Author Topic: Schumann's Kreisleriana  (Read 16356 times)

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Offline Jo498

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2016, 06:17:27 AM »
Mendelssohn was even more well-rounded, he was a pretty good painter as well. So you are right, "by far" is an exaggeration (I had the somewhat rough, at best petit-bourgeois, backgrounds of Beethoven, Schubert and Brahms in mind when I wrote this). But to my knowledge Schumann was considerably more active and more prominent in writing and journalism on music than Mendelssohn. So both in this respect and also because his music is so infused with references to his favorite authors, I think Schumann deserves to be singled out.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2016, 06:34:14 AM »
Mendelssohn was even more well-rounded, he was a pretty good painter as well. So you are right, "by far" is an exaggeration (I had the somewhat rough, at best petit-bourgeois, backgrounds of Beethoven, Schubert and Brahms in mind when I wrote this). But to my knowledge Schumann was considerably more active and more prominent in writing and journalism on music than Mendelssohn. So both in this respect and also because his music is so infused with references to his favorite authors, I think Schumann deserves to be singled out.

Absolutely. Mendelssohn had the good fortune of being born into the highest, weallthiest ranks of the Jewish bourgeoisie --- which has historically been the class most appreciative of, and involved in, educating the offsprings in all things arts, letters, humanities and sciences. Whith such a background it would have been a huge surprise had he not had the best education available. He is probably the best educated famous composer ever, period.

Schumann was also fortunate in so far as his father was a librarian, so even if his formal education, although quite good, was not at the same level with Felix´s, he supplemented it by his own extensive readings. And you are right, he was much more a man of letters in his own right than Mendelssohn.

So yes, I agree with your main idea.
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Offline Pat B

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2016, 09:55:05 AM »
Thanks. (I know and love Fischer.) I think this is the Horowitz recording I've heard before, and then as now it's not quite "it" for me, but I did enjoy his use of touch more than I remember—better finger control than almost anyone. I also love how he more or less completely ignores the indicated rhythms in the left hand of No. 8—die Bässe durchaus leicht und frei, indeed. (I'll consider whether I like it enough to add—am fairly picky with my Kreislerianas, only have 11 or so right now, but it's not like any of them is perfect, anyway.)

If you're considering picking up the Horowitz, this might interest you:

http://hankdrake.blogspot.com/2010/04/kreisleriana-oops.html

Online Mandryka

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2016, 11:03:39 AM »
There are so many satisfying recordings out there and some of them full of character. Recently there's been Lonquich of course, but I know that amw already knows it. Another great recent release was a live from Horowitz at Carnegie hall in November 1968.  Virssaladze (there are several recordings, mostly unreleased)And before that there's Schliessmann, who has new things to say too.

There are a whole bunch of older performances which I really liked. Things like the first Cortot, from 1938; Vlado Perlemuter; Sofronitsky in 1952; the live Pollini from Salzburg; Bunin; Josef Hofmann live; the mono Kempff; the live recording by Natan Brand; the live recording by Shura Cherkassky on a DVD; Afanassiev.

One outstanding one which was never released is Pletnev in 2006, if anyone wants it they can PM me. Same for some unreleased ones from Virssaladze.

Anyway I can't do more than list these things. These are all performances which have left a reasonably positive impression, in the sense that either they had ideas which made me think about the music or they seemed particularly inspired, or they were just terribly original.

There are some I need to revisit to comment on with any confidence: Moiseiwitsch, Sololov, Gieseking, Lupu, Schuch, Arrau, Vorraber, Ryumina. I just don't remember enough.

« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 11:41:13 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline amw

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #24 on: February 17, 2016, 03:14:37 PM »

Sehr langsam Bb:
Are we sure about this? ;) The second Sehr langsam is definitely in Bb (not Eb) although it also ends on an inconclusive chord, in this case a tonic 6/4

Anyway if we're doing that I guess I can talk a little bit about my own learning of the piece. (I have absolutely no technique, and am probably a much worse pianist than even the GMG amateurs, so why I want to learn things like this—and am not taking piano lessons—is a question for the ages.)

