Author Topic: The Sherlock Holmes thread  (Read 814 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2018, 05:08:11 AM »
Recently finished The Sign of the Four.

What did you think of it?
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Alberich

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2018, 06:13:54 AM »
What did you think of it?

When it comes to the full-length Holmes novels I liked it better than Baskerville and The Valley of Fear, especially because in here there are no long gaps with Holmes out of the picture (usually I like the villains more than the heroes but Holmes is one of exceptions to the rule, because he is such an interesting personality, full of character flaws yet also having intellectual brilliance and wit which reminds me why I love House M.D. so much). Also Watson's marriage proposal was an important event. I liked the villain, surprisingly (relatively) pleasant for Doyle villain and the chase scene was full of tension. Although the ending was a bit abrupt, even though the bad guy was caught and had told his tale, the treasure was unrecovered (although its recovery would have put an end to Watson's marriage proposal to Mary Morstan) and it thus felt a bit of an anti-climax. But now, looking back at it, I think it worked rather better that way.

I also read the Adventure of the Speckled Band, which was a fun murder mystery. I can see why this was Doyle's favourite of his Holmes stories (although I still have read only few of them).
"Javert, though frightful, had nothing ignoble about him. Probity, sincerity, candor, conviction, the sense of duty, are things which may become hideous when wrongly directed; but which, even when hideous, remain grand."

- Victor Hugo

Offline zamyrabyrd

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2018, 07:23:06 AM »
About a month ago I reread the 1122 page Penguin Complete Sherlock Holmes. I hate when paperbacks get yellowed pages. Sometime I should replace this copy with a more elegantly bound one but it did supply many hours of enjoyment and fascination.

One of the things that struck me this time around was Conan Doyle's very good grasp of the American landscape, its speech patterns but also a deep knowledge of the history of the West and Mormonism.

I particularly liked the TV series in the 1980's with Jeremy Brett as Holmes.
https://www.arthur-conan-doyle.com/index.php/Sherlock_Holmes_(TV_series_1984-1994)



« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 07:27:51 AM by zamyrabyrd »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2018, 09:56:04 PM »
When it comes to the full-length Holmes novels I liked it better than Baskerville and The Valley of Fear, especially because in here there are no long gaps with Holmes out of the picture (usually I like the villains more than the heroes but Holmes is one of exceptions to the rule, because he is such an interesting personality, full of character flaws yet also having intellectual brilliance and wit which reminds me why I love House M.D. so much). Also Watson's marriage proposal was an important event. I liked the villain, surprisingly (relatively) pleasant for Doyle villain and the chase scene was full of tension. Although the ending was a bit abrupt, even though the bad guy was caught and had told his tale, the treasure was unrecovered (although its recovery would have put an end to Watson's marriage proposal to Mary Morstan) and it thus felt a bit of an anti-climax. But now, looking back at it, I think it worked rather better that way.

I also read the Adventure of the Speckled Band, which was a fun murder mystery. I can see why this was Doyle's favourite of his Holmes stories (although I still have read only few of them).
Interesting - thanks. I don't know this story and am only familiar with the Hound and the Valley of Fear. I do like the Valley of Fear even though Holmes is absent for a long time. The chief villain is really villainous and the English part is set very near to where I live so I'm familiar with the locations, especially Groombridge Place which was the setting of the early part of the book (I think it's called 'Birlstone' in the novel). The Pinkerton's agent is an interesting character as well.

http://www.ihearofsherlock.com/2018/01/the-real-house-that-inspired-birlstone.html#.W0xCNnB4WrU
« Last Edit: July 15, 2018, 09:59:34 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Alberich

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2018, 01:03:09 AM »
Interesting - thanks. I don't know this story and am only familiar with the Hound and the Valley of Fear. I do like the Valley of Fear even though Holmes is absent for a long time. The chief villain is really villainous and the English part is set very near to where I live so I'm familiar with the locations, especially Groombridge Place which was the setting of the early part of the book (I think it's called 'Birlstone' in the novel). The Pinkerton's agent is an interesting character as well.

http://www.ihearofsherlock.com/2018/01/the-real-house-that-inspired-birlstone.html#.W0xCNnB4WrU

Yes, I liked Valley of Fear too. Boss McGinty is really a terrifying character.
"Javert, though frightful, had nothing ignoble about him. Probity, sincerity, candor, conviction, the sense of duty, are things which may become hideous when wrongly directed; but which, even when hideous, remain grand."

- Victor Hugo

Offline vandermolen

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2018, 01:44:45 AM »
Yes, I liked Valley of Fear too. Boss McGinty is really a terrifying character.

Oh yes, that's the man!!

The surprising end of the novel is good too.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Alberich

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Re: The Sherlock Holmes thread
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2018, 01:57:35 AM »
Apparently, after The Final Problem, Valley of the Fear is the only other Sherlock Holmes story in which Professor Moriarty plays role in the events even though he doesn't appear in person. I guess it makes sense that in TV series and movies they tend to make him a recurring archnemesis to Holmes even though he was originally basically just a device to kill Holmes off (although Doyle later changed his mind and revealed that Holmes survived the Reichenbach Falls fight).
"Javert, though frightful, had nothing ignoble about him. Probity, sincerity, candor, conviction, the sense of duty, are things which may become hideous when wrongly directed; but which, even when hideous, remain grand."

- Victor Hugo