Author Topic: Italian Music from the Late Renaissance and Baroque  (Read 50188 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Italian Music from the Late Renaissance and Baroque
« Reply #220 on: August 04, 2017, 05:58:31 AM »

Just one other thing about Aymes which I just noticed, I'm listening as I'm doing this, is that the some of the pieces seem to be arranged for clavioganum and harp, and this brings out the emotional melodic content very well.

You can see I'm really enjoying it! ill probably play it again in a month and wonder what all the fuss was about!

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Florestan

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Re: Italian Music from the Late Renaissance and Baroque
« Reply #221 on: August 04, 2017, 06:13:39 AM »
You can see I'm really enjoying it!

And I'm glad for you, honestly!

I might actually have a problem with the harpsichord itself. Although I can tolerate it for fairly extended periods of time in the repertoire which appeals to me, I vastly prefer the piano.  :D
Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools. - Romans 1:22, KJV

Offline bioluminescentsquid

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Re: Italian Music from the Late Renaissance and Baroque
« Reply #222 on: August 04, 2017, 09:04:18 PM »


      



The above definition of minimalism suggests that Storace's Pastorale is the earliest piece of minimalist music. A simple short motif repeated with small variation and without goal over a pedal point, without aim. It is long - about 10 minutes.

It's a tremendous piece of music, which in some sense makes me think of the Bach violin chaconne and Beethoven's Grosse Fugue.

I have three recordings of the whole the thing, Cera, Alessandrini and Bonizzoni. Cera uses organ and percussion, while Bonizzoni and Alessandrini use just the organ. Alessandrini (in 150 years of Italian Music, I haven't heard his Storace CD yet, it's on the way hopefully) is somehow the most avant garde modern sounding; the percussion on Cera's makes for an attractive crazy dance feeling; Bonizzoni's is IMO the least successful of the three, but is nevertheless interesting because of the soaring intensity of the playing in the central section. All three are wonderful.

Just listened to this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XToncb7-1gs
Interesting little piece. I think it is much like the Scarlatti Sonata recently in the blind comparison, but taken to its logical conclusion. In some way, I feel this is more the birth of the Galant than of Minimalism.

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