Author Topic: Instrumental music from the 16th century and before  (Read 5099 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Instrumental music from the 16th century and before
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2019, 07:47:36 PM »


The combination of violin and double bass sounds wonderful, no doubt partly because of the Pythagorean tuning. The playing is immaculate: expressive and very conctroled. There’s some considerable variation too, variation of attack for example. The Machaut sequence ends with an enormous thing - a 7 minute long piece, where they use every trick in the book to hold your attention.  The de Vitry Transcriptions are no less impressive than the Machaut.

The music sometimes made me think of John Cage’s Appartment House performances by Irvine Arditti.

It’s tempting to say that these transcriptions are pointless, that you can just listen to the songs as intended. But in fact they are pleasing in a Cage way, which in itself is a bit surprising, and that’s justification enough I think.

If anyone finds the booklet online can they let me have a link please.

Some more information on this extraordinary CD

Quote
The music of Guillaume de Machaut and Philippe de Vitry was radically new over 650 years ago; Vitry himself coined the term “ars nova” for it.
Now Helge Slaatto (violin) and Frank Reinecke (double bass) show how closely the power of this music was connected to the common intonation system of the time, based on pure perfect fifths, which lead to highly tense thirds.

Wolfgang Schweinitz examined this system for a long time and became one of the pioneers of just intonation. “Study No. I op. 61a” can be considered the quintessential result of this work. Using the tiniest microtonal distinctions, for which he even developed his own notation system, he creates a music consisting purely of intervals derived from the harmonic series.

The Slaatto-Reinecke duo, who have been specialists in just intonation for many years, draw a fascinating line from the Ars Nova of the 14th century to the New Music of our time.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Instrumental music from the 16th century and before
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2019, 09:15:29 PM »
They are interesting for a little while, but no match for the original a cappella vocal versions done well.

Oh
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Instrumental music from the 16th century and before
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2019, 08:57:27 PM »


Very lovely music making here, the best I can remember from Corina Marti - Marie Nishiyama is always worth hearing if you like the Japanese early music new wave.

Some information about what they’re playing here

https://www.prostudiomasters.com/album/page/14850
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 08:59:25 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Instrumental music from the 16th century and before
« Reply #23 on: September 01, 2019, 01:00:27 AM »
   

Beautifully recorded and seductively played!

Maurice Guis was part of an ensemble called Les Musiciens de Provence, and I'm exploring their recordings too, not without pleasure though it's not really my sort of thing.

« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 01:05:21 AM by Mandryka »
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