Author Topic: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas  (Read 3782 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

snyprrr

  • Guest
French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« on: April 08, 2014, 03:45:38 PM »
The Dames of Darmstadt!

I'm just trolling to get 'trout' to Post some Video! haha I don't know much about these two other than they are the female Composers most linked up with the High Modernists, both coming into prominence in the '60s, I believe. Neither has an extensive Discography, but maybe that has changed recently? From what I've heard, their work sounds as formidable as anyone's, and it's nice to have two more names to add.

'trout', it's all yours!
« Last Edit: April 10, 2014, 05:17:04 AM by snyprrr »

Offline San Antone

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8046
Re: Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2014, 03:56:16 PM »
Edith Canat de Chizy was born in 1950, so is of a different generation than Betsy Jolas, who was born in 1926.  You can easily find some of their music on YouTube.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2014, 04:21:38 PM »
Edith Canat de Chizy was born in 1950, so is of a different generation than Betsy Jolas, who was born in 1926.  You can easily find some of their music on YouTube.

what he said!

Offline torut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1014
Re: Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2014, 11:01:09 AM »
The Dames of Darmstadt!

I'm just trolling to get 'trout' to Post some Video! haha I don't know much about these two other than they are the female Composers most linked up with the High Modernists, both coming into prominence in the '60s, I believe. Neither has an extensive Discography, but maybe that has changed recently? From what I've heard, their work sounds as formidable as anyone's, and it's nice to have two more names to add.

'trout', it's all yours!
I guess you didn't mean me. ;D I noticed that there is a member Trout. Sorry for a confusing username. It was not my intention to make an anagram. "torut" as in Toru Takemitsu, although it was also not my intention. :)
I didn't know Betsy Jolas. Only one album (viola & piano) is available?
This looks interesting. Do you have it?


I also don't know about Canat de Chizy other than the string trios/solos album. That is so good that I want to check her other works such as orchestral, concertos, chamber, etc.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2014, 11:55:32 AM »
I guess you didn't mean me. ;D I noticed that there is a member Trout. Sorry for a confusing username. It was not my intention to make an anagram. "torut" as in Toru Takemitsu, although it was also not my intention. :)
I didn't know Betsy Jolas. Only one album (viola & piano) is available?
This looks interesting. Do you have it?


I also don't know about Canat de Chizy other than the string trios/solos album. That is so good that I want to check her other works such as orchestral, concertos, chamber, etc.

yea, "they" get my name wrong all the time,- savages! I thought 'petrarch' was 'petrock'...

Jolas has a "couple" of cds from Accord, one old, one new(ish-2000s). There should be something up on YT.

Well, I guess we'll discover together! ;)

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2014, 05:13:59 AM »
I guess you didn't mean me. ;D I noticed that there is a member Trout. Sorry for a confusing username. It was not my intention to make an anagram. "torut" as in Toru Takemitsu, although it was also not my intention. :)
I didn't know Betsy Jolas. Only one album (viola & piano) is available?
This looks interesting. Do you have it?


I also don't know about Canat de Chizy other than the string trios/solos album. That is so good that I want to check her other works such as orchestral, concertos, chamber, etc.

I took a look at their Amazons. Chizy has @12 listings, but about 4-5 solid releases. Aeon has her 'Complete Orchestral Works', though the Timpani disc has a Violin Concerto? Then there are some Chamber discs. Jolas has the two Accord discs (either OOP or expensive) and a new cd of her piano music called 'B is for Betsy'.- I was even surprised to see that

btw- the trios/solos album is echt Aeon- try their Boucourchliev SQs.

pjme

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2014, 10:33:05 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/jbBarRBGj3Q" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/jbBarRBGj3Q</a>

Quatuor ii with the stunning ( then youthful & stratospheric) voice of Mady Mesplé. A real poetic beauty.

<a href="http://youtube.com/v/KsMjx5uE4dU" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://youtube.com/v/KsMjx5uE4dU</a>

Stances for piano and orchestra ( movs. 2 & 3 on YT) - Claude Helffer, piano

<a href="http://youtube.com/v/NAKtPqynxLY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">http://youtube.com/v/NAKtPqynxLY</a>
« Last Edit: April 10, 2014, 10:40:26 AM by pjme »

pjme

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2014, 10:54:33 AM »
Other, forgotten babes...

Adrienne Clostre (9 October 1921 – 5 August 2006) was a French composer. She was born in Thoméry, Seine-et-Marne, and studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Yves Nat, Darius Milhaud, Jean Rivier and Oliver Messiaen.[1]
After completing her studies, Clostre worked as a composer. She won the Grand Prix de Rome in 1949, the Grand Music Prize of the City of Paris in 1955, the Florence Gould Prize in 1976 and the SACD Prix Musique in 1987

Isabelle Aboulker was born on 23 October 1938 in the Parisian suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. Her father was the Algerian-born film director and writer Marcel Aboulker and her maternal grandfather was the composer Henry Février. While following a course in composition and keyboard studies at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris, she started composing for the theatre, the cinema and television.

Sophie Lacaze (born 1963) is a French composer.
Lacaze was born in Lourdes. She studied music at the Conservatoire de Toulouse, and continued at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris, where she received the Composition Prize. Afterwards, she studied with Allain Gaussin, Philippe Manoury and Antoine Tisne in France, and with Franco Donatoni and Ennio Morricone in Italy. She also engaged in music theatre with Georges Aperghis at the Centre Acanthes, and attended Pierre Boulez's courses in Collège de France.

Thérèse Brenet (born 22 October 1935 in Paris, France) is a French composer. She studied at the Conservatoire de Reims and since 1954 [1] the Conservatoire de Paris. Among her teachers were Maurice Duruflé, Henri Dutilleux, Darius Milhaud, and Jean Rivier. In 1965 she won the Prix de Rome for her Les Visions prophétiques de Cassandre; a prize which enabled her to pursue further studies at the French Academy in Rome. She went on to win the Halphen Prize for fugue and composition and won the Coplay Foundation of Chicago's composition prize. She is also an honorary member of the National Academy of History in Reims

Jacqueline Fontyn (°1930) was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and began piano studies at the age of five years old with Ignace Bolotin. At nine years old, she began to compose small pieces, and at the age of 14, she decided to be a composer. She continued her piano studies with Marcel Maas and studied music theory and composition with Marcel Quinet in Brussels and with Max Deutsch in Paris.
She also studied orchestra conducting in Vienna with Hans Swarovski and graduated in 1959 from the Belgian Chapelle Musicale [Elisabeth. In Antwerp she founded a mixed choir Le Tympan and directed it for seven years. She conducted the Symphonic Orchestra of the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium for two years.
From 1963 to 1970 she taught counterpoint at the Royal Flemish Music Conservatory in Antwerp. From 1970 to 1990 she was a professor at the Conservatory of Brussels where she taught first counterpoint and later composition. She also taught at Georgetown University, the American University and Maryland University in Washington, D.C., and worked as a music teacher in Baltimore, Los Angeles, Cairo, Seoul and Tel Aviv.[1]

Yvonne Desportes (b. 1907, d. 1993) was a French writer and composer and daughter of Émile Desportes.
She was born in Coburg, Germany, and studied with Noel and Jean Galton, Maurice Emmanuel, Paul Dukas and Marcel Dupre at the Paris Conservatory. She won the Prix de Rome in 1932 and lived in Rome from 1933-37 at the Villa de Medicis. While there she met another Prix de Rome winner, the French sculptor Ulysse Gémignani and they married.
In 1943 she returned to Paris where she took a position teaching at the Paris Conservatory.[1] Besides teaching and working as a composer, Desportes also wrote a number of textbooks. She died in Paris in 1993

Michèle Reverdy (1943) was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and began piano lessons at age six. She studied at The Paris Conservatory with Pierre Lantier for music theory, Norbert Dufourcq for music history, Roger Boutry for harmony, Alain Weber for counterpoint, Marcel Bitsch for fugue, Claude Ballif for music analysis and Olivier Messiaen for composition. After completing her studies she took a position in 1983 teaching music analysis and orchestration at the same school and retired as Professor Emeritus.[1]
Reverdy was a resident of Casa de Velázquez in Madrid from 1979–1981 and composer-in-residence at the Conservatory of Strasbourg Musica Festival in 1993. She was a producer at Radio France from 1978 to 1992, and received a Lifetime Achievement award from Société des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique (SACEM) in 1995. She is the author of two books on Messiaen

Etc.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2014, 05:59:07 AM »
Other, forgotten babes...

Adrienne Clostre (9 October 1921 – 5 August 2006) was a French composer. She was born in Thoméry, Seine-et-Marne, and studied at the Paris Conservatoire with Yves Nat, Darius Milhaud, Jean Rivier and Oliver Messiaen.[1]
After completing her studies, Clostre worked as a composer. She won the Grand Prix de Rome in 1949, the Grand Music Prize of the City of Paris in 1955, the Florence Gould Prize in 1976 and the SACD Prix Musique in 1987

Isabelle Aboulker was born on 23 October 1938 in the Parisian suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. Her father was the Algerian-born film director and writer Marcel Aboulker and her maternal grandfather was the composer Henry Février. While following a course in composition and keyboard studies at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in Paris, she started composing for the theatre, the cinema and television.

