Author Topic: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]  (Read 2975 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« on: August 27, 2016, 05:37:22 AM »
Sadly, I cannot recommend the Fritz Brun symphonies (on Guild) I have heard so far-Nos. 3, 5, 9 and 10.

Despite the passionate advocacy of the eccentric musicologist and conductor Adriano the symphonies are turning out to be rather turgid affairs-Brucknerian but without a tithe of the inspiration.

Won't stop me collecting them all, no doubt-just as I collected all the pleasant but pretty feeble Hans Huber symphonies ;D

Sometimes History does get it right :)

I remembered your post as I was listening to Brun's SQ No.3 in F Major (1942). Even the notes mention the eh of Brun's symphs, that apparently he wasn't quite the orchestrator either, along with being imitative to a yawning degree.

The SQ, however, is really something, I think. At first one may be reminded of something French, such as Roger-Ducasse's sprawling ode to Faure, his SQ No.2 (1953), and, indeed, this is one of the most picturesque musics I've heard. you really really get a sense of the hills and dales of Lucerne and Tinico (where Brun settled right before writing this). I may also be hearing some Stenhammer, or some such thing.

Written in 1942, this music is totally removed. All we have here is pure joy and sunshine and mountain air! I prefer it a bit to the Schoeck SQ on the same cd, but, honestly, the two pieces make such a perfect match that I'm sure I will end up always listening to both.

Brun discography is split between the symphs and this cd. I encourage anyone who may be reticent to try the Schoeck/Brun SQs on this musiques-suisse.ch cd. And be happy!

SIGN HERE X   I, Scion7, do hereby agree to all risks in resurrecting an old syprrr post, and release the GMG CMF owner of all responsibilites thereof.


from The New Grove:

(b Lucerne, 18 Aug 1878; d Gross Höchstetten, canton of Berne, 29 Nov 1959). Swiss composer, conductor and pianist. After lessons with Willem Mengelberg in Lucerne, he studied at the Cologne Conservatory (1897–1901), where his teachers included Franz Wüllner (composition) and Max van de Sandt (piano). Upon the completion of his studies, he became music tutor to Prince George of Prussia (1901) and met Busoni and Nikisch in Berlin. Short stays in London and Dortmund ... (1903) ... During this period he performed regularly as a soloist in orchestral and chamber concerts promoted by the Berne Music Society. In 1909 he succeeded Karl Munzinger as principal conductor of the Berne SO, the Cecilian Choral Society and the Berne Liedertafel. Despite a busy conducting schedule (until his retirement in 1941), he also remained active as a composer.
Brun’s early works coincided with an upsurge in nationalist schools of composition. While the Austro-German Romantic antecedents of his Second Symphony (1911) are clear, especially in its yearning slow movement, features of the symphonies nos.3–5 are more closely associated with the Swiss Alps; the Third (1919), for example, includes a set of variations on the Ticinese folksong Noi siamo in tre re. His string quartets also express the atmosphere of his homeland. He characterized the finale of the First Quartet (1898) as suggesting ‘mountain air, the smell of hay’. The Fourth Symphony (1925), however, suggests the influence of Stravinsky, as well as Brahms and Bruckner. The Fifth (1929), which is lighter in texture, grapples with the disintegration of the tonal system; after an elegy for Hermann Suter, the work concludes with a jagged fugue. Showing greater freedom of expression, the Seventh (1937) begins with a noble meditation on themes from Schoeck’s opera Venus and culminates in a hymnic finale. More programmatic in nature, the movements of the Eighth (1942) correspond to times of day and the Ninth (1950) was conceived as a kind of diary. With the Tenth (1953), Brun returned to the absolute music and formal procedures of his youth. Although his music fell out of favour in the latter half of the 20th century, he has continued to be considered a pre-eminent Swiss symphonist.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 05:24:05 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2016, 05:43:20 AM »
Chamber music
==========================

String Qt no.1, E, 1898
Sonata No.1, d, violin, piano, 1920
String Qt no.2, G, 1921
String Qt no.3, F, 1943
String Qt no.4, D, 1949
Sonata No.2, D, violin, piano, 1951
Cello Sonata, 1952

Orchestral
================================

Sym. no.1, b, 1901
Aus dem Buche Hiob, symphonic poem, 1906
Sym. no.2, B, 1911
Sym. no.3, d, 1919
Sym. no.4, E, 1925
Sym. no.5, E, 1929
Sym. no.6, C, 1933
Sym. no.7, D, 1937
Sym. no.8, A, 1942
Sym. Prologue, E, 1942
Variations on an Original Theme for Piano & Strings, 1944
Piano Concerto, 1946
Cello Concerto, 1947
Sym. no.9, F, 1950
Ov. ‘For a Jubilee’, 1950
Sym. no.10, B, 1953
Divertimento for piano & strings, 1954
Rhapsody, 1958
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2016, 05:54:10 AM »








The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2016, 05:57:06 AM »










« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 05:59:27 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2016, 06:03:56 AM »
A violin sonata is on here:







The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2016, 06:06:41 AM »


The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2016, 05:26:34 PM »
I guess my favorite is Symphony No.3 in d, (1919) on Sterling.

