Author Topic: Pieces that have blown you away recently  (Read 27129 times)

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Offline Xenophanes

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #380 on: September 12, 2017, 09:08:34 AM »
One of the biggest mistake a newbie makes is starting a thread that already exists.  So I checked this out so I hope this a new idea

My music library is based on breath instead of depth.  Instead of fifty recordings of Beethoven's Fifth I would prefer to have fifty recordings of different symphonies. 

Since I am always on the lookout for new composers and music one of my favorite threads in another forum is "Pieces that have blown you away recently".  This is a thread where a person can post their experiences with a new work they have never heard before or a new composer.

This would not be a thread for a person who already has fifty recordings of Beethoven's Fifth and he just acquired his fifty-first.  This thread is for a person who had never heard Beethoven's Fifth and his initial exposure to it was awesome.

I will start by talking about recent discovery for me.

I subscribe to the BBC Music Magazine.  One of the there CD's had some piano music of Ravel and Faure.  I am not a fan of Faure.  When the Faure train left the station I was not on it.  This recording of some of his barcarolles and nocturnes blew me away.  :)

Sibelius, Luonnotar ----- sopranos: Mattila, Isokoski, Bryn-Julson, Soederstrom

I had heard Luonnotar before, but I recently really began to look into the text and I listened to some really stunning recordings of this piece, which must be some of the most demanding music for soprano.

Offline Daverz

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #381 on: September 17, 2017, 09:59:15 PM »
Violin Sonata No. 1 is a good follow up.  Shaham & Erez are very good.



And to make it a triptych from this same emotional landscape (with the Piano Quintet No. 1), add the String Quartet No. 2:



Excellent performance and recording from the Pro Arte Quartet and Laurel Records.


Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #382 on: September 19, 2017, 03:47:35 AM »
The main theme of Beethoven's 21st sonata keeps getting stuck in my head all the goddamn time  >:(



 ::)




 :D

Offline DaveF

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #383 on: September 19, 2017, 01:18:43 PM »
Until I bought a few of the Quatuor Diotima's discs in the recent Qobuz sale, I don't think I'd ever heard the "other" two movements of Barber's string quartet.  What an exquisite piece the first movement is.  All it lacks is a big scherzo and fugal finale to balance the whole structure.
"Just because I like something, it doesn't mean it's any good."

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #384 on: September 19, 2017, 10:52:19 PM »
Martinu's 4th Piano Concerto 'Incantations'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline pjme

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #385 on: September 19, 2017, 11:44:09 PM »
Martinu's 4th Piano Concerto 'Incantations'.

I discovered that wonderful score through this LP:



The Fantasia concertante ( concerto nr 5) is another favorite. The DGG LP/Cd (Margrit Weber / Kubelik) is a gem.



Yesterday I was blown away by James McMillan's viola concerto!

P.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 11:50:42 PM by pjme »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #386 on: September 20, 2017, 06:41:54 AM »
I discovered that wonderful score through this LP:



The Fantasia concertante ( concerto nr 5) is another favorite. The DGG LP/Cd (Margrit Weber / Kubelik) is a gem.



Yesterday I was blown away by James McMillan's viola concerto!

P.
Thanks for responding. Macmillan is one of those composers I need to investigate. The Head of Music at the school where I work was enthusing about his music (Symphony 4 in particular I think) when I was chatting to him over lunch last week.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline pjme

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #387 on: September 20, 2017, 02:10:49 PM »
Hi Vandermolen,

(this was earlier in the" What are you listening to" section):

A couple of minutes ago on BBC 3 : James Mc Millan's viola concerto. Second time only (earlier this year it was performed & broadcast in the Netherlands). Loved it even better this time - the viola hisses as a angry cat , chirps as anxious birds ... sings like an angel!

