Author Topic: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography  (Read 25399 times)

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Online Pat B

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #320 on: January 23, 2016, 05:51:14 PM »
Here is another great Liszt recording not yet mentioned.

Good call! I got that a little while ago and just realized it's in my "only listened once" pile. I listen to it tonight.

Offline Spineur

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #321 on: January 28, 2016, 12:40:00 PM »
Via Crucis is a beautiful composition written by Franz Liszt at the end of his life.  It mixes piano and Gregorian singing which in his times was quite daring.  Its been discussed in other GMG threads so, I will simply share with you my admiration for this recording


which I downloaded in hires on qobuz.  This group "Vox Clamantis" delivers all the tension and the compassion expressed in this beautiful composition.

There seems to be some quotes from the "harmonies poetiques et religieuses" in Via Crucis.  Anybody knows the history  behind the composition of these two works ?
« Last Edit: January 28, 2016, 12:42:43 PM by Spineur »
A woman voice glides like the wind
Of black, of damp, of night
And all it touches in this flight
Suddenly is over.

Anna Akhomatova

Offline Angelos_05

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #322 on: January 30, 2016, 08:59:21 AM »
I have a very fiery linking to Liszt's piano works, as I do for his pupils : Carl Tausig, August Stradal, Moriz Rosenthal, Eugen D'Albert, Hans Von Bulow, 
However, I also have a special fondness for Liszt's orchestral oeuvres.




http://www.capriccio.at/franz-liszt-orchestral-pieces
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2005/Aug05/liszt_masterpieces_49450.htm
http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/liszt-dante-symphonie-mr0002728158
Capriccio recorded  the very rare orchestral version of À la Chapelle Sixtine S. 360 (LW G26)

http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=C7%200090
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=C1%200736
http://www.theclassicalshop.net/Details.aspx?CatalogueNumber=C4%209450







http://www.allmusic.com/album/release/liszt-l%C3%A9gendes-no1-2-cantico-del-sol-di-san-francesco-dassisi-mr0002113585
http://www.gerd-albrecht.com/franz-liszt-sonnenhymnus-des-hl-franziskus-franziskus-legenden/






http://classicalsource.com/db_control/db_cd_review.php?id=9019
http://www.hyperion-records.co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA67856
http://www.classical-music.com/review/liszt-funeral-odes








http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2002/Dec02/Liszt_SymphonicPoems.htm
https://www.hungarotonmusic.com/classical/symphonic-poems-p1813.html







http://www.allmusic.com/album/liszthungarian-rhapsodies-nos-1-6-r%C3%A1k%C3%B3czy-march-ungarischer-sturmmarsch-mw0001342975






http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/m/msr01210a.php






https://www.hungarotonmusic.com/classical/leo-weiner-original-p3918.html


===================================================================================================
And of course, a couple of recordings involving Liszt's piano output.


http://www.audaud.com/wagner-and-the-piano-severin-von-eckardstein-p-mdgmagic-fire-and-other-wagner-transcriptions-risto-matti-marin-p-alba/
http://www.sa-cd.net/showtitle/8762
http://www.sa-cd.net/showtitle/8628
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/Sept13/Wagner_transcriptions_ABCD353.htm





http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-7902/
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Nov01/Homage.htm




http://www.alba.fi/en/shop/products/4278




http://www.alba.fi/en/shop/products/4733



http://www.alba.fi/en/shop/products/4324





http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2010/June10/Liszt_Stradal_Tocc0035.htm
https://toccataclassics.com/product/liszt-stradal-symphonic-poems-1/



http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2013/May13/Liszt_transcriptions_TOCC0092.htm
https://toccataclassics.com/product/liszt-stradal-symphonic-poems-2/
« Last Edit: February 01, 2016, 03:41:40 AM by Angelos_05 »

Offline Florestan

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #323 on: October 05, 2016, 02:25:09 AM »
High time to bump this thread.



Vol. 26 (2 CDs) of the Leslie Howard Complete Piano Music series.

In general, this or that composer´s juvenilia and early works often get a dismissive treatment, as irrelevant and uninteresting trifles. This might be true in some cases, but certainly not in Liszt´s (nor Mozart´s, for that matter). And the best evidence for that is the fact that in his mature years he incessantly reworked and recycled themes or even whole works from his youth, finding in them an inexhaustible reservoir of inspiration. Young Liszt certainly had ideas which mature Liszt used time and again.

The most consistent of the lot are the Twelve Etudes op. 6, S 136 (if you think Hoboken numbering is confusing, try Searle: it´s baffling), which later were to become the Douze Etudes d´execution transcedentale, composed in 1826, and the Apparitions S 155, from 1834, which contain the first version of Liebestraeume No. 2. I wonder how many of those who dismiss on principle (or rather prejudice) any juvenilia would infer, upon hearing the former without any background information, that they are the work of a 15-year teen?

To be sure, there are many feuillets d´album, variations and other minor pieces here which are not profound or challenging, but then again neither they were meant to be: Liszt composed them for his own pleasure, and charming undoubtedly they are. One can imagine the boy sitting at the piano, coming up with a little waltz or bagatelle.

The soundworld of the works recorded here is not always recognizably Lisztian but always unmistakably Romantic, a mixture of poetry and elan painted on the canvas of youthful dreams and hopes.

Excellent sonics and performance. Highly recommended.

Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.Victor Hugo

Offline sanantonio

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #324 on: October 05, 2016, 02:26:33 AM »
High time to bump this thread.



Vol. 26 (2 CDs) of the Leslie Howard Complete Piano Music series.

In general, this or that composer´s juvenilia and early works often get a dismissive treatment, as irrelevant and uninteresting trifles. This might be true in some cases, but certainly not in Liszt´s (nor Mozart´s, for that matter). And the best evidence for that is the fact that in his mature years he incessantly reworked and recycled themes or even whole works from his youth, finding in them an inexhaustible reservoir of inspiration. Young Liszt certainly had ideas which mature Liszt used time and again.

The most consistent of the lot are the Twelve Etudes op. 6, S 136 (if you think Hoboken numbering is confusing, try Searle: it´s baffling), which later were to become the Douze Etudes d´execution transcedentale, composed in 1826, and the Apparitions S 155, from 1834, which contain the first version of Liebestraeume No. 2. I wonder how many of those who dismiss on principle (or rather prejudice) any juvenilia would infer, upon hearing the former without any background information, that they are the work of a 15-year teen?

To be sure, there are many feuillets d´album, variations and other minor pieces here which are not profound or challenging, but then again neither they were meant to be: Liszt composed them for his own pleasure, and charming undoubtedly they are. One can imagine the boy sitting at the piano, coming up with a little waltz or bagatelle.

The soundworld of the works recorded here is not always recognizably Lisztian but always unmistakably Romantic, a mixture of poetry and elan painted on the canvas of youthful dreams and hopes.

Excellent sonics and performance. Highly recommended.

I still have his complete Liszt in my shopping cart at Hyperion.  One of these days ....

 ;)

Offline Florestan

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #325 on: October 05, 2016, 02:33:08 AM »
I still have his complete Liszt in my shopping cart at Hyperion.  One of these days ....

 ;)

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Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.Victor Hugo

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #326 on: October 05, 2016, 02:33:14 AM »
I still have his complete Liszt in my shopping cart at Hyperion.  One of these days ....

 ;)

If the price dips, let a chap know  ;)
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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #327 on: October 05, 2016, 02:33:56 AM »
It´s a monumental endeavour, a true work of love.

You are the second friend of mine whom I know to have invested in this set  :)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #328 on: January 26, 2017, 09:22:39 PM »
I bought the disc below primarily for a complete set (of four) of the Valses oubliée. The Valses are highly obtuse in nature, venturing far afield from Liszt's "madcap showman" persona. This is exploratory Liszt, and there's no finer Liszt. 

Sham's playing is superlative, feeling her way around these works with a sure hand, working the obtuseness to its fullest.

But there's a novelty to this disc. Eight of the eighteen tracks are played on two "period" pianos, one an 1840 London Érard grand and the other an 1845 Paris Érard grand. According to the booklet notes, Liszt favored an Érard and loved working with the latest and greatest the company had to offer as upgrades became available.

Frankly, I could have done without them. Fortunately the Valses (along with the remaining six the works) are played on a modern Steinway.

I don't levy my criticism of the period pianos lightly. The "plain-n-simple" of it is the period pianos lack the nuance ability of the modern Steinway. I find zero of the "hidden insight" into the pieces purported to be virtually unattainable without the use of a period instrument. On the contrary, I find immense insight listening to the modern Steinway and frankly got bored with the period pianos.

The period pianos simply can't match the modern Steinway in important areas such as shading, finely-etched nuance, and color. Not to sound patronizing but it's no wonder Liszt favored all the upgrades in pianos throughout his career! :blank:

However, it's the REST of the disc which gets the highest recommendation. To put Sham to the test I played a live Valse oubliée no. 4 from Cziffra, thinking surely she'd be schooled by an old master at Liszt, only to find it's the young lady who could do some schooling of her own (actually they're both excellent, just different). 

So get this disc. The playing is up to snuff (no matter which piano is used) and obviously the period pianos might make much more of an impact on a someone with perhaps a more sympathetic ear.



 
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #329 on: January 28, 2017, 09:43:17 PM »
Another gorgeously played (and recorded) recital disc, the highlight being the uniquely sublime second Légende, S.175, depicting St. Francis of Paola crossing a body of water using only his cloak and staff.

Liszt plumbs the depths of his descriptive powers and produces wave after wave (no pun, really) of disorienting mood-thrashing effects.

One of his greatest works bar none.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #330 on: January 29, 2017, 03:27:20 AM »
Another gorgeously played (and recorded) recital disc, the highlight being the uniquely sublime second Légende, S.175, depicting St. Francis of Paola crossing a body of water using only his cloak and staff.

Liszt plumbs the depths of his descriptive powers and produces wave after wave (no pun, really) of disorienting mood-thrashing effects.

One of his greatest works bar none.