MusicWeb 13 years ago:

    ‘The Third Symphony reflects impressions of Alpine wanderings. There is a painting by Ferdinand Hodler of the Jungfrau as seen from Mürren. Autumn, bad weather – the Alps in their most unfriendly, hostile aspect. This picture inspired me – though secondarily. The first impression was the mountain itself, holding me in her tentacles’
Fritz Brun writing to the conducter Hermann Scherchen
     Once again Adriano reveals another little known work and leads us up a rocky mountain path to reveal Brun’s grandiose Symphony No. 3 in D minor. The path is rocky making demands on the listener and it is probably only after repeated hearings that Brun’s grand design will be fully appreciated. The first movement’s music is densely scored for a large orchestra; and there are brief stretches of atonality and dissonance that may seem daunting at a first hearing. It is not only the physical dimensions of the hostile high mountain environment that concern Brun but also the metaphysical - the struggle, akin to that in Franck’s Symphony, of escaping from darkness to light. The music is strongly influenced by Brahms, Bruckner and Sibelius. The very earnest opening movement that expresses all these evocations and sentiments does have lighter moments, though - expressive of the natural life on the lower Alpine pastures.
     The second movement is in the form of ‘Variations on an old Swiss-Italian Epiphany carol’ (‘We Are The Three Kings’) and again the shadow of Brahms looms large. The opening mood, as the theme and the first variation, Tranquillo, are stated, is solemn. The second variation is slightly lighter in hue and somewhat pastoral but then comes an extraordinary variation, Alla Marcia that is reminiscent of Korngold in Robin Hood mode before the music turns virile Brahmsian. The next variation, Presto, is reminiscent of the Walpurgis section of Berlioz’s Queen Mab. Variation V is more tender, a plaintive Bach-like aria with an overlay of Berlioz while the final variation, commencing affectingly with a duet for two cellos, may remind one of Marguerite’s music from La Damnation de Faust. These two last variations impress strongly.
     The material of the final movement bears strong relationships to that of the first movement. Here a benign Brahmsian influence in lyrical and folk mode is predominant. Brun is up in the Alpine slopes singing his praise of nature – the music showing a welcome light-heartedness (in places it is almost boisterous) after the heavy introspection of the opening movement. Only an occasional passing cloud mars the sunshine.

     Adriano makes an eloquent and passionate case for this rather solemn epic symphony. Adventurous, persevering listeners will discover riches.

Ian Lace

« Last Edit: August 27, 2016, 05:28:30 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

snyprrr

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2016, 04:46:30 PM »
You have great taste! :laugh:




I'll have to dig that up, not least of all for the Schoeck...

Offline adriano

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2017, 09:38:29 AM »
Hi there everybody
Thanks also for the good reception comments of my Fritz Brun recordings -  ;)
Here the link to a chapter of my website dedicated to Brun, with more infos and 3 videos on the last three CDs of this series.
http://www.adrianomusic.com/styled-10/styled-13/index.html
I am here to accept all criticism and to answer questions!
Greetings from Switzerland!

snyprrr

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2017, 04:33:03 PM »
Hi there everybody
Thanks also for the good reception comments of my Fritz Brun recordings -  ;)
Here the link to a chapter of my website dedicated to Brun, with more infos and 3 videos on the last three CDs of this series.
http://www.adrianomusic.com/styled-10/styled-13/index.html
I am here to accept all criticism and to answer questions!
Greetings from Switzerland!

Hey!

Nice to see you made it here. I'll welcome you since admin is to busy playing word games in TheDiner ::).

I've had the String Quartet (with Schoeck) for a while, and always think of the Brun on a Swiss-like spring day. One can certainly sense 'the hills are alive' with that sunny and life affirming work.

What is the single work to turn one on to Brun, in your opinion? I see a d-minor Symphony...hmmm...

Offline adriano

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Re: Fritz Brun [1878-1959]
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2017, 12:06:48 AM »
Hi there, and thanks snyprrr  8)
Brun's music has to be listened carefully and various times in order to turn one in. Nothing for those listeners, who leand back in a sofa and just want to get carried away - or the others who do their ironing and cleaning, or read a newspaper at the same time; one has to "mentally collaborate". His 2nd Symphony is the most melodic and easy-going one. His 1st, a Romantic, but already very original statement. But try also his two Concertos.The d minor Symphony is the most intricate and strange. Then I would recommend his 8th and later on his 5th, which is perhaps his most original and dramatic.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 03:20:49 AM by adriano »