From the Guardian:https://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/jan/19/manon-james-macmillan-viola-lawrence-power-review

....
Lasting nearly 40 minutes, this inventive, three-movement piece exploits fully the lyrical qualities of the instrument, launching with a rhapsodic solo ascent and finding bold colours via some hushed string harmonics, dissonances and glissandi. Bright sounds of harp, xylophone, vibraphone and tubular bells offset some more mellow string sounds, including those from the soloist's 400-year-old instrument.

At the start, after what sounds like a backward cadence (as if singing Amen in reverse), the viola floats over a murky, indistinct orchestral layer with almost imperceptible cross-rhythms, until interrupted by a sparky oboe and cor anglais. The second movement blasts to life with a vast, noisy clatter of percussion and full orchestra, out of which the songful viola emerges.

The work, a major contribution to the repertory, is full of musical debate, not least between the solo viola and the four front-desk players of the viola and cello section, but has little in the way of show-off virtuosity for its own sake. In an unexpected gesture, the soloist finishes fractionally ahead of everyone else after some spectacular, rapid string crossing, leaving his comrades to play two final chords. Counter to its ponderous image, the viola triumphantly proves its fleet-footed ability to gallop home first. James MacMillan has said he loved writing for the instrument and its player. Lawrence Power, in turn, looked as if he adored playing it. The cheers suggested everyone was of the same mind.

Or:

But violist Lawrence Power’s extraordinary championship of the gift James MacMillan has given him might well prove to be the solo performance of the year – and it’s only January. MacMillan is such a natural communicator and from the two simple chords ushering in Power’s rhapsodic opening solo the compulsion to go where he led was a given. For a Scottish Catholic the tone of this solo – indeed much of the solo part – was (as the serendipity of the pairing would have it) hauntingly Hebraic, almost as if Bloch’s Shelomo now had a son and heir. But it was MacMillan’s fantastic ear for orchestral sound that turned his largish orchestra into an environment in which his soloist could hold court and shine and always be heard. Pitting the gruffly assertive and astonishingly virtuosic pyrotechnics of the solo part against equally virtuosic tuned percussion was one way – chesty ardour offset by sparkling iridescence above. Another was through the soloist’s affecting alliance with pairs of violas and cellos or solo strings. Or simply by counterpointing the fast moving solo part with slow moving and highly characteristic plainchant in the wind.

MacMillan’s innate theatricality (he and Mahler both) made for a gripping slow movement where indomitable brass chords and the roar of tam-tam cleared the floor for the soloist’s rapt song. This most songful, hymn-like, writing incorporating the scoops and swoops and catches of an emotive vocalise eventually arrived at an unforgettable “evaporation” of the song in shortening phrases so high and so barely voiced as to sound like they were no longer emanating from the instrument at all.

From:http://www.edwardseckerson.biz/reviews/london-philharmonic-orchestra-power-jurowski-royal-festival-hall-review/

Afaik, no recording yet.

Peter

Online kyjo

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #388 on: September 20, 2017, 03:51:39 PM »
Thanks for responding. Macmillan is one of those composers I need to investigate. The Head of Music at the school where I work was enthusing about his music (Symphony 4 in particular I think) when I was chatting to him over lunch last week.

MacMillan's Symphony no. 4 is a powerful work well worth investigating. Throughout the piece there is a contrast between violent, dissonant passages and passages of transcendent beauty. I find the extended cello soli about three-quarters of the way in particularly moving. I think you'd enjoy it, Jeffrey :)

Offline Cato

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #389 on: September 21, 2017, 10:37:35 AM »
From 1957, before Riley's In C, before Glass and Adams:

Proto-Minimalism  ???  from Miloslav Kabelac (or...?):

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0</a>

It takes a while for it to take off, but it takes off!
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline North Star

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #390 on: September 21, 2017, 10:53:40 AM »
From 1957, before Riley's In C, before Glass and Adams:

Proto-Minimalism  ???  from Miloslav Kabelac (or...?):

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0</a>

It takes a while for it to take off, but it takes off!

