Author Topic: Estonian composers  (Read 6879 times)

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Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2008, 11:05:51 AM »
I played the Raid Symphony again yesterday. I love the ending, which reminded me of a more affirmitive version of the end of Rachmaninov's First Symphony.In the case of Rachmaninov the whole thing finally topples into the abyss at the end having teetered on the brink of doing so for some time.

I'll have to listen again. The end of Rachmaninov's First is etched in my memory, though - it is indeed like the fall of an empire (Ashkenazy takes it very slow, which adds to the effect).
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2008, 07:25:50 AM »
I'll have to listen again. The end of Rachmaninov's First is etched in my memory, though - it is indeed like the fall of an empire (Ashkenazy takes it very slow, which adds to the effect).

It is the Ashkenazy and Svetlanov versions that I listen to.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2008, 01:22:59 PM »
Great admirer of Ashkenazy in this very fine symphony :)

Offline Christo

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #23 on: August 01, 2008, 09:43:55 PM »
Great admirer of Ashkenazy in this very fine symphony :)

[Completely OT: on a visit to Iceland, back in 1999 - en route from Estonia btw - I heard a lovely story about Ashkenazy. When he applied for Icelandic citizenship in the 1970s (following his wife Sofia Johannsdottir) the authorities were so happy with the fact, that for once they didn't apply the law that forces all immigrants to adopt a standard Icelandic name (like e.g. Jón Jónsson). Instead, "Vladimir Ashkenazy" was written in the records as an authentic Icelandic name.

Later, in the early 1990s, an immigrant from Sri Lanka applied for Icelandic citizenship and filled in "Vladimir Ashkenazy" as the Icelandic name of his choice. Since then, he's been happily living in Reykjavík, I was told. :D The moral of the story: always check if your beloved Rachmaninov recording is conducted by the right Ashenazy.  0:)
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2008, 05:04:16 AM »
[Completely OT: on a visit to Iceland, back in 1999 - en route from Estonia btw - I heard a lovely story about Ashkenazy. When he applied for Icelandic citizenship in the 1970s (following his wife Sofia Johannsdottir) the authorities were so happy with the fact, that for once they didn't apply the law that forces all immigrants to adopt a standard Icelandic name (like e.g. Jón Jónsson). Instead, "Vladimir Ashkenazy" was written in the records as an authentic Icelandic name.

Later, in the early 1990s, an immigrant from Sri Lanka applied for Icelandic citizenship and filled in "Vladimir Ashkenazy" as the Icelandic name of his choice. Since then, he's been happily living in Reykjavík, I was told. :D The moral of the story: always check if your beloved Rachmaninov recording is conducted by the right Ashenazy.  0:)


What a nice story :)

"...a visit to Iceland...en route from Estonia...". That's an odd way to get to the Netherlands, Johan! The captain should really have turned left when out of the Skaggerak :) :)

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2008, 05:50:19 AM »
Yes, a very nice story!
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2010, 05:44:53 AM »
Any views on Tormis? (Christo is probably having tea with him as I write  ;D). I just heard the 'Overture No 2' on the great Chandos CD featuring an all Estonian programme conducted by Neema Jarvi.  I was impressed by this dramatic work, although I think that Tormis is best known for his choral works.  I read an enthusiastic review of a Hyperion CD on the Amazon site, but it didn't say much about the music itself and I'd be interested to learn more.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Christo

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2010, 09:25:53 AM »
Any views on Tormis? (Christo is probably having tea with him as I write  ;D). I just heard the 'Overture No 2' on the great Chandos CD featuring an all Estonian programme conducted by Neema Jarvi.  I was impressed by this dramatic work, although I think that Tormis is best known for his choral works.  I read an enthusiastic review of a Hyperion CD on the Amazon site, but it didn't say much about the music itself and I'd be interested to learn more.
We always opt for a stronger drink.  :P Well, I did meet the man, but only once. As long ago as 1993, during my first travel ever to Estonia, just two years after the country's newly won independence. I knew this Overture No. 2 by then - he told me he was mainly inspired by Tubin's Fitth Symphony when composing it, but also by his Muscovite teachers he'd just been studying with.

What I admired most, and still do, was his Unustatud rahvad or `Forgotten Peoples' cycle, as appeared on a ECM New Series double cd.


This twofer has never been equalled, but there are many more cd's with fine selections of Tormis' choral output. Some other orchestral pieces, especially the Suite from his opera Luigelend (Swan Flight) are to be found on the other cd here.
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Lilas Pastia

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2010, 09:56:09 AM »
Apart from the Overture # 2 I only have his Bourdon Songs (on a cd titled Baltic Voices - choral music). I should give it another hearing. I seem to recall it's an imposing work, but no more than that. Will report in time.

Offline monafam

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #29 on: January 10, 2010, 12:31:39 PM »
I checked out some works by Ester Magi who I think is Estonian  THey were pretty good.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2010, 02:03:26 PM »
We always opt for a stronger drink.  :P Well, I did meet the man, but only once. As long ago as 1993, during my first travel ever to Estonia, just two years after the country's newly won independence. I knew this Overture No. 2 by then - he told me he was mainly inspired by Tubin's Fitth Symphony when composing it, but also by his Muscovite teachers he'd just been studying with.

What I admired most, and still do, was his Unustatud rahvad or `Forgotten Peoples' cycle, as appeared on a ECM New Series double cd.


This twofer has never been equalled, but there are many more cd's with fine selections of Tormis' choral output. Some other orchestral pieces, especially the Suite from his opera Luigelend (Swan Flight) are to be found on the other cd here.

