Author Topic: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)  (Read 36899 times)

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Offline Madiel

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #200 on: June 07, 2018, 03:42:42 PM »
Your opinion of Brahms or of Faure is not the issue. Your emphatic declaration that a comparison between the two would never occur to you is the issue.

Why exactly do you think I ever mentioned Brahms in the first place? You acted as if I conjured the idea out of thin air.
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Baron Scarpia

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #201 on: June 08, 2018, 05:16:43 AM »
Now moving on to the Piano Quintets.



There is a clear change in style here, these are both relatively late works, in contrast to both of the Piano Quartets. The string ensemble here is a string quartet, rather than a string trio, and there Faure uses it as more self-sufficient sub-ensemble. If a string quartet is the Chamber music equivalent of a symphony, normally a Piano Quartet or Quintet seems to be the chamber music equivalent of a piano concerto, with back-and-forth interplay between the piano and string sections, each section having passages where they dominate while their counterpart is silent or accompanies. In this piece the strings are almost always to the fore, with the piano playing a burbling accompaniment, perhaps offering a subtle counter-melody. I hardly can recall a passage where the piano boldly comes forward to state or develop a theme. This is a contrast to the Piano Quartets, which strike me as following the conventional style of a Piano Quartet.

In this work Faure works in a more unique personal style, and I am looking forward to listening to the second Piano Quintet, which is really my favorite of the group.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2018, 05:29:19 AM by Baron Scarpia »

Offline San Antone

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #202 on: June 08, 2018, 06:55:28 AM »
Now moving on to the Piano Quintets.



There is a clear change in style here, these are both relatively late works, in contrast to both of the Piano Quartets. The string ensemble here is a string quartet, rather than a string trio, and there Faure uses it as more self-sufficient sub-ensemble. If a string quartet is the Chamber music equivalent of a symphony, normally a Piano Quartet or Quintet seems to be the chamber music equivalent of a piano concerto, with back-and-forth interplay between the piano and string sections, each section having passages where they dominate while their counterpart is silent or accompanies. In this piece the strings are almost always to the fore, with the piano playing a burbling accompaniment, perhaps offering a subtle counter-melody. I hardly can recall a passage where the piano boldly comes forward to state or develop a theme. This is a contrast to the Piano Quartets, which strike me as following the conventional style of a Piano Quartet.

In this work Faure works in a more unique personal style, and I am looking forward to listening to the second Piano Quintet, which is really my favorite of the group.

These works, the quartets and quintets, are wonderful, imo.  And I have enjoyed reading your posts about them.  Carry on!   :)

Baron Scarpia

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #203 on: June 08, 2018, 07:31:28 AM »
These works, the quartets and quintets, are wonderful, imo.  And I have enjoyed reading your posts about them.  Carry on!   :)

Glad to hear you find my comment interesting. I'll probably spend another day with this piece before moving on to the final Piano Quintet. Then there is the Piano Trio.

Offline kyjo

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #204 on: June 10, 2018, 08:25:03 AM »
The Piano Trio is gorgeous. I think I prefer it to the two piano quintets, great as they are.
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Offline 71 dB

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #205 on: June 10, 2018, 09:13:29 AM »
My recommendation for an alternative recording:


Q

Seconded. Wonderful disc!  0:)
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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #206 on: June 10, 2018, 10:25:27 AM »
Seconded. Wonderful disc!  0:)

Third-ed  ;D

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #207 on: June 10, 2018, 10:55:05 AM »
The Piano Trio is gorgeous. I think I prefer it to the two piano quintets, great as they are.

Somehow I have almost ignored this work, but I'm listening* to it again after 10 years or so.

* Dumay, Lodeón and Collard
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Baron Scarpia

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Re: Gabriel Fauré (Faure)
« Reply #208 on: June 11, 2018, 07:16:21 AM »
I've moved on to the Piano Quintet No 2, and have to admit I've been getting fatigued of the Domus recordings, which are a bit dry for my taste, with a string sound that can be a bit grating. I've continued with the Pascal Roge/Quatour Ysaye recording on Decca.

I find the work itself to be very fine. The first movement begins with a flowing piano figure against which strings introduce the primary theme, first solo, later in unison and in rich harmonization. A second theme begins with what sounds like an academic fugue, but this quickly evolves into free-flowing counterpoint. What I enjoy most about this quartet is the way that rather sharp functional dissonances are used as an expressive device. The scherzo is similar to the others in the series, initially dominated by intense writing for piano, with a central section where more lyrical contributions from the strings come to the fore. The slow movement, in my impression, is a continuation of the mood of the first movement, with lyrical writing for strings with sometimes dissonant harmonization dominating the music. The finale takes us from a rather jaunty beginning to a sublime close. I think of this as one of Faure's best works.

The Roge/Ysaye recording on Decca pleased me more than Domus (which doesn't seem to have the same magic as Susan Tomes' later ensemble, the Florestan Trio). Pascal Roge finds brings out Faure's subtle writing for piano better and the string ensemble is more flexible and expressive. Decca provides audio that has more "air" and is more pleasing to me. I think I will revisit the other piano quartets and quintet in the Roge/Ysaye recordings.



Lastly will be the trio. The last time I listened to it, not long ago, was after listening to the Debussy and Ravel Piano Trios, and by contrast the Faure seemed disappointingly fore-square. I will approach it again shortly.