Sophie Lacaze (born 1963) is a French composer.
Lacaze was born in Lourdes. She studied music at the Conservatoire de Toulouse, and continued at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris, where she received the Composition Prize. Afterwards, she studied with Allain Gaussin, Philippe Manoury and Antoine Tisne in France, and with Franco Donatoni and Ennio Morricone in Italy. She also engaged in music theatre with Georges Aperghis at the Centre Acanthes, and attended Pierre Boulez's courses in Collège de France.

Thérèse Brenet (born 22 October 1935 in Paris, France) is a French composer. She studied at the Conservatoire de Reims and since 1954 [1] the Conservatoire de Paris. Among her teachers were Maurice Duruflé, Henri Dutilleux, Darius Milhaud, and Jean Rivier. In 1965 she won the Prix de Rome for her Les Visions prophétiques de Cassandre; a prize which enabled her to pursue further studies at the French Academy in Rome. She went on to win the Halphen Prize for fugue and composition and won the Coplay Foundation of Chicago's composition prize. She is also an honorary member of the National Academy of History in Reims

Jacqueline Fontyn (°1930) was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and began piano studies at the age of five years old with Ignace Bolotin. At nine years old, she began to compose small pieces, and at the age of 14, she decided to be a composer. She continued her piano studies with Marcel Maas and studied music theory and composition with Marcel Quinet in Brussels and with Max Deutsch in Paris.
She also studied orchestra conducting in Vienna with Hans Swarovski and graduated in 1959 from the Belgian Chapelle Musicale [Elisabeth. In Antwerp she founded a mixed choir Le Tympan and directed it for seven years. She conducted the Symphonic Orchestra of the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium for two years.
From 1963 to 1970 she taught counterpoint at the Royal Flemish Music Conservatory in Antwerp. From 1970 to 1990 she was a professor at the Conservatory of Brussels where she taught first counterpoint and later composition. She also taught at Georgetown University, the American University and Maryland University in Washington, D.C., and worked as a music teacher in Baltimore, Los Angeles, Cairo, Seoul and Tel Aviv.[1]

Yvonne Desportes (b. 1907, d. 1993) was a French writer and composer and daughter of Émile Desportes.
She was born in Coburg, Germany, and studied with Noel and Jean Galton, Maurice Emmanuel, Paul Dukas and Marcel Dupre at the Paris Conservatory. She won the Prix de Rome in 1932 and lived in Rome from 1933-37 at the Villa de Medicis. While there she met another Prix de Rome winner, the French sculptor Ulysse Gémignani and they married.
In 1943 she returned to Paris where she took a position teaching at the Paris Conservatory.[1] Besides teaching and working as a composer, Desportes also wrote a number of textbooks. She died in Paris in 1993

Michèle Reverdy (1943) was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and began piano lessons at age six. She studied at The Paris Conservatory with Pierre Lantier for music theory, Norbert Dufourcq for music history, Roger Boutry for harmony, Alain Weber for counterpoint, Marcel Bitsch for fugue, Claude Ballif for music analysis and Olivier Messiaen for composition. After completing her studies she took a position in 1983 teaching music analysis and orchestration at the same school and retired as Professor Emeritus.[1]
Reverdy was a resident of Casa de Velázquez in Madrid from 1979–1981 and composer-in-residence at the Conservatory of Strasbourg Musica Festival in 1993. She was a producer at Radio France from 1978 to 1992, and received a Lifetime Achievement award from Société des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique (SACEM) in 1995. She is the author of two books on Messiaen

Etc.

Boy, where do you find a list like that?? Just out of curiosity, do you think there is a male name I've never heard of? I just want to know exactly HOW obscure these names are- for they are, wow, quite a list! Sophie Lacaze sounds interesting. But, one would think in this day that if they had any hidden Masterpieces that they would be recorded?

Offline torut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1014
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2014, 07:56:03 PM »
Boy, where do you find a list like that?? Just out of curiosity, do you think there is a male name I've never heard of? I just want to know exactly HOW obscure these names are- for they are, wow, quite a list! Sophie Lacaze sounds interesting. But, one would think in this day that if they had any hidden Masterpieces that they would be recorded?

Lacaze's work was posted some time ago by Philo at 21st c. thread.

For the night: Sophie Lacaze

 Voices of Australia, for solo flute and recorded voices (2002)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BA5rKI1NXHk&list=WLACC4B73F08165787

I know none of the names in the list. Interesting.

pjme

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2014, 10:43:01 AM »
Well, there are many female composers, not just Germaine Tailleferre, Jennifer Higdon or Kaija Saariaho....

sincerely,
Peter

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2014, 11:41:27 AM »
Well, there are many female composers, not just Germaine Tailleferre, Jennifer Higdon or Kaija Saariaho....

sincerely,
Peter

It's a ma-a-an, baby! ;)

pjme

  • Guest
Re: French Serial Babes!: Edith Canat de Chizy & Betsy Jolas
« Reply #12 on: April 22, 2014, 12:40:48 AM »

snyprrr

  • Guest