Many thanks. I think that I must have heard a BBC TV programme at about the time of Estonia's independence from the USSR. I recall lots of people lined up in a field singing a haunting song - I guess this was by Tormis.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #31 on: November 18, 2017, 05:21:07 PM »
I'm thrilled by the Kaljo Raid's Symphony no. 1. What an experience! I fell in love with this majestic piece instantly. It has a strong nordic mood, and of course, it's EPIC as I like!!! This symphony is very well done, beautifully composed. The 1st mov. is very similar to the 1st mov. from Walton's Symphony no. 1 in character and power. The symphony also shares very close characteristics with those ones by Tubin. The 3rd mov. is incredibly poetic and deep, full of contemplative moments.

This work ranks highly in my discoveries of this year.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #32 on: November 19, 2017, 02:31:55 AM »
I'm thrilled by the Kaljo Raid's Symphony no. 1. What an experience! I fell in love with this majestic piece instantly. It has a strong nordic mood, and of course, it's EPIC as I like!!! This symphony is very well done, beautifully composed. The 1st mov. is very similar to the 1st mov. from Walton's Symphony no. 1 in character and power. The symphony also shares very close characteristics with those ones by Tubin. The 3rd mov. is incredibly poetic and deep, full of contemplative moments.

This work ranks highly in my discoveries of this year.
I'm delighted that you discovered this work Caesar - it is one of my favourites too - an absolutely marvellously inspiriting  score, rather in the spirit of Tubin, whose Third Symphony 'Heroic' I was listening to yesterday.
I think that the Walton 1st Symphony connection is apt, as it is for Klaus Egge's First Symphony.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 02:34:01 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #33 on: November 19, 2017, 12:31:04 PM »
I'm delighted that you discovered this work Caesar - it is one of my favourites too - an absolutely marvellously inspiriting  score, rather in the spirit of Tubin, whose Third Symphony 'Heroic' I was listening to yesterday.
I think that the Walton 1st Symphony connection is apt, as it is for Klaus Egge's First Symphony.

Clearly I agree. I don't know the Egge's symphony yet, though there is a recording on YouTube. The bad news is the sound quality since it's not the best  :(

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #34 on: November 19, 2017, 06:20:39 PM »
Not long ago on the 21st Century thread we were discussing a piece of music by Estonian composer Mirjam Tally

More on the topic of orchestral aesthetics, what do you lot think of this?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/yRtdpaArnNM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/yRtdpaArnNM</a>

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #35 on: April 12, 2019, 06:45:26 AM »
I really enjoyed this performance of the Tormis's Overture No. 2, apparently inspired by Tubin's 5th Symphony. If anything it has more urgency than the very fine recorded performance conducted by Jarvi Senior on Chandos. I also discovered a nice online photo of Tormis in London, very near where I used to go to school:
« Last Edit: April 12, 2019, 06:47:46 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline relm1

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #36 on: April 12, 2019, 04:30:06 PM »
I really enjoyed this performance of the Tormis's Overture No. 2, apparently inspired by Tubin's 5th Symphony. If anything it has more urgency than the very fine recorded performance conducted by Jarvi Senior on Chandos. I also discovered a nice online photo of Tormis in London, very near where I used to go to school:


I love the very same work and venue!  I played the Saint Paul organ once too!  Before I was yelled at to leave. :)

Offline Christo

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2019, 09:45:58 PM »
Well, I did meet the man, but only once. As long ago as 1993, during my first travel ever to Estonia, just two years after the country's newly won independence. I knew this Overture No. 2 by then - he told me he was mainly inspired by Tubin's Fitth Symphony when composing it, but also by his Muscovite teachers he'd just been studying with.

What I admired most, and still do, was his Unustatud rahvad or `Forgotten Peoples' cycle, as appeared on a ECM New Series double cd.


This twofer has never been equalled, but there are many more cd's with fine selections of Tormis' choral output. Some other orchestral pieces, especially the Suite from his opera Luigelend (Swan Flight) are to be found on the other cd here.
Veljo Tormis died two years ago. But it happened that I met him again, later in 2010, at a dinner in honour of his 80th birthday in the Estonian Embassy in The Hague. I was somehow on the list of the Estonian ambassador - we were a group of twelve invitees and shared a great evening with him (I had presented a new book earlier that day, so I remember the very date). I still see 'Forgotten Peoples' as his masterwork.
I really enjoyed this performance of the Tormis's Overture No. 2, apparently inspired by Tubin's 5th Symphony. If anything it has more urgency than the very fine recorded performance conducted by Jarvi Senior on Chandos. I also discovered a nice online photo of Tormis in London, very near where I used to go to school:
Nice! In 2010 he was looking like this:
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2019, 10:41:43 PM »
I love the very same work and venue!  I played the Saint Paul organ once too!  Before I was yelled at to leave. :)
Excellent Karim! Delighted to hear that you played the St Paul's organ but sorry you were yelled at. Let me know if you are in London again.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Estonian composers
« Reply #39 on: April 12, 2019, 10:44:50 PM »
Veljo Tormis died two years ago. But it happened that I met him again, later in 2010, at a dinner in honour of his 80th birthday in the Estonian Embassy in The Hague. I was somehow on the list of the Estonian ambassador - we were a group of twelve invitees and shared a great evening with him (I had presented a new book earlier that day, so I remember the very date). I still see 'Forgotten Peoples' as his masterwork. Nice! In 2010 he was looking like this:
How great that you met him again Johan. You obviously move in elevated circles! I will look out for more of his music. There is quite a lot online.
 8)
« Last Edit: April 12, 2019, 10:47:44 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).