Author Topic: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)  (Read 7853 times)

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Offline J.Z. Herrenberg

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2008, 08:10:19 AM »
Ah, but no. That is precisely the piece I had in mind. Sorry, at the time of writing my earlier post I was too lazy to find the score or recording and check the title. But now I've managed to find the CD, and here's the track I mentioned earlier - in comparison to Vriemia, vpieriod, it sounds almost tasteful. ;D

Almost tasteful? It is tasteful! Nationalism Restrained.  ;)
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Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #21 on: December 10, 2008, 09:35:16 AM »
I was accused(perhaps not entirely unfairly) of making fun of Sviridov in earlier posts ;D

I have just listened to his Pathetic Oratorio of 1959(Oratorio pathetique sounds less offensive!). It is scored for mezzo-soprano, bass(in a narrative, declamatory role), chorus and orchestra and is really quite a rousing and exciting piece :) Splendidly committed performance-as one would expect-by the Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra under the late great Kiril Kondrashin from 1975 on an imported Russian cd.

Offline Dundonnell

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2008, 02:33:20 PM »
Just listened to another Sviridov choral work, the Poem in Mamory of Sergei Yesenin for tenor, choir and orchestra(1955). This is certainly the best Sviridov I have heard. It is on the Russian Vista Vera label in a performance conducted by Vladimire Fedoseyev from 1981. Rich, lyrical and quite touching music. I may be warming to Sviridov after all :)

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2009, 08:49:27 AM »
I have an old Olympia disc featuring my favorite Piano Trio...of all time! (cue Muhammad Ali impression) Sviridov's trio was written shortly after DSCH's, and contains ALL the things...I'm telling you I've searched in vain for a more perfect Shostyesque piece of chamber music. The slow movmt has all the same great stuff as Shosty, and the whole has that nostalgiac look back on things forever lost (Myaskovsky's Cello Cto.). I don't think you can fault him for having every note in place here...best Russian P.Tr. ever,...drink lots of vodka and cry.

Next on the cd was some songs or vocal music...which I still haven't listened to, well, maybe once, but I'm sure it doesn't exhibit the "beautiful" aspects of Sviridov (if it had the same melancoly as the P.Tr. I'm sure I would be raving now). I'll have to find it.

Last on the cd was I believe a Chamber Symphony which I believe was a more optimistic upbeat affair (why am I thinking Casella?). I think it had some modern touches, vigourous, rompy, and just attractive as music. Good old fashioned substantial mid-century modern Russian composer music.

But anyone seeking "the" Russian Piano Trio need look no further!!!

I remember being disappointed by Vainberg's Piano Qnt. because it did not meet up with my minor key/Shosty expectations (though Vainberg's Cello Cto. certainly is perfection). Perhaps Popov or Shebalin...?

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98) String Quartets?
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2014, 08:03:53 AM »
'Snow Storm' is an orchestral work? How is it, anyone?

Also, how about those String Quartets 1-2, written in the '40s, after the amazing Piano Trio?

Also, what would be THE Sviridov disc of Vocal Music?

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2014, 08:53:53 PM »
I have just one piece of music by this composer, St Petersburg. It is cloyingly beautiful. People who like relaxing, easy going romantic music will like it. Hvorotovsky sings.

« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 08:55:24 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98) String Quartets?
« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2014, 11:11:06 PM »
'Snow Storm' is an orchestral work? How is it, anyone?

Also, how about those String Quartets 1-2, written in the '40s, after the amazing Piano Trio?

Also, what would be THE Sviridov disc of Vocal Music?

The Snowstorm (1964) was written to accompany a film based on a story by Pushkin. It is tuneful, memorable and endearing music and very Russian sounding. It lasts 26 minutes and is in eight short movements. I find it atmospheric and enjoyable. In a way it is 'light' music but I do not find it either superficial or bland. Parts of Prokofiev's 'Romeo and Juliet' came to mind (Waltz) as did Piston's 'The Incredible Flautist'. The last movement 'Winter Road' is oddly moving. I think that this music would appeal to admirers of Lyadov's atmospheric miniatures, like 'The Enchanted Lake'.
I see that Fedoseyev's fine version is being reissued this month. They call it 'The Blizzard' here but it is the same work. I have it on an old Olympia CD but it is now on Melodiya.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2014, 12:07:00 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline Angelos_05

