Author Topic: Pieces that have blown you away recently  (Read 27381 times)

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Offline springrite

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #240 on: March 08, 2017, 06:30:48 PM »
Three pieces that have blown me recently, specifically three awesome cello concertos:

Miaskovsky: Passionately melancholic
Moeran: It's warm, somewhat heroic
Lutoslawski: The rarer and the one that left me the strangest feeling

Love all three, and of the three, perhaps love Lutoslowski the most!
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline jessop

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #241 on: March 09, 2017, 02:56:37 PM »
Tatjana Kozlova-Johannes – Horizontals

Unfortunately no recordings of it in aware of.

EDIT: Found one on her Soundcloud page https://soundcloud.com/tatjana-kozlova-johannes/tatjana-kozlova-horisontaalid

Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #242 on: March 10, 2017, 12:16:55 AM »
Wow!!!

https://youtu.be/EZecL3Fmqe8

Akira Nishimura - String Quartet No. 2

Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #243 on: March 10, 2017, 01:55:15 PM »
This morning:

Luigi Nono - Polifonica-Monodia-Ritmica
Luigi Nono - Como Una Ola De Fuerza Y Luz
Franz Liszt ‒ Années de pèlerinage, troisième année

Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #244 on: March 14, 2017, 10:20:56 PM »
I'm very astonished by the composer Julius Eastman:o :o

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #245 on: March 15, 2017, 06:43:20 AM »
I'm very astonished by the composer Julius Eastman:o :o

I listened to some Eastman not too long ago and found the music rather uninteresting. It just sounded like some rehashed, minimalistic twaddle. :-\ All IMHO of course.

Thread duty -

I’m constantly amazed by Ives’ Orchestral Set No. 2. For some musicologist (or whomever) to do an analysis on this work, it’d probably end up being the size of a novel. There’s just so much crammed into this work, but somehow Ives makes it all gel together --- a remarkable achievement (as so many of his scores are).
« Last Edit: March 15, 2017, 06:45:20 AM by Mirror Image »
"Music must be beautiful, or it wouldn’t be worth the effort” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #246 on: March 17, 2017, 03:00:53 PM »
I listened to some Eastman not too long ago and found the music rather uninteresting. It just sounded like some rehashed, minimalistic twaddle. :-\ All IMHO of course.

I don't know why you would call it "rehashed" when he was in there at the same time as all the other "minimalists".

I listened to his piano quartet called "Evil Nigger", which completely shocked me. It's an intense piece with an almost Ligetian approach to these slowly fast-moving staccato patterns between the four pianos.

As you'd know I'm not a big "minimalist" fan personally either, but I loved that piece  8)

Offline Alberich

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #247 on: March 18, 2017, 05:26:51 AM »
Miaskovsky cello sonata 2.
"I am a shadowy reflection of you."

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #248 on: March 18, 2017, 09:38:32 PM »
Holmboe's symphonies (specially 1-8). Simply astonishing pieces, I loved that characteristic and strong rhythm in each one of them.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #249 on: March 18, 2017, 11:50:40 PM »
Back from a performance of Rimsky's "The legend of Kitezh" with Opera Bergen last night. Strange story, not much drama, but: the score of this opera is so mindnumbingly beautiful. This simply must be the most wonderful orchestral score of any opera ever.

Offline opaquer

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #250 on: March 19, 2017, 03:54:45 AM »
Debussy's Trio for harp, viola and flute.+ Nocturnes

Haven't heard either in a while and HOLY SHIT they're good!! Debussy was such a pioneer, he's so overlooked in that regard. There is so much of Varese (albeit not with the percussion or block form) and later texturalism/spectralism encoded in his music.
He was so radical, even more than Schoenberg in my experience. He pretty much threw out all traditional forms out the window (unlike Schoenberg, but the point isn't to compare).

The orchestration is so free to float but so tightly strung. I'm about to have another Debussy phase ain't I?  ;)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #251 on: March 19, 2017, 06:47:29 AM »
Debussy's Trio for harp, viola and flute.+ Nocturnes

Haven't heard either in a while and HOLY SHIT they're good!! Debussy was such a pioneer, he's so overlooked in that regard. There is so much of Varese (albeit not with the percussion or block form) and later texturalism/spectralism encoded in his music.
He was so radical, even more than Schoenberg in my experience. He pretty much threw out all traditional forms out the window (unlike Schoenberg, but the point isn't to compare).

