Author Topic: Carl Nielsen  (Read 111143 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline edward

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3684
  • Hello, little man. I will destroy you.
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #60 on: July 10, 2008, 03:35:37 PM »
Are you referring to a particular recording of Andsnes?
As far as I'm aware, he's only made one recording of Nielsen's piano music:



It's oop now, but has been released a few times (including on the new EMI big Nielsen box) so shouldn't be too hard to find.
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
 -- Aaron Copland, The Pleasures of Music

Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8744
  • William Havergal Brian, symphonist (1876-1972)
    • JZH Text Services
  • Location: Delft, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bruckner, Wagner, Brian, Bax, Dyson, Delius...
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #61 on: July 10, 2008, 10:50:32 PM »
I remember back in the early 1960s when Nielsen was hardly ever played in Britain reading Robert Simpson's book on the composer and then buying LPs of the 2nd and 5th Symphonies conducted by Thomas Jensen and the 4th by Launy Grondahl. There are those old Nielsen afficianados who will tell you that these early recordings have never been surpassed! I still have the LPs in my collection. There is an authenticity and sheer burning intensity which is quite remarkable!



I have just listened to Launy Grondahl's reading of Nielsen's 2nd - a great (live) performance, very authoritative. (download from eMusic)
Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything. -- Plato

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5841
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #62 on: July 11, 2008, 12:51:19 AM »
The Naxos recordings of the piano music are very ordinary,

Perhaps, but I like the sound on those discs. I remember when I bought volume one alongside with Buxtehude's Membra Jesu nostri at a Hifi-exhibition back in 1997.  :)
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

Henk

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #63 on: July 11, 2008, 01:23:54 AM »
Perhaps, but I like the sound on those discs. I remember when I bought volume one alongside with Buxtehude's Membra Jesu nostri at a Hifi-exhibition back in 1997.  :)

I tought it was a 2008 recording, because I can't find it in the Naxos' catalogue.

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5841
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #64 on: July 11, 2008, 02:03:31 AM »
I tought it was a 2008 recording, because I can't find it in the Naxos' catalogue.

Nielsen - Complete Piano Music Volume 1 - Naxos 8.553574 - Released 1997
Nielsen - Complete Piano Music Volume 2 - Naxos 8.553653 - Released 1998
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #65 on: July 11, 2008, 02:30:47 AM »
I think the Nielsen Symphony cycle I have (Adrian Leaper) is the only one that is NEVER talked about.

I cannot speak for anyone else who hasn't talked about it.

I haven't talked about it, because I haven't heard it.

Also, as I have three Nielsen cycles which I like very well, there's no great likelihood of my troubling to seek Leaper out.

There, Poju; that's as much talking about Leaper as I can with integrity justify  8)

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #66 on: July 11, 2008, 02:37:56 AM »
I also recall as a schoolboy having long arguments with friends about which was the greater composer-Sibelius or Nielsen :)

That's the spirit!  :D

Quote
Wouldn't get into that sort of argument today :)

Except that there is a good case to be made for the perception of Sibelius's greatness (there is actual greatness there, of course, but it's the old if a tree falls in the forest and no one hears, does it make a sound? parable) depending on international connections that he made during his career, and the consequent distribution of his work;  where Nielsen did not have occasion to "export" during his lifetime, perhaps.  The jbuck argument would go, "Obviously Sibelius is greater, because more people acknowledge his greatness, and time and the majority Can't Be Wrong" . . . though, as I say, this presupposes that the circumstances that Nielsen's music has not penetrated to a broader audience "mean" that he is a composer "inferior" to Sibelius.

Quote
Two of my favourite short Nielsen compositions are the marvellous Overture "Helios" and-an especial favourite-the Rhapsody Overture "An Imaginary Journey to the Faeroe Islands". Both are magical pieces!

Agreed, and especially w/r/t Helios!

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3540
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #67 on: July 11, 2008, 02:43:34 AM »
Am I the only one who has heard it or is it just so forgettable?

No - not either. They used to be the first complete cycle in my collection too, and as far as I'm concerned, they're absolutely fine - no reason to avoid the Le[a]per, or jump over it!  8)

Their only handicap being: there are just so many superb cycles available, these days.
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #68 on: July 11, 2008, 03:20:27 AM »
. . . there are just so many superb cycles available, these days.

Of course, that is all to the good!

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5841
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #69 on: July 11, 2008, 04:35:26 AM »
Their only handicap being: there are just so many superb cycles available, these days.

Well, sure there are but my wallet is handicap too so the Leaper cycle may reign in my Nielsen collection.

There is just so many symphonies I haven't even heard... ... RVW's for instance.  ::)

Anyway, I am sure Nielsen >>>> RVW.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2008, 04:40:22 AM by 71 dB »
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5841
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #70 on: July 11, 2008, 04:46:17 AM »
I cannot speak for anyone else who hasn't talked about it.

I haven't talked about it, because I haven't heard it.

Also, as I have three Nielsen cycles which I like very well, there's no great likelihood of my troubling to seek Leaper out.

There, Poju; that's as much talking about Leaper as I can with integrity justify  8)

I find your tone of voice patronizing. You don't need to discuss about a CD you don't have nor have heard.
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3540
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #71 on: July 11, 2008, 04:56:39 AM »
Anyway, I am sure Nielsen >>>> RVW.