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98) String Quartets?
« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2016, 02:57:33 PM »
The Snowstorm (1964) was written to accompany a film based on a story by Pushkin. It is tuneful, memorable and endearing music and very Russian sounding. It lasts 26 minutes and is in eight short movements. I find it atmospheric and enjoyable. In a way it is 'light' music but I do not find it either superficial or bland. Parts of Prokofiev's 'Romeo and Juliet' came to mind (Waltz) as did Piston's 'The Incredible Flautist'. The last movement 'Winter Road' is oddly moving. I think that this music would appeal to admirers of Lyadov's atmospheric miniatures, like 'The Enchanted Lake'.
I see that Fedoseyev's fine version is being reissued this month. They call it 'The Blizzard' here but it is the same work. I have it on an old Olympia CD but it is now on Melodiya.

The last movement of the suite is in fact so moving that Tappy Iwase might have drawn inspiration from when he composed the main theme for Metal Gear Solid back in 1995. The game was revealed to the public in April 1996, however it did not received its release until Sep 1998.  The Japanese release by Canyon Classics is very conveniently placed in 1995, when Metal Gear Solid was in early development
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7damwzqa4s

I was an MGS fan, and this is how I came to know Georgy Sviridov. In a MGS fan site, somebody brought up the Winter Way from Sviridov's Suite back in 2005 and I in turn was awe-stricken by the similarity and resemblance.

Quote
A video posted on YouTube  shows series creator, Hideo Kojima, being presented with a recording of Georgy Sviridov's "Pushkin's Garland," a 1979 classical work which contains a similar-sounding passage. The MGS theme was first heard in the original PlayStation game, 1998. It was written by Konami's Tappi "TAPPY" Iwase, and has subsequently been reworked and remixed, most notably by film composer Harry Gregson-Williams, who scored MGS2-4.

Speaking to EGM, Hibino flatly denies that the MGS theme was "stolen," but admits that "Konami was too sensitive about the situation and just decided not to use that music in Metal Gear Solid 4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tappi_Iwase

http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=21513



In any case, I would like to recommend the Japanese Canyon Classics release of 1995 (recorded on 18-20 May 1995). It's a fabulous 24-bit DDD recording.






http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_%E3%82%B9%E3%83%B4%E3%82%A3%E3%83%AA%E3%83%89%E3%83%95%EF%BC%881915-1998%EF%BC%89_000000000052903/item_%E3%82%B9%E3%83%B4%E3%82%A3%E3%83%AA%E3%83%89%E3%83%95%EF%BC%9A%E3%80%8E%E5%90%B9%E9%9B%AA%E3%80%8F%E3%80%81%E3%82%B0%E3%83%AA%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AB%EF%BC%9A%E7%AE%A1%E5%BC%A6%E6%A5%BD%E6%9B%B2%E9%9B%86%E3%80%80%E3%83%95%E3%82%A7%E3%83%89%E3%82%BB%E3%83%BC%E3%82%A8%E3%83%95%EF%BC%86%E3%83%A2%E3%82%B9%E3%82%AF%E3%83%AF%E6%94%BE%E9%80%81%E4%BA%A4%E9%9F%BF%E6%A5%BD%E5%9B%A3%EF%BC%88HQCD%EF%BC%89_2761622
http://hp.ponycanyon.co.jp/short/sakuhin/PCCL000000582/?REF=MUSIC
http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/shiragabach/50106138.html



-=========================================================================================

There is Toccata Classics' Sviridov into the bargain



https://toccataclassics.com/product/georgy-sviridov-hymns-prayers/

« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 03:05:03 PM by Angelos_05 »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2017, 08:12:20 AM »
I had bought this CD ages ago and it was still in the wrapper. Opened it up and played it today. It is an excellent CD featuring many of the works from this discussion thread:


I've enjoyed every work, especially the jazzy opening movement of 'Small Triptych' and reflective second movement. He has a style unlike other soviet composers I think but very approachable without being facile.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 08:15:50 AM by vandermolen »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2017, 12:25:13 PM »
Not only have I been enjoying the CD shown immediately above of Sviridov's choral and orchestral works but also a brand new CD of chamber works. Shostakovich was the mentor and friend of Sviridov and I'm sure that if you like (as I do) Shostakovich's Piano Quintet and Piano Trio these powerful and moving chamber works (from 1945) by Sviridov, which clearly relate to the soviet experience in World War Two, will appeal to you as well, especially when as beautifully played and recorded here:

Here is the musicweb review:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/Oct/Sviridov_chamber_8553375.htm

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2017, 05:26:24 PM »
I also like the quintet on this CD (more than the trio).