No. 1 Äußerst bewegt - that rotation movement does really help! A continuing challenge is maintaing absolute evenness and tonal control in the middle section, where the dynamic marking is pp (1838 version). One other thing I had to work on for a while was accurately hitting the high d''' on its four appearances, since the only fingering that makes musical sense (for a' - d'' - d''') is 1-2-5 and whilst my hands are huge, they're not that huge. But I think it's in my muscle memory now. As far as pedal goes this is one of those movements where long pedals work really well—you almost don't need to change it at all for the first four bars, and the middle section can be played entirely with the pedal depressed (half-pedaling to clear harmonies) if it's quiet enough. But as shown by Horowitz, Grimaud and Kuerti you can also play the movement almost entirely without pedal. I flip-flop a lot on that issue.
No. 2 Sehr innig - it helped to play it absolutely without pedal until the octaves were more secure. Still have problems with the left-hand leaps, which range from a tenth to two octaves. (Tbh being able to accurately and consistently stretch a 10th would have been really helpful in this piece—I can do some 10ths, but I need preparation time.) The staccato touch required in Intermezzo I was hard on my wrists at first. My only real departure from the 1838 version is in taking the repeat in Intermezzo I—I think that's the only one he was right to add, but maybe it's wrong of me to pick and choose that way.
No. 3 Sehr aufgeregt - Precision! Those little four-note figures aren't just random smears, but my right hand still thinks so, sometimes. And I need stronger 3-4-5 in the left hand for the coda (where the two hands play those figures in contrary motion, faster). Tempo for the middle section is problematic; I think I play it too fast, but any slower feels wrong somehow.
No. 4 Sehr langsam - My instinct tells me that the opening chords should be extremely quiet, barely allowed to speak (& the same for many other passages in the movement). Playing quietly is challenging even for some professional pianists, and I tend to err on the side of striking the keys too slowly, so that there's no sound at all. But even with soft pedal, anything else seems too loud. We'll see what happens with this as I work on it >_> Also, I'm still not sure what is actually meant (in performance terms) by the 1838 ending. I'm supposed to re-strike the D on the final bar, I think, but maybe he meant for that to be tied over from the previous bar, like one of those pedal effects in e.g. the Abegg Variations or Papillons
No. 5 Sehr lebhaft - Actually this was the easiest one for me by a ways, and the first one I learned. The twisty left hand in the middle section sometimes gets confused, but that may be just because I'm playing too fast. I depart from the score here by using the soft pedal for the final return of the main theme
No. 6 Sehr langsam - Challenges are pretty much all interpretive here. In particular making the frequently recurring main theme sound different every time it comes back, the sense of a vast empty space at the B major chord, how much faster the Etwas bewegter section should go, how much slower the final Adagio should be, etc (especially considering that the piece is already very slow at quaver = 84). Less pedal than Schumann marked is effective here, probably.
No. 7 Sehr rasch - Evenness and LH strength—the fugato in the mid section is the only real left hand workout in the piece, and I still can't do it, but then I don't ever practice. Quite frankly this is the movement that most reminds me that I am shit at playing the piano, since it's technically one of the easiest if you have actually had piano lessons and thus have evenness and a strong left hand, which I imagine most student pianists have by, like, Grade 5 or whatever.
No. 8 Schnell und spielend - Playing the rhythm as written. (Again, professional pianists often don't—I'm not sure why. I recently auditioned Imogen Cooper's which completely crushes the middle note of each figure into the final one, after the rest of her recording took a standard high-precision approach.) In the B section, ensuring that the right hand accents the final quaver of each figure rather than the semiquaver before it (as one is tempted to do by the left hand which is essentially moving in dotted quavers)—the polymetry is meant to be the goal, I think, only the left hand is supposed to sound like it's in 2/4. In the C section, it's rarely practical to change fingers on the repeated notes, and using the same one is still quite hard on my wrists. Especially considering the dynamics (f mit aller kraft) and the tempo (instinct, again, tells me an accurate tempo is in the 2:40-3:00 range for the movement, close to e.g. Anda, Gieseking or Cortot, and that this shouldn't be relaxed). FWIW I generally play the A sections with soft pedal, though it's not marked.