You're welcome, Cato8)

I've rather enjoyed all the symphonies (seven out of eight) I've heard so far, too.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 10:56:23 AM by North Star »
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Offline Cato

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #391 on: September 21, 2017, 01:22:08 PM »
You're welcome, Cato8)

I've rather enjoyed all the symphonies (seven out of eight) I've heard so far, too.

Yes, many thanks to alert member North Star for spreading the Musical Gospel According to Kabelac:D

YouTube does not offer all the symphonies, or at least I have not yet found them all!
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline North Star

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #392 on: September 21, 2017, 01:25:54 PM »
Yes, many thanks to alert member North Star for spreading the Musical Gospel According to Kabelac:D

YouTube does not offer all the symphonies, or at least I have not yet found them all!
There's the Supraphon set (without texts   >:() for the symphonies.  8)
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Offline Monsieur Croche

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #393 on: September 21, 2017, 01:56:51 PM »
From 1957, before Riley's In C, before Glass and Adams:

Proto-Minimalism  ???  from Miloslav Kabelac (or...?):

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0</a>

It takes a while for it to take off, but it takes off!

I'm glad you put it thus, Proto-Minimalism  ??? , because I don't hear a scrap of anything relating to what is called minimalism in the Kabelac.  Sure, the musical materials are a bit 'spare,' but what I heard sounds and plays out and through as a rather romantic piece in its musical ideas and gestures, but I heard nothing remotely minimalist, in procedures or aesthetic, if you will, anywhere.

Elliott Carter's Eight Etudes and a Fantasy for woodwind quartet predates (1950) this piece and Riley's very seminal In C   Though the Etudes are very brief, some are more directly in line with that arena of procedure(s) we later came to know as minimalism, (especially those that deal are studies on one interval, lol) at least those early stages of it ala Riley's In C, early Reich, Adams and Glass pieces.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/WqF96XKh64Q" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/WqF96XKh64Q</a>
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 02:04:29 PM by Monsieur Croche »
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Offline Ken B

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #394 on: September 21, 2017, 02:11:12 PM »
From 1957, before Riley's In C, before Glass and Adams:

Proto-Minimalism  ???  from Miloslav Kabelac (or...?):

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgeYpx-azF0</a>

It takes a while for it to take off, but it takes off!

That's a corker, Cato.
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #395 on: September 21, 2017, 06:31:02 PM »
I’m always blown away by Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 11, “The Year 1905”.
"Music must be beautiful, or it wouldn’t be worth the effort” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #396 on: September 23, 2017, 09:36:48 AM »
OHHHH YES MY SON!!! That GLORIOUS and EMPHATIC F major fortissimo that ends Strauss' Symphonia Domestica! WOOOAHHH!!!

Offline arpeggio

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #397 on: September 23, 2017, 11:45:25 AM »
OHHHH YES MY SON!!! That GLORIOUS and EMPHATIC F major fortissimo that ends Strauss' Symphonia Domestica! WOOOAHHH!!!

Have you just discovered this work?

Offline Cato

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #398 on: September 23, 2017, 01:18:20 PM »

I'm glad you put it thus, Proto-Minimalism  ??? , because I don't hear a scrap of anything relating to what is called minimalism in the Kabelac.  Sure, the musical materials are a bit 'spare,' but what I heard sounds and plays out and through as a rather romantic piece in its musical ideas and gestures, but I heard nothing remotely minimalist, in procedures or aesthetic, if you will, anywhere.


I did!  0:)  e.g. The subtle - and slow - use of small variations building and building until suddenly one realizes that one has entered new territory different from just a few minutes earlier!  Is there an almost static, or even manic, repetitiveness, such as one finds in Koyaanisqatsi?  No.  If you hear a basically Romantic piece, no problem!  8)

That's a corker, Cato.


Agreed!   0:)
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #399 on: September 24, 2017, 07:41:14 AM »
Have you just discovered this work?

No, but it always blows me away. That epilogue is just glorious marshalling of a huge orchestral juggernaut! Brilliantly bombastic and over-the-top!

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