You are posting some Liszt I will need to check out, and of some works I've not heard too much.

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #331 on: January 29, 2017, 06:17:21 AM »
For all you Liszt collectors, the three volume bio by Alan Walker is a must have:



https://www.amazon.com/Franz-Liszt-Virtuoso-Years-1811-1847/dp/0801494214

I am the proud owner of 3 hardbacks, bought a few years ago.
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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #332 on: January 29, 2017, 06:40:03 AM »
For all you Liszt collectors, the three volume bio by Alan Walker is a must have:



https://www.amazon.com/Franz-Liszt-Virtuoso-Years-1811-1847/dp/0801494214

I am the proud owner of 3 hardbacks, bought a few years ago.

I bought the eBooks last year and have read parts of them depending upon which work I am interested in at the moment.  I agree, the best out there for Liszt.

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #333 on: January 29, 2017, 05:33:27 PM »
You are posting some Liszt I will need to check out, and of some works I've not heard too much.

Yes, there's lots to explore!
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #334 on: January 30, 2017, 10:06:08 AM »

For all you Liszt collectors, the three volume bio by Alan Walker is a must have:



https://www.amazon.com/Franz-Liszt-Virtuoso-Years-1811-1847/dp/0801494214

I am the proud owner of 3 hardbacks, bought a few years ago.

I bought the eBooks last year and have read parts of them depending upon which work I am interested in at the moment.  I agree, the best out there for Liszt.

I have the e-book edition, too.  Need to read it!  Maybe now that I've finally laid the Pickwick Papers to rest . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #335 on: February 14, 2017, 09:13:53 PM »
Earlier on this thread I wrote about Pascal Amoyel's spectacular recording of Harmonies Poétiques et Religieuses. Well here's another, purchased after I saw Todd list it on the WAYLT thread. It is a complete 180º from Amoyel. If Amoyel is something of a tonic, Favorin is a twisting sand storm. There's more impulse, with more dramatically infused visions of the other-world with Favorin, telling a tale in sounds to send shivers.

NOT that he displaces Amoyel (and not that he's trying to). But such a singular vision of the music cries out to be heard.





Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #336 on: March 19, 2017, 05:51:37 PM »
Another off-the-beaten-track Liszt disc, a disc which I mentioned some time ago on the WAYLT thread. Just posting it here for a little more permanence. 

Late Liszt is like no other Liszt. Generations have passed without this small epoch in Liszt's timeline making much of an impact. And according to Ms. Krausz, the reason for this isn't solely due to the public's allergy to it. Musicians themselves have needed time to really wrap their heads around the utter obtuseness of it.

Thankfully things are changing. What's also changing is the impression that the obtuseness of the music is just an end in itself. Familiarity is bringing a new clarity on just what Liszt is attempting to say in this phase. It goes without saying there's nothing, zilch, nada of the swashbuckling. Instead, the lights have been turned on to what is a singularly shadowy yet sophisticated world (so to speak).

Hearing it is best. Deciphering it is up to the listener! 8)



 
« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 06:58:27 PM by Dancing Divertimentian »
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline sanantonio

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #337 on: March 21, 2017, 02:06:03 AM »
Another off-the-beaten-track Liszt disc, a disc which I mentioned some time ago on the WAYLT thread. Just posting it here for a little more permanence. 

Late Liszt is like no other Liszt. Generations have passed without this small epoch in Liszt's timeline making much of an impact. And according to Ms. Krausz, the reason for this isn't solely due to the public's allergy to it. Musicians themselves have needed time to really wrap their heads around the utter obtuseness of it.

Thankfully things are changing. What's also changing is the impression that the obtuseness of the music is just an end in itself. Familiarity is bringing a new clarity on just what Liszt is attempting to say in this phase. It goes without saying there's nothing, zilch, nada of the swashbuckling. Instead, the lights have been turned on to what is a singularly shadowy yet sophisticated world (so to speak).

Hearing it is best. Deciphering it is up to the listener! 8)





I have been listening to this disc for the last month, I think after seeing your post in the listening thread, and enjoying it quite a lot.  Thanks for posting it here.

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #338 on: March 21, 2017, 02:13:54 AM »
For all you Liszt collectors, the three volume bio by Alan Walker is a must have:



https://www.amazon.com/Franz-Liszt-Virtuoso-Years-1811-1847/dp/0801494214

I am the proud owner of 3 hardbacks, bought a few years ago.
I am also the proud owner, as well as ashamed non-reader (so far) of this set.

I should get to it soon... very soon...
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Franz Liszt - A Critical Discography
« Reply #339 on: March 21, 2017, 07:08:01 PM »
I have been listening to this disc for the last month, I think after seeing your post in the listening thread, and enjoying it quite a lot.  Thanks for posting it here.

Thanks, yes, it deserves its time in the limelight. :)

Another peach of a (mostly) late-Liszt disc is the Fiorentino disc below. The playing is totally sympathetic to the uniqueness of the music but unfortunately it's in pretty dated sound, which is not even up to mid-'60s standards. Obviously, though, the playing trumps all.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

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