Author Topic: jessop's compositions  (Read 15387 times)

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Online aleazk

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Re: jessop's compositions
« Reply #240 on: Today at 05:14:25 PM »
Seems legit. I do similar things. The only thing I would say is that your final chord seems to have just too many notes. I think it would be difficult to hear the intervallic nuances if you just play it at once... the risk is that it may end sounding close to a cluster, you don't want that. Maybe playing it arpeggiated, even as some sort of melodic line, could be the most effective way of using it. Or maybe play one half of the chord first and then the other. For example, one can hear the intervallic relations in Webern because the writing is very austere. On the other hand, sometimes in Boulez I often hear his chords as clusters because they have just too many notes.

Another thing I do is to apply similar operations to all the voices in a polyphony... in this way, you get a weave that evolves at the pace of the original melodies in the texture but which becomes richer and richer in harmony. Some sort of controlled successions of chords of the type you have here.

Offline jessop

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Re: jessop's compositions
« Reply #241 on: Today at 05:58:19 PM »
Seems legit. I do similar things. The only thing I would say is that your final chord seems to have just too many notes. I think it would be difficult to hear the intervallic nuances if you just play it at once... the risk is that it may end sounding close to a cluster, you don't want that. Maybe playing it arpeggiated, even as some sort of melodic line, could be the most effective way of using it. Or maybe play one half of the chord first and then the other. For example, one can hear the intervallic relations in Webern because the writing is very austere. On the other hand, sometimes in Boulez I often hear his chords as clusters because they have just too many notes.

Another thing I do is to apply similar operations to all the voices in a polyphony... in this way, you get a weave that evolves at the pace of the original melodies in the texture but which becomes richer and richer in harmony. Some sort of controlled successions of chords of the type you have here.

Yep actually I never have all the notes playing at once. I agree that it can sound a bit too much like a cluster, but also, on the practical side of things, there is a maximum number of notes that a string quartet plus a guitar can play at any one time. Due to the physical impossibilities of having the entire chord sound at once it has indeed given me the opportunity to consider how I can split these chords up.

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