Author Topic: Florestan´s Romantic Salon  (Read 15421 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #140 on: May 23, 2017, 09:41:52 AM »
Verdi wrote a very nice string quartet, so, no.

And while Berlioz wrote no absolute music, he was a master of, erm, "absolute forms."
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Online Jeffrey Smith

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #141 on: May 23, 2017, 09:47:01 AM »
Siegfried Idyll is not really programmatic.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #142 on: May 23, 2017, 09:57:23 AM »
Siegfried Idyll is not really programmatic.

I think there is an argument to be made there, even though the piece seems originally to have been titled Triebschen Idyll with Fidi's birdsong and the orange sunrise, as symphonic birthday greeting.  Good Lord, even this compact piece could suffer from his characteristic verbal incontinence  ;)
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Offline Scarpia

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #143 on: May 23, 2017, 09:58:43 AM »
And while Berlioz wrote no absolute music, he was a master of, erm, "absolute forms."

Rêverie et caprice for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 8?


Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #144 on: May 23, 2017, 10:02:39 AM »
Rêverie et caprice for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 8?

My statement was incorrectly absolute  :)  Andrei did point out that very work.  Is a Rêverie “absolute music”?  Feels borderline to me. Part of me wants simply to allow a caprice as “absolute music,” part of me leans towards calling the Op.8 a pair of contrasting character pieces.
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Online Jo498

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #145 on: May 23, 2017, 10:26:18 AM »
When I am in Devil’s Advocate mode, I rather wonder if Wagner’s dependence on extra-musical stuff was not an inherent compositional weakness.
As he wrote about the most symphonic (="absolute") operas, bleeding chunks of which work quite well as isolated "quasi tone poems" I think this was only an "external" dependence.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #146 on: May 23, 2017, 10:42:08 AM »
Is a Rêverie “absolute music”?  Feels borderline to me. Part of me wants simply to allow a caprice as “absolute music,” part of me leans towards calling the Op.8 a pair of contrasting character pieces.

Given we talk about Berlioz, I doubt there is no programmatic underpinning.

Et voilà: http://www.hberlioz.com/Scores/sreverie.htm
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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #147 on: May 23, 2017, 11:18:47 AM »
This would be a great addition to the Romantic Salon, am I right?   0:)

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Offline Florestan

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #148 on: May 23, 2017, 11:43:49 AM »
This would be a great addition to the Romantic Salon, am I right?   0:)

8)

AFAIC, you can take all necessary actions.  :)
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Offline millionrainbows

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #149 on: July 31, 2017, 09:04:25 AM »
Just listened to Samuel Barber's Symphony No. 1 and his Piano Concerto. I listen these days in terms of verticality vs. horizontal, and the vertical definitely won. Thus, I see him as very much a modernist, as well as his usual label as a Romantic. Some very exotic sonorities in the Piano Concerto.

Offline Cato

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #150 on: August 02, 2017, 06:12:02 PM »
Just listened to Samuel Barber's Symphony No. 1 and his Piano Concerto. I listen these days in terms of verticality vs. horizontal, and the vertical definitely won. Thus, I see him as very much a modernist, as well as his usual label as a Romantic. Some very exotic sonorities in the Piano Concerto.

The terms are not exclusive!

Rêverie et caprice for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 8?



Speaking of the term Reverie...

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Zl6fhv3pyao" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Zl6fhv3pyao</a>



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Offline millionrainbows

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #151 on: August 16, 2017, 01:29:40 PM »
The more I listen to Beethoven, the less I think he's a Romantic. He's a modernist.

Offline Est.1965

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Re: Florestan´s Romantic Salon
« Reply #152 on: September 07, 2017, 01:55:32 PM »
The more I listen to Beethoven, the less I think he's a Romantic. He's a modernist.
Yep.  How he would love the sororities and dynamic range of a big modern orchestra in a big custom built hall.  Oh lordy, what would he have written for THAT (with unimpaired hearing)?  He certainly was a modernist, by about 200 years!   :)
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