Offline amw

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2016, 03:36:55 PM »
Anyway I can't do more than list these things. These are all performances which have left a reasonably positive impression, in the sense that either they had ideas which made me think about the music or they seemed particularly inspired, or they were just terribly original.
*nods* I think my own list is approaching Kreisleriana saturation—I can just about call all of these performances to mind (though I don't remember anything about Le Sage, whom I mostly have for the box anyway—like I don't have that box for the Kreisleriana or Fantasy, I have it for things like the Album für die Jugend or the Seven Fughettas or the Four Marches or the Albumblätter or whatever that nobody else plays) but very many more and I'd likely start to lose track. Generally the same applies: every performance made enough of a positive impression vs the competition. So I'm not going to choose a favourite.

Anda (DG)
Argerich
Ashkenazy
Egorov
Endres
Fischer
Grimaud
Kuerti
Le Sage
Lonquich
Perahia
Schuch

I had Schiff and Kempff (DG) at one point, but don't currently. I've been looking for Virsaladze (LCL 311), unsuccessfully so far, but also don't know whether it's worth it. (I'd also be very curious to hear a recording by Charles Rosen if such exists.) Apart from that, haven't decided whether there are other essential performances. Pretty much all the classic/golden age recordings are absent from streaming services and most of them are quite difficult to pirate, so how am I supposed to know if I like them enough to spend money on some guy who's been dead for 50+ years? :P
« Last Edit: February 17, 2016, 03:39:38 PM by amw »

Offline Brian

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2016, 02:29:30 PM »
Are we sure about this? ;) The second Sehr langsam is definitely in Bb (not Eb) although it also ends on an inconclusive chord, in this case a tonic 6/4

Anyway if we're doing that I guess I can talk a little bit about my own learning of the piece. (I have absolutely no technique, and am probably a much worse pianist than even the GMG amateurs, so why I want to learn things like this—and am not taking piano lessons—is a question for the ages.)

No. 1 Äußerst bewegt - that rotation movement does really help! A continuing challenge is maintaing absolute evenness and tonal control in the middle section, where the dynamic marking is pp (1838 version). One other thing I had to work on for a while was accurately hitting the high d''' on its four appearances, since the only fingering that makes musical sense (for a' - d'' - d''') is 1-2-5 and whilst my hands are huge, they're not that huge. But I think it's in my muscle memory now. As far as pedal goes this is one of those movements where long pedals work really well—you almost don't need to change it at all for the first four bars, and the middle section can be played entirely with the pedal depressed (half-pedaling to clear harmonies) if it's quiet enough. But as shown by Horowitz, Grimaud and Kuerti you can also play the movement almost entirely without pedal. I flip-flop a lot on that issue.
No. 2 Sehr innig - it helped to play it absolutely without pedal until the octaves were more secure. Still have problems with the left-hand leaps, which range from a tenth to two octaves. (Tbh being able to accurately and consistently stretch a 10th would have been really helpful in this piece—I can do some 10ths, but I need preparation time.) The staccato touch required in Intermezzo I was hard on my wrists at first. My only real departure from the 1838 version is in taking the repeat in Intermezzo I—I think that's the only one he was right to add, but maybe it's wrong of me to pick and choose that way.
No. 3 Sehr aufgeregt - Precision! Those little four-note figures aren't just random smears, but my right hand still thinks so, sometimes. And I need stronger 3-4-5 in the left hand for the coda (where the two hands play those figures in contrary motion, faster). Tempo for the middle section is problematic; I think I play it too fast, but any slower feels wrong somehow.
No. 4 Sehr langsam - My instinct tells me that the opening chords should be extremely quiet, barely allowed to speak (& the same for many other passages in the movement). Playing quietly is challenging even for some professional pianists, and I tend to err on the side of striking the keys too slowly, so that there's no sound at all. But even with soft pedal, anything else seems too loud. We'll see what happens with this as I work on it >_> Also, I'm still not sure what is actually meant (in performance terms) by the 1838 ending. I'm supposed to re-strike the D on the final bar, I think, but maybe he meant for that to be tied over from the previous bar, like one of those pedal effects in e.g. the Abegg Variations or Papillons
No. 5 Sehr lebhaft - Actually this was the easiest one for me by a ways, and the first one I learned. The twisty left hand in the middle section sometimes gets confused, but that may be just because I'm playing too fast. I depart from the score here by using the soft pedal for the final return of the main theme
No. 6 Sehr langsam - Challenges are pretty much all interpretive here. In particular making the frequently recurring main theme sound different every time it comes back, the sense of a vast empty space at the B major chord, how much faster the Etwas bewegter section should go, how much slower the final Adagio should be, etc (especially considering that the piece is already very slow at quaver = 84). Less pedal than Schumann marked is effective here, probably.
No. 7 Sehr rasch - Evenness and LH strength—the fugato in the mid section is the only real left hand workout in the piece, and I still can't do it, but then I don't ever practice. Quite frankly this is the movement that most reminds me that I am shit at playing the piano, since it's technically one of the easiest if you have actually had piano lessons and thus have evenness and a strong left hand, which I imagine most student pianists have by, like, Grade 5 or whatever.
No. 8 Schnell und spielend - Playing the rhythm as written. (Again, professional pianists often don't—I'm not sure why. I recently auditioned Imogen Cooper's which completely crushes the middle note of each figure into the final one, after the rest of her recording took a standard high-precision approach.) In the B section, ensuring that the right hand accents the final quaver of each figure rather than the semiquaver before it (as one is tempted to do by the left hand which is essentially moving in dotted quavers)—the polymetry is meant to be the goal, I think, only the left hand is supposed to sound like it's in 2/4. In the C section, it's rarely practical to change fingers on the repeated notes, and using the same one is still quite hard on my wrists. Especially considering the dynamics (f mit aller kraft) and the tempo (instinct, again, tells me an accurate tempo is in the 2:40-3:00 range for the movement, close to e.g. Anda, Gieseking or Cortot, and that this shouldn't be relaxed). FWIW I generally play the A sections with soft pedal, though it's not marked.