The orchestration is so free to float but so tightly strung. I'm about to have another Debussy phase ain't I?  ;)

I’m not sure if I agree that Debussy was overlooked as an innovator. He’s acknowledged all over the world as someone who broke new ground and tore down barriers. By dissolving the musical influence of Wagnerism and going his own way, his music has impacted the 20th and 21st Centuries like he never would have imagined.
"Music must be beautiful, or it wouldn’t be worth the effort” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #252 on: March 19, 2017, 06:59:48 AM »
Strauss' tome poem, Macbeth. Not a new piece to me by any means, but considering the output of great tome poems, operas, concertos, etc. from Strauss I think this one gets overlooked, even by me. Composed when Strauss was between the ages of 22-24 years old, the piece doesn't reach the level of orchestral brilliance as some of his later works, but I'm really impressed with the eclectic colors and styles that young Strauss injected in this work.

Listened to a new purchase of Macbeth the other day, performed by Maazel/Vienna, and was truly affected. It had been too long since I listened to it.

Offline jessop

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #253 on: March 19, 2017, 08:35:05 PM »
This is so awesome

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/vcEeN9qAVmw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/vcEeN9qAVmw</a>

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #254 on: March 19, 2017, 08:44:18 PM »
I’m still shook up after revisiting one of my musical hero’s works for string orchestra: Bartók’s Divertimento.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/fEhacfM2S-U" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/fEhacfM2S-U</a>
"Music must be beautiful, or it wouldn’t be worth the effort” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Todd

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #255 on: March 20, 2017, 11:41:41 AM »



This is the year of Marie-Luise Hinrichs for me.  Her two discs of Padre Antonio Soler are brilliant, with fantastically nuanced playing.  As great as they are, they didn't really prepare me for this disc of a dozen piano transcriptions of pieces by Hildegard von Bingen, five short pieces by Armenian composer and spiritualist/mystic George Gurdjieff, and one brief original work by the pianist.  Ms Hinrichs has entered the realm of Michel Block's best work with this disc.  Hinrichs writes in the liner notes that she only discovered Hildegard von Bingen in 2005, and soon thereafter transcribed pieces during a very spiritual time for her.  She states that she transcribed with God's help and that while working she sensed a second voice that was not hers.  I'm not spiritual myself, but the results point to the absolute sincerity of what she writes.  The Bingen pieces display a very serious, very devout, and very loving spirituality.  There's just no other way to describe it. 

The music is often simplicity itself, with beautiful monophonic melodies throughout.  Hinrichs fleshes the music out for piano wonderfully, and never overdoes it.  The transcriptions are not about virtuosic showmanship, but rather they focus on musical truth.  And they allow Hinrichs to display an amazing, soft variability of touch.  Piano and pianissimo come in many shades, and in a few pieces she achieves pianissimo as delicate and quiet as anything I've heard from Yaeko Yamane or Julian Gorus.  Hinrichs achieves some of this with generous una corda use, but sometimes she seems to be barely nudging the keys.  But there's much more than that.  Though generally quiet and spiritual, Hinrichs infuses the playing with delicately nuanced and perfectly judged rhythmic vitality.  Her rhythmic acumen is even more on display in the Gurdjieff pieces, which evoke the Orient in a hazy, sometimes languid, but always intensely appealing way.  As with fellow German pianist Ragna Schirmer, Hinrichs weaves pieces from seemingly disparate sources very well.  Indeed, I'd say Hinrichs does a better job here than Schirmer does in her traversal of Liszt's Annees.  Hinrichs' one original composition very much fits in with the conception of the disc as a whole.  I suppose it might be possible to find the strumming of the piano strings that start a few pieces, and a couple string plucks, to be a bit kitschy, and I usually find such devices unnecessary, but even those work splendidly here.  The music is so captivating, though in a very calming and reassuring way, that when I first spun the disc, I did something I almost never do: I played it twice, back to back.  The disc offers an hour of radiant serenity. 

Sound is inside-the-piano close, with pedal noise and damper noise.  It does not detract in the least, and it is less obvious through headphones, which offer an even more enveloping experience than speakers.

One of my purchases of the century.


(YouTube has some video of Hinrichs playing some of the music live in small settings, as well as what appears to be all the individual tracks from this disc, but they ultimately do not do full justice to the music.  It deserves to be heard in full resolution through decent headphones or standard gear for optimum effect.)
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #256 on: March 20, 2017, 11:51:43 AM »



This is the year of Marie-Luise Hinrichs for me.  Her two discs of Padre Antonio Soler are brilliant, with fantastically nuanced playing.  As great as they are, they didn't really prepare me for this disc of a dozen piano transcriptions of pieces by Hildegard von Bingen, five short pieces by Armenian composer and spiritualist/mystic George Gurdjieff, and one brief original work by the pianist.  Ms Hinrichs has entered the realm of Michel Block's best work with this disc.  Hinrichs writes in the liner notes that she only discovered Hildegard von Bingen in 2005, and soon thereafter transcribed pieces during a very spiritual time for her.  She states that she transcribed with God's help and that while working she sensed a second voice that was not hers.  I'm not spiritual myself, but the results point to the absolute sincerity of what she writes.  The Bingen pieces display a very serious, very devout, and very loving spirituality.  There's just no other way to describe it. 