My all time favorite Sviridov is this lieder CD on poems of Alexander Blok.  I posted it over and over in other threads.



I also enjoyed this recent take on Russia Adrift, another song cycle for mezzo and chamber orchestra



« Last Edit: October 07, 2017, 05:28:30 PM by Spineur »

Offline kyjo

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2017, 05:56:10 PM »
Not only have I been enjoying the CD shown immediately above of Sviridov's choral and orchestral works but also a brand new CD of chamber works. Shostakovich was the mentor and friend of Sviridov and I'm sure that if you like (as I do) Shostakovich's Piano Quintet and Piano Trio these powerful and moving chamber works (from 1945) by Sviridov, which clearly relate to the soviet experience in World War Two, will appeal to you as well, especially when as beautifully played and recorded here:

Here is the musicweb review:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/Oct/Sviridov_chamber_8553375.htm



Thanks for bringing this to my attention, Jeffrey. I love Shostakovich's Piano Quintet and Piano Trio (I assume you mean no. 2), so I'll definitely be checking out those Sviridov works!
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2017, 11:28:49 PM »
Thanks for bringing this to my attention, Jeffrey. I love Shostakovich's Piano Quintet and Piano Trio (I assume you mean no. 2), so I'll definitely be checking out those Sviridov works!
Thanks Kyle and Spineur. Yes I did mean Shostakovich's Piano Trio No.2
It occurred to me that some of Sviridov's orchestral music reminds me of music by Ovchinnikov, anther fine and even more neglected composer, who is still alive as far as I know.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2017, 11:32:45 PM by vandermolen »
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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98) PIANO TRIO MASTERPIECE PQ????
« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2017, 08:57:41 AM »
Piano Trio (1945)H



it's a flipping Masterpiece!!!!! The saddest thing ever... must find the old Olympia CD... is the PIANO QUINTET just as good???

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98) PIANO TRIO MASTERPIECE PQ????
« Reply #34 on: October 08, 2017, 09:26:06 AM »
Piano Trio (1945)H



it's a flipping Masterpiece!!!!! The saddest thing ever... must find the old Olympia CD... is the PIANO QUINTET just as good???

I think so although the Funeral March in the Piano Trio is probably my favourite movement in both works, although slightly derivative of Shostakovich's Piano Quintet.
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Offline relm1

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2018, 05:19:10 PM »
I am listening to "The Snow Storm" conducted by Vladimir Fedoseyev now and it is such charming and lovely Russian music.  Very Russian with elements of Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich.  Based on a story by Tolstoy, does it get any more Russian than that?  I want to hear more from this excellent composer but there just isn't much out there but it is of such high quality.  Why isn't he better known? 
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 05:23:54 PM by relm1 »

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #36 on: November 14, 2018, 06:26:41 PM »
I am listening to "The Snow Storm" conducted by Vladimir Fedoseyev now and it is such charming and lovely Russian music.  Very Russian with elements of Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich.  Based on a story by Tolstoy, does it get any more Russian than that?  I want to hear more from this excellent composer but there just isn't much out there but it is of such high quality.  Why isn't he better known?

Yes, The Snow Storm is such a delectable work, it's a real delight to listen to it. Maybe you should try his chamber music, i.e. the Piano Trio and the Piano Quintet, which have some echoes of Shostakovich.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Georgi Sviridov(1915-98)
« Reply #37 on: November 14, 2018, 10:43:00 PM »
I am listening to "The Snow Storm" conducted by Vladimir Fedoseyev now and it is such charming and lovely Russian music.  Very Russian with elements of Mussorgsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovich.  Based on a story by Tolstoy, does it get any more Russian than that?  I want to hear more from this excellent composer but there just isn't much out there but it is of such high quality.  Why isn't he better known?
+1
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