Just chiming in here to confess that I often look at people's avatars, rather than usernames, as a sort of visual shorthand for who is doing the posting. So I read this and thought, "Man, this new GMGer is really awesome, I hope they stick around...oh wait of course it's amw." Nothing substantive to contribute here. Just keep doin' your thing.

Wait! Maybe something substantive: Kreisleriana is one of the pieces that really taught me my own taste in piano performance. It showed me that I really like strong, sometimes even exaggerated, contrasts as a performing trait. Like the very first section - if the dynamic (EDIT: NOT rhythmic/tempo) contrast between the louder outer passages and the softer middle is almost cartoonishly great, then the interpretation is probably going to make me happy. No idea whether this has a strong or convincing root in the actual music, even if this is one of Schumann's "bipolar" works, but it taught me something about my own ears/taste.

bwv 1080

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2016, 08:26:13 PM »
(I'd also be very curious to hear a recording by Charles Rosen if such exists.)

He definitely made one - there is a three disc recording of Schumann made in the mid 80s on Nonesuch, but appears to be out of print.

A NYT review
http://www.nytimes.com/1984/09/30/arts/three-views-of-schumann.html

And Charles discussing the recording on a radio show with excerpts http://youtu.be/rU3z_O8HG_E

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2016, 08:30:41 PM »
No. 1 Äußerst bewegt - since the only fingering that makes musical sense (for a' - d'' - d''') is 1-2-5

No. 2 Sehr innig - Still have problems with the left-hand leaps, which range from a tenth to two octaves. (Tbh being able to accurately and consistently stretch a 10th would have been really helpful in this piece—I can do some 10ths, but I need preparation time.)

No. 4 Sehr langsam -  Also, I'm still not sure what is actually meant (in performance terms) by the 1838 ending. I'm supposed to re-strike the D on the final bar, I think, but maybe he meant for that to be tied over from the previous bar, like one of those pedal effects in e.g. the Abegg Variations or Papillons

No. 8 Schnell und spielend - Playing the rhythm as written. (Again, professional pianists often don't—I'm not sure why. I recently auditioned Imogen Cooper's which completely crushes the middle note of each figure into the final one, after the rest of her recording took a standard high-precision approach.)