The music is often simplicity itself, with beautiful monophonic melodies throughout.  Hinrichs fleshes the music out for piano wonderfully, and never overdoes it.  The transcriptions are not about virtuosic showmanship, but rather they focus on musical truth.  And they allow Hinrichs to display an amazing, soft variability of touch.  Piano and pianissimo come in many shades, and in a few pieces she achieves pianissimo as delicate and quiet as anything I've heard from Yaeko Yamane or Julian Gorus.  Hinrichs achieves some of this with generous una corda use, but sometimes she seems to be barely nudging the keys.  But there's much more than that.  Though generally quiet and spiritual, Hinrichs infuses the playing with delicately nuanced and perfectly judged rhythmic vitality.  Her rhythmic acumen is even more on display in the Gurdjieff pieces, which evoke the Orient in a hazy, sometimes languid, but always intensely appealing way.  As with fellow German pianist Ragna Schirmer, Hinrichs weaves pieces from seemingly disparate sources very well.  Indeed, I'd say Hinrichs does a better job here than Schirmer does in her traversal of Liszt's Annees.  Hinrichs' one original composition very much fits in with the conception of the disc as a whole.  I suppose it might be possible to find the strumming of the piano strings that start a few pieces, and a couple string plucks, to be a bit kitschy, and I usually find such devices unnecessary, but even those work splendidly here.  The music is so captivating, though in a very calming and reassuring way, that when I first spun the disc, I did something I almost never do: I played it twice, back to back.  The disc offers an hour of radiant serenity. 

Sound is inside-the-piano close, with pedal noise and damper noise.  It does not detract in the least, and it is less obvious through headphones, which offer an even more enveloping experience than speakers.

One of my purchases of the century.


(YouTube has some video of Hinrichs playing some of the music live in small settings, as well as what appears to be all the individual tracks from this disc, but they ultimately do not do full justice to the music.  It deserves to be heard in full resolution through decent headphones or standard gear for optimum effect.)

Immediately headed to my wish list. Thank you for the greatly detailed post, Todd.

Offline North Star

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #257 on: March 20, 2017, 11:56:42 AM »
Immediately headed to my wish list. Thank you for the greatly detailed post, Todd.
+1
"Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it." - Confucius

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Offline Todd

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #258 on: March 24, 2017, 05:50:53 AM »



The final disc of Olivier Vernet's traversal of Liszt's organ music is a duo disc where he and pianist Laurent Cabasso play re-transcriptions of four of Liszt's symphonic poems: Mazeppa (the non-transcendental form), Les Preludes, Orpheus, and Prometheus.  On paper, this does not necessarily seem as though it should work all that well.  In practice, it most certainly does.  The works end up sounding like over the top, gothic piano concertos.  The piano is more forward physically, and sounds slightly stage right, and instead of an orchestra backing the pianist, the organ generates a wall of sound behind the puny piano.  Vernet and Cabasso keep things very well balanced, with the piano getting plenty of attention.  Sometimes, when the massive bass pipes fire off, the piano sounds as though it is an instrument emerging from - escaping, even - the gaping maw of a giant musical beast; the low frequencies seem to emanate from all around, all at once, and the effect is dazzling.  No, this is not deep, profound music being delivered as solemn as a mass, or anything like that, but it is an outstanding scaling up of Liszt's most fantastically glitzy tendencies.  Completely unexpectedly, it ends up the most exciting and captivating disc of this already excellent set.  I'd love to hear something like this in person, though I doubt I ever get the chance.  A great good time.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Florestan

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Re: Pieces that have blown you away recently
« Reply #259 on: March 28, 2017, 05:14:23 AM »
Jacob van Eyck - Engels Nachtegaeltje (the English Nightingale)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ZvDb5EmhfZI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ZvDb5EmhfZI</a>

This is good but the performance by Erik Bosgraaf on this 3-CD set is indeed mindblowing.

Les sanglots longs
Des violons
De l'automne
Blessent mon coeur
D'une langueur
Monotone.

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