 01:53:30 PM by k a rl h e nn i ng »

Offline Brewski

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2007, 08:02:43 AM »
Some of My Favorite Schoenberg:

Gurrelieder
Verklärte Nacht, string sextet, Opus 4
Quartets. Opp. 7, 10, 30 & 37
Chamber Symphony No. 1, Opus 9
Opus 11 piano pieces!
Opus 23 piano pieces!
Serenade, Opus 24
Chamber Symphony No. 2, Opus 38
Piano Concerto, Opus 42
String Trio, Opus 45
Moses und Aron
Cello Concerto (after Monn)



Yes, all great.  And I would add the Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16, which I truly never tire of hearing.  Favorite live performances from the recent past: Chailly and the Concertgebouw Orchestra in 1999, on a program that also included Brahms' Violin Concerto (with Vadim Repin) and Brahms' Symphony No. 2, and an excellent chamber version in 2005 by James Levine and the Met Orchestra, on a program that included Dallapiccola and Carter.

--Bruce
Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire.
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Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Cato

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2007, 08:05:46 AM »
I just had to take the time to add my favorites too:

Five Pieces for Orchestra You will wish there were 10!

Pelleas und Melisande  Hot, humid, and hysterical!

String Quartet #2  Cool winds from Mars expected later today!

Friede auf Erde Eventually there is peace at the end!
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

karlhenning

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2007, 08:09:56 AM »
Pelleas und Melisande  Hot, humid, and hysterical!

Oh, man . . . thought I'd lumbered into the Debussy thread by mistake!

Welcome, Cato!

Have yet to find a recording of the Kol nidre . . . .

springrite

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2007, 08:13:31 AM »
Oh, man . . . thought I'd lumbered into the Debussy thread by mistake!

Or Faure!

My favorite is probably the Five Pieces.

Offline Cato

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2007, 09:43:15 AM »
Oh, man . . . thought I'd lumbered into the Debussy thread by mistake!


When record companies had imagination, there was a disc available with Schoenberg's tone poem, and the stage music by both Sibelius and Faure.

Karl, for the Schoenberg  Kol Nidre check out these CD's:

http://www.hbdirect.com/album_detail.php?pid=391848

http://www.hbdirect.com/album_detail.php?pid=27992

I did not find them on Amazon, but this company is very good.
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2007, 10:25:45 AM »
For a quality one-stop for Pelleas, this new Czech disc might fit the bill.






Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Cato

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2007, 06:50:13 AM »
I see this Czech disc even has opera excerpts from Debussy: is the Pink Harp fanatic still around?  This should be of interest to him!

The recording must be from the 60's or 70's given that Baudo is conducting.  Supraphon records from that time occasionally had problems with heavy hiss, but this one might be okay.

"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline Novi

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2007, 06:58:02 AM »
I like Pierrot Lunaire. Trippy stuff ...
Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den der heimlich lauschet.

greg

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2007, 06:58:59 AM »
Saw this post, and knew there had to be a thread:

Some of My Favorite Schoenberg:

Gurrelieder
Verklärte Nacht, string sextet, Opus 4
Quartets. Opp. 7, 10, 30 & 37
Chamber Symphony No. 1, Opus 9
Opus 11 piano pieces!
Opus 23 piano pieces!
Serenade, Opus 24
Chamber Symphony No. 2, Opus 38
Piano Concerto, Opus 42
String Trio, Opus 45
Moses und Aron
Cello Concerto (after Monn)


i listened to the 1st chamber concerto and the string trio, too, yesterday
still more to go, yay  8)

my favorites:
5 pieces for Orchestra
Book of Hanging Gardens
Variations for Orchestra
Piano Suite (if it's Glenn Gould performing)
3 pieces for piano
Transfigured night
Suite (i forget which one, i think with chamber instruments)
Pierrot Lunaire
Piano Concerto
Ode to Napoleon Dynamite (i mean Buonaparte, hehehe)
and more.....

listened to the 2nd string quartet again awhile ago... my opinion has changed a little. it's not so bad as i thought before, especially if i have in mind his other works from that period

karlhenning

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2007, 07:01:08 AM »
I need to revisit that there Book of the Hanging Gardens, Greg!

greg

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2007, 07:08:08 AM »
I need to revisit that there Book of the Hanging Gardens, Greg!
Go ahead! Usually his stuff grows on you if you don't know what to think at first.
What's interesting is his harmonic language at the time when he first starts diving into free atonality. You hear something like the Chamber Symphony or Transfigured Night, with late-Romantic sounds that could come from someone like Strauss, which is mixed up with lots of whole-tone sounding stuff- and then it evolves rapidly into atonality, though it's a completely different type of atonality than his serial stuff. It's like late-Romantic atonality, which is really cool

Offline edward

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2007, 08:17:50 AM »
Lots of great pieces there: two that I particularly like which aren't mentioned elsewhere (probably because they are in truth minor Schoenberg) are the gorgeous Weihnachtsmusik and the completely silly String Quartet Concerto.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Don Giovanni

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2007, 08:54:08 AM »
The Five Pieces for Orchestra are blisteringly brilliant. I think one critic wrote that the last movement was the greatest work of modernism in music. I wouldn't agree but I can see why he might have been stirred into such moments of hyperbole.

Along with the Serenade and String Quartet No. 2, these are my favourite Schoenberg works.

Offline Cato

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2007, 09:03:42 AM »
And one of Schoenberg's most fun works (yes, I said fun, and I'm glad, I tell you, glad!!!) is...

The Violin Concerto!

Not to be missed!
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

mahlertitan

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2007, 12:05:21 PM »
i like the lighter works, the highly complex suite for strings in G

Don Giovanni

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2007, 12:38:59 PM »
What do people think of the piano music? Which recording is the best to own? I've heard that Pollini is one of the best.

Don Giovanni

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Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2007, 01:48:01 PM »
I still believe that Schoenberg doesn't get half the recognition he deserves. Even if people just recognised his importance - provided they had heard at least some of his works. I know that Webern could be said to have had more influence on the later serialists but, nevertheless, Schoenberg did ignite the whole movement and bring music 'over the edge of the cliff' - the edge that people like Mahler and Strauss had been edging nearer to all the time. Indeed, one of the first examples I can think of of 'over the edge' music is Schoenberg's 2nd quartet - wonderful piece.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2007, 08:08:50 PM »
What do people think of the piano music? Which recording is the best to own? I've heard that Pollini is one of the best.

I find much to admire in Schoenberg's solo piano music. And to me Pollini gets right to the heart of it.

What little Uchida has recorded (on her PC disc) is good too.





Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: Let Schoenberg Schine
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2007, 08:42:49 PM »
Anyone have any thoughts on Jacob's Ladder?

I've just been listening to the disc below and am bowled over by the beauty of the music! By turns bold, delicate, and layered with much color.

Nagano conducts with a romantic influence yet by no means downplays the edginess.

I've not seen much in print about this work but under Nagano's direction I detect much to rave about!

And the text...little doubt this would be a hard one in the theater! ;D




Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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