Author Topic: Gaetano Donizetti's Laboratorio  (Read 1350 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Gaetano Donizetti's Laboratorio
« on: July 17, 2014, 08:59:04 PM »
I'm far from an expert in the field of Opera - probably the bottom of my classical listening taste - but even those composers known mostly for their opera's or considered strictly working in that field had their moments outside of opera (aka Siegfried Idyll) - here's a lovely little number from Donizetti:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E7Pm7cl13c

He wrote a number of chamber works, piano pieces, and orchestral compositions, very lyrical in content, if not breaking new ground.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

snyprrr

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Re: Gaetano Donizetti's Laboratorio
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2014, 11:04:58 AM »
Any of that CPO String Quartet Cycle got what it takes? He wrote a bunch around 1820.

Offline Scion7

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Re: Gaetano Donizetti's Laboratorio
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2014, 04:02:31 PM »
I don't have any of those - only a smattering of his music - I have the Solsti Italiani's 3rd and 5th - well-structured, melodious affairs.  Don't look for Beethoven, Brahms, Bartok or Schubert in these - they are 2nd tier, but nicely done.  If Verdi had written more instrumental pieces I think they'd be interesting, as his operas are not to my taste.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal