Author Topic: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)  (Read 2123 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« on: August 21, 2014, 03:27:56 AM »
• born in Deutschlandsberg district of Styria, Austria, February 15, 1847
• died in Vienna, February 19, 1927
• conductor of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde
• professor at the Vienna conservatory
• taught musicians such as: Ernst Decsey, Mahler, Sibelius, Franz Schmidt, Schreker, Wolf and Zemlinsky
• friend of Brahms, who was impressed by the Symphony No.1 in C - Fuchs won the Beethoven prize for it by the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in 1886

Chamber Music
=============================


Clarinet Quintet in E, Op.102
4 string qtartets: in E, op.58 (Leipzig, 1897), in a, op.62 (Berlin, 1899), in C, op.71 (Vienna, 1903), in A, op.106, ed. (Vienna, 1934);
Strint Trio in A, op.94 (Berlin, 1912);
3 terzets, for 2 violins & viola in E, in D, both as op.61 (Berlin, 1898), c, op.107 (Vienna, 1923);
Duet for 2 violins
Duet for violin & viola
2 Piano Quartets, in g, op.15 (Leipzig, 1876), in b, op.75 (Vienna, 1905);
2 Piano Trios, in C, op.22 (Leipzig, 1879), in B, op.72 (Vienna, 1903);
7 Fantasy Pieces, for Violin, Viola & Piano op.57 (Berlin, 1897);
Trio in f, for violin, viola, & piano, op.115 (Vienna, 1926);
6 violin sonatas, in f, op.20 (Leipzig, 1878), in D, op.33 (Leipzig, 1883), in d, op.68 (Leipzig, 1902), in E, op.77 (Vienna, 1905), in A, op.95 (Vienna, 1913), in g, op.103 (Vienna, ?1923); 
Viola Sonata in d, op.86 (Vienna, 1909),
2 Cello sonatas, in d, op.29 (Leipzig, 1881), in e, op.83 (Vienna, 1908),
Sonata in Db for Piano & Cello
Sonata in g, op.97 (Vienna, 1913)

Piano Music
=============================


3 Piano sonatas, in G, op.19 (Leipzig, ?1877), in g, op.88 (Vienna, c1910), in D, op.109 (Vienna, ?1923);
Variations in g, op.13 (Leipzig, ?1876);
Variations in  d, pf 4 hands, op.10 (Leipzig, ?1874)

Prelude and Fugue, for organ                                                                  Orchestral Music
3 fantasias for organ, in C, op.87, in e, op.91, in D, op.101;                       ========================================
Harp Fantasia in G, op.85 (Vienna, ?1908)                                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                           Piano Concerto in b-flat, Op.23

                                                                                                           Symphony No.1 in C, Op.37 (Berlin, 1885)
                                                                                                           Symphony No.2 in E, Op.45 (Berlin, 1887)
                                                                                                           Symphony No.3 in E, Op.79 (Vienna, 1907)
                                                                                                           2 symphonies WoO
                                                                                                           
                                                                                                           Serenades, No.1 - 5, Op.9-Op.14-Op.21-Op.51-Op.53

                                                                                                           Andante grazioso and Capriccio, for strings, Op.63 (Leipzig, 1900)
                                                                                                           Overture: Des Meeres und der Liebe Wellen, Op.59 (Leipzig, 1897)

Operas
================

Die Königsbraut, in 3 acts, Op.46 (1889) (librettist: Ignaz Schnitzer) premiered in Vienna[4]
Die Teufelsglocke, in 3 acts (w/o Op.) (1891) (librettist: Bernhard Buchbinder)
Choral works
================

Mass in G, Op. 108
Mass in D minor, Op. 116
Mass in F, without opus number

Solid composer in the Schubert/Schumann/Brahms tradition.    :)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 03:30:24 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2014, 03:29:37 AM »
« Last Edit: August 21, 2014, 03:32:25 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2014, 03:33:21 AM »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline amw

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2014, 03:40:29 AM »
The first piano sonata has something to recommend it in my opinion (it has a vein of lyricism I find appealing, though not the most dramatic or concise of works)—the pianistically inclined may try it out here: http://imslp.org/wiki/Piano_Sonata_No.1,_Op.19_(Fuchs,_Robert)

The rest of his compositions that I've heard have not impressed me, not even as much as Gernsheim or Röntgen, but I might give some of the chamber music a second look eventually.

Online Brian

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2014, 06:04:17 AM »
The string serenades are in order, that is, No. 1 is the best and they decrease in charm and increase in unoriginality as the series advances. One exception is the late serenade (I forget which) that ends in an absurd Johann Strauss parody.

Online Brian

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2014, 06:48:33 AM »
The first piano sonata has something to recommend it in my opinion (it has a vein of lyricism I find appealing, though not the most dramatic or concise of works)—the pianistically inclined may try it out here: http://imslp.org/wiki/Piano_Sonata_No.1,_Op.19_(Fuchs,_Robert)
Just listened. You didn't mention the surprise twist - that a piece that starts so pastorally could end in a minor key!

Offline amw

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2014, 12:06:38 PM »
Just listened. You didn't mention the surprise twist - that a piece that starts so pastorally could end in a minor key!

Spoilers!! ::)

I'd like to check out some of those MDG string quartet issues, eventually. The 1st Quartet looks similar to the 1st Sonata in both respects.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2020, 02:44:30 PM »
Well, going through my collection, Robert Fuchs (1847-1927) is up for a listening (will be culling and/or adding) - at the moment, I have the recordings below, many of which have received excellent reviews (see attachment, if interested).  In perusing Amazon, there is a 2nd Naxos disc of the remaining Serenades (available on Spotify); I'm also interested in the String Quartets, now offered in a 2-disc MDG set.

SO, a one page thread started (and ending!) in 2014 - appears that this composer is worth a little more attention - please provide thoughts and recommendations - Dave :)

   

   
« Last Edit: February 20, 2020, 03:44:36 PM by SonicMan46 »

Offline André

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2021, 06:15:40 PM »

I just bought his 3rd symphony on the Thorofon label. It will be my first encounter with any of Fuchs’ music.

He was well acquainted with Brahms, who praised his works. In 1875 he taught at the Vienna Conservatoire. Over the years his pupils were to include Enescu, Korngold,  Mahler, Schmidt Sibelius, Wolf and Zemlinsky. It seems that Fuchs was better known as a teacher than as a composer. He disdained self-promoting and showed little interest in seeing his works performed.

I read this in a program note of the American Symphony Orchestra’s website:

Quote

Putting aside inaccurate and dyspeptic dictionary entries, Fuchs was a polished and fluent composer whose attractive and often touching music struck a civilized compromise between fervid romanticism and poised classicism. Brahms has often been rightly cited as an influence upon Fuchs’ style, but Fuchs’ pellucid orchestration derives from Mendelssohn while his harmonic practice is often reminiscent of Schumann’s inimitable idiom. Furthermore, Fuchs’ counterpoint is extraordinarily elegant: the subtle interplay of his textures is invariably expert and assured. If anything, Fuchs’ music is too beautifully made: the surface perfection is so seductive as to obscure the romantic heart that beats beneath the exquisitely tailored vest

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2021, 06:24:36 PM »
It's been some years I listened to the symphonies. As far as I remember, I found the 3rd like the least interesting of them. The CPO CD with the symphonies 1 and 2 is the best entry to this composer apart from the CDs of the serenades.
«Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!»

Carl Nielsen

Offline Florestan

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2021, 02:13:19 AM »
his harmonic practice is often reminiscent of Schumann’s inimitable idiom

This makes no sense at all.

TD

Besides the serenades, I quite like Fuch's chamber music and piano sonatas, although his SQs badly need another recording than the Minguet which is bland and lifeless.
What is Music? How do you define it? Music is a calm moonlit night, the rustle of leaves in Summer. Music is the far off peal of bells at dusk! Music comes straight from the heart and talks only to the heart: it is Love!  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2021, 04:28:01 AM »
I don't know Robert Fuchs music at all; however, yesterday I was listening to a piece by the contemporary American composer Kenneth Fuchs and am curious as to whether or not they were related.  I saw that Robert had a brother (via Wiki) who was also a composer and a music teacher too.  I also noted that they both died in Austria but didn't see any information as to whether or not either of them had any children, etc.  And there's not much helpful info regarding Kenneth Fuchs.

Probably just a coincidence, but I was wondering whether or not anyone might have any more info here.  :)

PD

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2021, 07:54:27 AM »
I don't know Robert Fuchs music at all; however, yesterday I was listening to a piece by the contemporary American composer Kenneth Fuchs and am curious as to whether or not they were related.  I saw that Robert had a brother (via Wiki) who was also a composer and a music teacher too.  I also noted that they both died in Austria but didn't see any information as to whether or not either of them had any children, etc.  And there's not much helpful info regarding Kenneth Fuchs.

Probably just a coincidence, but I was wondering whether or not anyone might have any more info here.  :)

PD
Hey PD - well, I doubt there is a relationship, but don't know - K. Fuchs has a website HERE; the page below shows a 'Contacts' option which lists several email addresses - you could send him a quick note and ask?  Dave :)


Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2021, 08:12:28 AM »
Fuchs Complete String Quartets w/ the Minguet Quartet - when I put my February 2020 post together w/ the composer's recordings in my collection, the String Quartets below were not included because I decided to purchase the 2-CD set from Amazon the same day - so now giving them another spin - these are genial harmonious works that provide pleasant listening - multiple reviews are attached for those interested.  Dave :)

P.S. I still do not own the 2nd Serenades disc shown below - maybe another purchase or DL?

 
« Last Edit: March 04, 2021, 08:14:39 AM by SonicMan46 »

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2021, 08:25:09 AM »
Hey PD - well, I doubt there is a relationship, but don't know - K. Fuchs has a website HERE; the page below shows a 'Contacts' option which lists several email addresses - you could send him a quick note and ask?  Dave :)


Thanks for the suggestion.  I had found his website earlier.  :)

PD

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Robert Fuchs (1847-1927)
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2021, 10:44:00 AM »
Fuchs - Serenades 3, 4, 5 w/ Christian Ludwig & the Cologne Chamber Orchestra - well as stated in my last post, I had the Naxos V. 1 of the Serenades, so just did a $7 MP3 DL (320 Kbps) purchase from PrestoClassical (included the digital booklet) - burned to a CD-R and now listening on my den speakers - these are delightful works and well performed/recorded - highly recommended - excellent reviews attached.  Dave :)