1. For the A-A-D-D, try 1-5 1-5. Clara Schumann in her edition explicitly calls for 1 on the lower D, and it's both very secure and gets the phrasing just right. One of the real difficulties in the A section is avoiding accents in the left hand except where explicitly marked.

2. I think pedaling with arpeggiation should be satisfactory here.

4. Since the D in the right hand is the only note not tied, I have to conclude it should be struck again, very softly, in the last measure.

7. I think this one is a lot harder than you seem to.

8. This kind of rhythm is very hard to get with precision as the tendency is often to shift to 2/4. You see similar issues in recordings of the first movement of the Beethoven 7th and the scherzo of the Bruckner 7th, the latter of which I've never heard played as written. Possibly one way to practice would be at first to omit the middle note, playing quarter-eighth until the general rhythm is secure. But perhaps the only way to hear what the composers actually wrote would be to input the music into Finale or Sibelius and generate a WAV or MP3 file, and maybe I'll do a short sample sometime. In the Schumann it's complicated by the right hand having to play two independent voices, against the left hand marking different rhythms. The Mit aller Kraft section tends to be much easier to get right. I have that Cooper, on a BBC Music Magazine CD, and will have to give it a spin - though as a rule I don't have the patience to do a lot of comparative listening; I just grab a version and go.
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Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2016, 08:39:23 PM »
He definitely made one - there is a three disc recording of Schumann made in the mid 80s on Nonesuch, but appears to be out of print.

A NYT review
http://www.nytimes.com/1984/09/30/arts/three-views-of-schumann.html

And Charles discussing the recording on a radio show with excerpts http://youtu.be/rU3z_O8HG_E

The Rosen is not included in the recent 21-CD of Rosen's recordings for Epic and Columbia.
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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2016, 09:04:02 PM »
Rosen makes a point of the superiority of the first editions of Kreisleriana and his other piano masterworks - that repeats were added and a few harmonies normalized in the second editions which were made during Schumann's declining later years - Rosen and the NYT review in the mid 80s make it seem like performances of the first editions are rare - is this still true?

Online Mandryka

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2016, 11:09:12 PM »
Rosen makes a point of the superiority of the first editions of Kreisleriana and his other piano masterworks - that repeats were added and a few harmonies normalized in the second editions which were made during Schumann's declining later years - Rosen and the NYT review in the mid 80s make it seem like performances of the first editions are rare - is this still true?

Well that's what Lonquich does, I think he's the only one.
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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2016, 11:29:36 PM »
Some interesting if nerdy comments in this thread. I´ll revisit some of those I have, which are:

- Beroff/emi cd
- Fellner/warner cd
- Grimaud/brilliant cd
- Arrau/artone cd 1946
- Arrau/ph lp stereo
- Anda/angel mono lp
- Anda/dg stereo lp
- Horowitz/CBS stereo lp 1969   
- Horowitz/dg lp 1986
- Rubinstein/rca stereo lp (rather subdued, according to a note of mine)     
- Egorov/peters int 1978 lp
- Argerich /dg cd 1984

Skipped/sold Karolyi (Arkadia cd) and Perlemuter (dover mono LP).

 

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #33 on: February 19, 2016, 04:19:49 AM »
Some interesting if nerdy comments in this thread.

There is much to be said in favor of nerdiness. Actually the most radical "first edition" difference occurs in the C major Fantasy, where in the slow movement from the original edition, Schumann brought back the ending from the first movement to round off the entire work. Much more effective, IMO, than the bare string of arpeggios we normally hear at the end of the finale.
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Offline Brian

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #34 on: February 19, 2016, 06:01:00 AM »
The Rosen is not included in the recent 21-CD of Rosen's recordings for Epic and Columbia.
The article says the Schumann set was on Nonesuch, so we know who to blame.

Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #35 on: February 19, 2016, 06:16:21 AM »
The article says the Schumann set was on Nonesuch, so we know who to blame.

Rosen did a lot of recordings other than for Columbia. The Nonesuch LPs were issued on CD by a company called Globe. I have vol. 2, with Carnaval and the F# minor sonata, but none of the others.

ETA: Ha! delighted to say I just nabbed vol. 3 (Kreisleriana and the Fantasy) on eBay for a decent price.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2016, 06:24:49 AM by (poco) Sforzando »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #36 on: February 19, 2016, 10:27:14 AM »
There is much to be said in favor of nerdiness. Actually the most radical "first edition" difference occurs in the C major Fantasy, where in the slow movement from the original edition, Schumann brought back the ending from the first movement to round off the entire work. Much more effective, IMO, than the bare string of arpeggios we normally hear at the end of the finale.

Yes, Rosen plays the original ending of the Fantasy, you'll see when your LP arrives. It's good.

It would be good to know more about these revisions, what recordings there are of earlier incarnations.

I must say I have a soft spot for Rosen, I don't know why I should find nearly everything he recorded so fascinating, not least this Schumann.
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Offline (poco) Sforzando

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #37 on: February 19, 2016, 10:39:30 AM »
I must say I have a soft spot for Rosen, I don't know why I should find nearly everything he recorded so fascinating, not least this Schumann.

Me too, and his books even more. I took a graduate seminar with him on contemporary criticism of music, literature, and art, and he was quite a fascinating personality (though not invariably very simpatico).
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Offline amw

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #38 on: February 19, 2016, 03:23:43 PM »
Like the very first section - if the dynamic (EDIT: NOT rhythmic/tempo) contrast between the louder outer passages and the softer middle is almost cartoonishly great, then the interpretation is probably going to make me happy. No idea whether this has a strong or convincing root in the actual music,
Dynamics are f-ff in the A sections and pp (1838) or p (1850) in the B section. Recordings that follow the 1838 edition (or use its dynamic and agogic marks with the 1850 text, which used to be common due to an incorrect but popular edition) will probably have more contrast.

1. For the A-A-D-D, try 1-5 1-5. Clara Schumann in her edition explicitly calls for 1 on the lower D, and it's both very secure and gets the phrasing just right. One of the real difficulties in the A section is avoiding accents in the left hand except where explicitly marked.
I wasn't entirely sure what you meant by that, but checked the Henle edition (which follows Clara) which suggests 5-2 1-5 (for a''-a'-d''-d'''). That's an interesting fingering in that it necessitates a break after a'' and therefore sets it in relief. I'll work on it

Quote
8. This kind of rhythm is very hard to get with precision as the tendency is often to shift to 2/4. You see similar issues in recordings of the first movement of the Beethoven 7th and the scherzo of the Bruckner 7th, the latter of which I've never heard played as written. Possibly one way to practice would be at first to omit the middle note, playing quarter-eighth until the general rhythm is secure.
I often practice it as straight 8ths. That and doing the voices independently. There are some recordings that do get it with absolute precision—among my collection, Kuerti.

Quote
I have that Cooper, on a BBC Music Magazine CD
I don't know if that's the same or different to the one I heard, which was on Chandos (and as far as I can tell the first version of Kreisleriana available in 24/96, though I didn't like it enough to get the hi-res).

Well that's what Lonquich does, I think he's the only one.
Eugen Indjic as well. Lots of people also use 'hybrid versions' with eg the repeats from 1850 but the rest of the text from 1838, or the 1850 text with the 1838 dynamic markings, etc.

There is much to be said in favor of nerdiness.
I've always understood nerds as being science/math/technology enthusiasts with little interest in or knowledge of arts and culture. Obsessive, somewhat insular music fans are usually referred to as "critics". >_>

Quote
Actually the most radical "first edition" difference occurs in the C major Fantasy, where in the slow movement from the original edition, Schumann brought back the ending from the first movement to round off the entire work. Much more effective, IMO, than the bare string of arpeggios we normally hear at the end of the finale.
Yes.

Schiff offers the alternate ending of the Fantasy as a bonus track on one of his ECM Schumann CDs and I know I've heard at least one other recording that takes it.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Schumann's Kreisleriana
« Reply #39 on: February 20, 2016, 12:40:30 AM »




For those who have the Rosen recordings, he plays the first versions of Kreisleriana, the Fantasy and DBT.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2016, 12:46:34 AM by Mandryka »
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