Author Topic: sir Malcolm Arnold  (Read 32576 times)

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Harry

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2007, 10:36:40 PM »
I bought the 3 DECCA box sets from Amazon UK, it was a pain because for whatever reason they aren't going to be released in the US and Amazon.com doesn't import them.  Thankfully it was a little bit cheaper than the advertised prices on amazon.co.uk because there is no VAT to international buyers (I'm guessing VAT is some sort of tax, that they include in their base price fro their UK buyers) I also used to have the naxos box and I still have mp3s but I sold it a while ago to buy new stuff, for whatever reason I stuck with the Handley, though the Penny is also quite good.


In addition to the 3 decca boxes (which are great!, though I wish they used clamp shell jewel cases instead of the soft boxes) and the 3 chamber music discs on hyperion shown above,  I also have these excellent Arnold CDs:


Impressive line up, and all good value! :)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2007, 02:55:51 AM »
I strongly recommend this new release of historic Arnold recordings:

http://www.play.com/Music/CD/GENBRWA/30/37/-/3298189/Arnold_Conducts_Arnold/Product.html?searchtype=genre

It is the first CD release of Arnold conducting Symphony 2 (I prefer it to the Groves; more urgent) and Symphony 1 is my favourite (Arnold takes it about 10 minutes slower than the competition, giving it a much more tragic, epic feel).  The Piano Concerto is great too as is Tam O'Shanter.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

tjguitar

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2007, 07:57:41 PM »
New Arnold disc out. Has anyone heard it?





http://www.amazon.co.uk/Arnold-Sound-Barrier-Sir-Malcolm/dp/B00006K08L

Hasnt been released in the US yet apparently.


edited to add there's another new one coming from Naxos, released in the US May 29th.

« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 07:59:23 PM by tjguitar »

Harry

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2007, 12:07:48 AM »
New Arnold disc out. Has anyone heard it?




edited to add there's another new one coming from Naxos, released in the US May 29th.



I ordered it, and it will soon be in my home.

tjguitar

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2007, 06:35:34 AM »
I ordered it, and it will soon be in my home.

I asked the Malcolm Arnold website about this CD and they responded w/ the following:


Quote
Dear TJ
 
This is indeed a new Arnold recording that has recently been released on the Naxos label!
 
You might find the following information useful:
 

"ARNOLD, M. 8.570294  NAXOS

Chamber Music for Winds

Wind Quintet Op. 2 • Duo for Two Clarinets Op. 135 • Dream City • Hobson’s Choice: Overture • Grand Fantasia • Overture • Suite Bourgeoise • You Know What Sailors Are: Scherzetto • Fantasy for Clarinet Op. 87 • Fantasy for Flute and Clarinet • Divertimento Op. 37 • 3 Shanties Op. 4

This disc includes some of Malcolm Arnold’s lesser known chamber music for wind ensemble.  The repertoire is extensive and includes the Three Shanties and Dream City for wind quintet.  One of the most exciting pieces on this CD is the Wind Quintet Opus 2, only recently rediscovered in a box of music belonging to the late Stephen Walters, a former wind player for the London Philharmonic Orchestra.  This is the world premier recording.

The East Winds unites the talents of Victoria Soames, Judith Treggor, Joseph Sanders, Jonathan Hassan and Lizbeth Elliott in their first outing on Naxos".

Offline vandermolen

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #25 on: May 10, 2007, 08:59:21 AM »
Arnold's symphonies are all well worth exploring, but I especially love the 7th Symphony. The extremely violent dissonant passages, the tragic lamentations of the 2nd movement, and the totally unexpected little Celtic dance in the conclusion -- what a piece ! (I have only heard the Penny versions of all the symphonies).

Thanks to all for the interesting info in this thread so far.

Totally agree, it is a great work.  The Vernon Handley version is my favourite. I have really come to appreciate Symphony 6 more and more with its unexpected "blues" episode and great sense of looming tragedy.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

tjguitar

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2007, 08:16:11 AM »
I ordered it, and it will soon be in my home.


Have you heard this yet Harry?

Harry

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2007, 08:25:40 AM »

Have you heard this yet Harry?

Yes I did, fine music from Arnold on the light side.
Not first class compositions, but nice enough.
Don't expect to much. :)

Offline PerfectWagnerite

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2007, 01:26:59 PM »
Arnold is certainly more interesting than Telemann for example. Nobody is as un-interesting or as light as Telemann,.

Offline 71 dB

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2007, 02:35:55 PM »
Arnold is certainly more interesting than Telemann for example. Nobody is as un-interesting or as light as Telemann,.

I think it's safe to say Telemann is more interesting than Giovanni Buonaventura Viviani;D
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Offline techniquest

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2007, 11:17:54 PM »
I have the Naxos 'white box' set and agree with what has already been said about it - wonderful collection. I especially love the 5th symphony, and in particular the jaunty 3rd movement which, after a restless opening and bouncy, aggressive brass and strings suddenly becomes a lovely skipping 'half tune' on the woodwinds backed by lovely string chords - sunny summer day music :)
I have always loved the Piano Concerto for Three Hands and I really think it would be a great Last Night of the Proms piece with it's ott orchestration and fabulous tunes (it was a Proms commission after all); the best recording is the one with Phyllis Sellick and Cyril Smith at the pianos (for whom it was written).


Hector

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2007, 04:32:56 AM »
I think it's safe to say Telemann is more interesting than Giovanni Buonaventura Viviani;D

Who?

However, I doubt it.

Telemann is played in multi-storey car parks at night to deter anti-social behaviour.

It works!

I bet you cannot say that of Viviani.

Offline techniquest

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #32 on: June 23, 2007, 10:23:50 AM »
On the new program "Classical Britannia" last night on BBC4, there was a tiny bit of footage of Arnold conducting his own Grand, Grand Overture - specifically the part with the vacuum cleaners and rifles. How I would love to see all of that performance!

Offline Sef

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #33 on: April 09, 2009, 03:02:33 PM »
I don't believe that I have heard one piece by this composer. However, in the late 70s I was at school in Northampton playing my Deep Purple Concerto for Group and Orchestra LP when some gentleman I didn't know started asking me all sorts of questions about it. Afterwards someone told me that it was Malcolm Arnold. I have absolutely no idea if they were pulling my leg or being totally serious. It was so long ago I don't remember much about it at all. Still, ranks alongside getting a kiss from Olivia Newton John at the airport when she was returning from the Eurovision song contest in 1974!
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Offline Benji

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #34 on: April 09, 2009, 03:22:12 PM »
I don't believe that I have heard one piece by this composer. However, in the late 70s I was at school in Northampton playing my Deep Purple Concerto for Group and Orchestra LP when some gentleman I didn't know started asking me all sorts of questions about it. Afterwards someone told me that it was Malcolm Arnold. I have absolutely no idea if they were pulling my leg or being totally serious. It was so long ago I don't remember much about it at all. Still, ranks alongside getting a kiss from Olivia Newton John at the airport when she was returning from the Eurovision song contest in 1974!

Lucky you! I would have loved to meet Sir Malcolm. He had a keen interest in pop tunes, forms of which often find their way into his music.

If you want a recommendation, let me know what you like in the way of other composers and i'll point you in the right direction! The 5th Symphony is always a good starting point I think and contains within it everything that is great about Arnold. There is a great recording on EMI conducted by the composer.

Offline Sef

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #35 on: April 09, 2009, 03:43:57 PM »
Lucky you! I would have loved to meet Sir Malcolm. He had a keen interest in pop tunes, forms of which often find their way into his music.

If you want a recommendation, let me know what you like in the way of other composers and i'll point you in the right direction! The 5th Symphony is always a good starting point I think and contains within it everything that is great about Arnold. There is a great recording on EMI conducted by the composer.
My favorites were recently described as the music that died after the war. Tonal with bite and jagged edges! From Mahler, Sibelius, Atterberg through Saygun to Hartmann to Pettersson. Where does Arnold fit into there?
"Do you think that I could have composed what I have composed, do you think that one can write a single note with life in it if one sits there and pities oneself?"

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2009, 04:35:20 PM »
Mahler and Sibelius are the two composers Arnold most admired :) There are very considerable echoes of both composers in Arnold's music: Sibelius in the earlier symphonies and Mahlerian angst in the later ones. If you like Pettersson then the haunted, bitter, angry 7th and 8th Symphonies should appeal to you. The concertos, on the other hand, are mainly much lighter works.

Offline snyprrr

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #37 on: April 09, 2009, 04:40:12 PM »
STRING QUARTETS: Arnold VS. Alwyn

anyone? How does Arnold No.2 compare with Britten No.3?

Also, of the 3 Arnold's (Naxos, Chandos, Guild), which would you recommend?

I've got Philip Jones doing the Sym for Brass.  GREAT!!!
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Offline jowcol

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #38 on: April 09, 2009, 06:10:12 PM »
I just have to chime in-- picking up the Naxos set of Symphonies is a good idea.  I didn't have the $$ to pursue the rest, but this was a strong cycle.

One thing about Arnold's symphonies-- you have to get ready for the sudden mood swings.   He's not one to endlessly develop a theme.

 His writing for brass is excellent-- his orchestration grabs you very quickly.

I'd rank 5 as my very favorite-- it's the one that is the most structurally satisfying, and ending is haunting.  Symphony  7 mines some dark terrain, and has a lot of really violent juxtapositions, but it's not wallowing in self pity.   Easily my second favorite, and one that keeps pulling me back.  6 is a fun one- the jazzy interlude has  very sinister undertone.   2 and 4 are solid.  1 and 3 I'll need to spend more time with. 

I'll need to listen to 8 again-- it's a bit knotty, but didn't have the "in your face" quality that the 7th did.

I must admit I haven't yet opened to 9-- it  is much more subdued, and elegaic, but I plan to give it more listenings.

I've not regretted a single purchase-- particularly at the Naxos prices!

If you have succumbed to the madness of collecting symphonic cycles by British 20th century composers, Arnold certainly belongs up there with Alwyn, Rubbra, and Bax!
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Offline Dundonnell

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Re: sir Malcolm Arnold
« Reply #39 on: April 09, 2009, 06:29:01 PM »
I love Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 5-very Sibelian though they are :) Nos. 7 and 8 are tough works, written at a time of quite appalling personal circumstances for the composer.

Give No.9 more listening time though. It is really a quite astonishing work and its early neglect, indeed the scorn and derision which initially greeted the work, was scandalous. After three short, apparently inconsequential movements in Arnold's 'light' style there follows that extremely moving, long adagio finale which seems to provide an entirely apposite coda to Arnold's turbulent life. It is so seemingly simple, yet so profoundly elegiac that it never fails to move me emotionally. Penney's Naxos recording of the 9th(made in the presence of the composer) is the most impressive thing that both conductor and his Irish orchestra have done to date, in my opinion.

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