I followed the path: RVW >>>> Nielsen  (>>>> Tubin a.s.o.) and found it quite a natural one, indeed.  :D
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Dundonnell

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3599
  • Edmund Rubbra(1901-86)
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #72 on: July 11, 2008, 12:46:35 PM »
That's the spirit!  :D

Except that there is a good case to be made for the perception of Sibelius's greatness (there is actual greatness there, of course, but it's the old if a tree falls in the forest and no one hears, does it make a sound? parable) depending on international connections that he made during his career, and the consequent distribution of his work;  where Nielsen did not have occasion to "export" during his lifetime, perhaps.  The jbuck argument would go, "Obviously Sibelius is greater, because more people acknowledge his greatness, and time and the majority Can't Be Wrong" . . . though, as I say, this presupposes that the circumstances that Nielsen's music has not penetrated to a broader audience "mean" that he is a composer "inferior" to Sibelius.

Agreed, and especially w/r/t Helios!

I was a contrary teenager at the time-though probably not very typical :) If a particular composer was popular/revered I tended to set someone else up in opposition and sing that composer's praises instead. Thus Nielsen over Sibelius, Walton over Britten etc. I do, however, now firmly believe that both Sibelius and Nielsen were great composers of genius in their different ways and that their best music is imperishable.

Well, at least it was not the Beatles v The Rolling Stones as per my contemporaries :)

Offline Opus106

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9043
  • Bachafugaholic
  • Location: Chennai, India
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #73 on: April 15, 2009, 07:31:33 AM »
Carl Nielsen: first discovery of 2009. Wow! Just finished listening to the symphony No. 5, and I love it! It was just a couple of weeks ago that I found and enjoyed listening to the Aladdin Suite. A fun piece it was. I didn't care to explore further, but I found a download of a recent performance of the symphony and curiosity got the better of me. I'm glad it did.

I did read a little bit about the work before listening, and to be honest, I didn't have hope of sitting through the entire performance. The first part of the first movement was a bit unsettling - and not to mention those snare drums which don't make an appearance in the works I usually listen to -  but nothing to force me listen to something else, instead. Then came the oh-so-lovely adagio. Beautiful. And  the frenzy in the opening and closing of the second movement was enough to seal the deal, so to speak.

Now to find more Nielsen's works.
Regards,
Navneeth

Offline Superhorn

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 844
  • Location: U.S.A.
  • Currently Listening to:
    I'm a classical music omnivore
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #74 on: April 16, 2009, 10:51:46 AM »
  Nielsen was a true individualist; he never followed any"isms"; he always remained himself. He isn't a true late romantic, or a doctrinaire modernist,or neoclassical, or whatever.
  It's virtually impossible to pidgeonhole him.
  I also love Nielsen's first opera,"Saul and David", and have long treasured the wonderful Chandos recording with Neeme Jarvi and the Danish RSO, with the late Aage Haugland as king Saul. 
  This is a starkly powerful yet noble opera, and   Saul is a magnificent role for the bass voice. I'm sure that if many of this centurie's great basses had known this opera,they would have loved to sing it. It's comparable to the role of Boris Godunov.  Perhaps Rene Pape could do this role, and I think that Samuel Ramey,Kurt Moll ,George London, or James Morris might have loved to sing this opera.
  How about it,Met? 
   I got to know the Nielsen piano works on an old LP many years ago,I believe on Vox, by the wonderful Danish pianist Arne Skjold-Rasmussen, who knew Nielsen personally,and was an authoritative advocate of this music. If it appears on CD, grab this set.
  I also have the Chandos CD of the complete incidental music to Aladdin,with Rozhdestvensky and the Danish RSO. It contains much intriguing music not in the more familiar suite,plus chorus.
  The choral works Hymnis Amoris and Sleep are wonderful, as well as the charming folksy cantata "Springtime on Funen, which I have on a Chandos CD with Leif Segerstam and the Danish RSO.

DFO

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #75 on: April 16, 2009, 12:51:25 PM »
I've his string quartets, the string quintet, the wind quintet, the violin sonatas and solo pieces, and the first recordings of his concertos: Paul Birkelund (1958) on flute; Ib Eriksson (1954) on clarinet, and Emil Telmanyi (1947) on violin. All magnificent works IMO.

ChamberNut

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #76 on: April 16, 2009, 01:38:12 PM »
Now to find more Nielsen's works.

Discovering Nielsen (String Quartets and symphonies) is on my list.

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11042
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #77 on: May 27, 2009, 12:41:12 AM »
Has Paavo Berglund's Bournemouth SO recording of Nielsen's 5th Symphony (EMI LP) ever been on CD?
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1673
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #78 on: May 27, 2009, 12:58:35 AM »
I've his string quartets, the string quintet, the wind quintet, the violin sonatas and solo pieces, and the first recordings of his concertos: Paul Birkelund (1958) on flute; Ib Eriksson (1954) on clarinet, and Emil Telmanyi (1947) on violin. All magnificent works IMO.

I've never warmed to Nielsen's chamber works. I love his symphonies 4 - 6, though.

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Carl Nielsen
« Reply #79 on: May 27, 2009, 03:31:15 AM »
I've never warmed to Nielsen's chamber works. I love his symphonies 4 - 6, though.

The wind quintet is very likeable, but I agree that it is missing the verve and arc of the symphonies.