Author Topic: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]  (Read 4477 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« on: September 18, 2016, 12:13:03 AM »
Like Eugene Zador, another relatively minor, but good, Hungarian composer.
In much of his lifetime, he was more renown for his role as a teacher, rather than his own music.
However, he was still the recipient of the Coolidge Prize (1922) for the Second Quartet, the State Prize (1933) for the Suite op.18, and two Kossuth Prizes (1950, 1960).

" A composer of highly accomplished technique, Weiner was essentially a Romantic, and he remained opposed to the innovations of Stravinsky and Bartók, while sharing to some extent the nationalist concerns of Bartók and Kodály. Never a folk music collector himself, he was introduced to folksongs by Lajtha; the first compositional fruit was the Suite op.18. But the more fundamental influences on his music were Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Bizet and, occasionally, Brahms; under their influence he developed a style of clarity and balance,  "

Chamber music
============================================

 Scherzo, String quintet, 1905
 Magyar ábránd [Hungarian Fantasy], tárogató, cimb, 1905–6, lost
 String Quartet no.1, E, op.4, 1906
 String Trio, g, op.6, 1908
 Ballade, op.8, clarinet/viola, Piano, 1911
 Sonata no.1, D, op.9, Violin, Piano, 1911, orchd 1958
 Sonata no.2, f, op.11, Violin, Piano, 1918, orchd 1957
 String Quartet no.2, f, op.13, 1921
 Romanze, op.14, Cello, Piano, 1921
 Divertimento no.2, op.24a, arr. String qt (1965)
 String Quartet no.3 (Pastorale, phantaisie et fugue), G, op.26, 1938
 Peregi verbunk [Pereg Recruiting Dance], op.40, clarinet/Violin/violaa, Piano, 1951, arr. wind quintet, arr. String quintet, 1957
 Bevezetés és csürdöngöl? [Introduction and Stamping Dance], wind quintet/String quintet, 1957
 3 magyar népi tanc [3 Hungarian Folkdances], Violin, Piano (1962)

Orchestral
=============================================================

A gondolás [The Gondolier] (op, 3, G. Szini, I. Balla), collab. A. Szirmai, unperf., lost
 Csongor és Tünde (incid music, M. Vörösmarty), op.10, 1913, Budapest, 6 Dec 1916
 Csongor és Tünde (ballet, 1, L. Màrkus, after Vörösmarty), 1927, Budapest, 8 Nov 1930
Scherzo, op.1, 1905, destroyed
 Serenade, op.3, small orch, 1906
 Farsang [Carnival], op.5, small orch, 1907
 Csongor és az ördögfiak [Csongor and the Devil’s Sons], op.10, orch, 1913 [from ballet]
 Csongor és Tünde, ballet suite, op.10b (1937)
 Piano Concertino, op.15, 1923
 Katonásdi [Toy Soldiers], op.16a, 1924
 Magyar népi táncok [Hungarian Folk Dances], suite, op.18, 1931
 Divertimento no.1, op.20, str, 1923
 Pastorale, phantaisie et fugue, op.23, str, 1938
 Divertimento no.2 (Magyar népi dallamok), op.24, strings, 1938 [arr. op.24a]
 Divertimento no.3 (Impressioni ungheresi), op.25, 1950
Ballata, op.28, clarinet, orch, 1949 [arr. op.8]
 Romanze, op.29, cello, harp, strings, 1949 [arr. op.14]
 Változatok egy magyar népdal fölött [Variations on a Hungarian folksong], op.30, 1949
 Preludio, notturno e scherzo diabolico, op.31, 1950 [arr. op.7]
 Divertimento no.4, op.38, 1951
 Divertimento no.5, op.39, 1951
 3 magyar népi tánc [3 Hungarian Folkdances], salon orch (1951)
 Ünnepi hangok [Festal Sounds], 1951
 Toldi, Op.43, symphonic poem, after Janos Arany, 1952 (revised 1957)
 Passacaglia, op.44, 1955 [arr. op.17]
 Magyar gyermek- és népdalok [Hungarian Children’s Songs and Folksongs], small orch, 1955
 Violin Conc. no.2, f, op.45 [arr. Violin Sonata no.2], 1957
 Violin Conc. no.1, D, op.41, 1958 [arr. op.9]

Piano music
=====================================================

Caprice, 1908
 Passacaglia, op.2, 1904, lost
 Farsang [Carnival], pf [arr. op.5]
 Präludium, Nocturne und Scherzo, op.7 (1911)
 Miniatür-Bilder, op.12, 1917
 Passacaglia, op.17, 1936
 6 magyar parasztdal [6 Hungarian Peasant Songs], op.19, 1932
 Magyar parasztdalok, op.19a, 1934
 Lakodalmas [Wedding Dance], op.21, 1936
 Magyar parasztdalok, op.22, 1937
 3 magyar népi tánc [3 Hungarian Folkdances] (1941)
 20 könny? kis darab a zongorázó ifjúság számára [20 easy little pieces for piano-playing young people], op.27 (1949)
 Változatok egy magyar népdal fölött [Variations on a Hungarian Folksong], op.32, 2 pf, 1950
 Magyar parasztdalok, opp.33–4 (1950)
 Suite, op.35, 2 pf, 1950, lost [arr. op.18]
 3 kis négykezes zongoradarab [3 little pieces for pf duet], op.36, 1950
 Farsang [Carnival], op.37, 2 pf, 1950, lost [arr. op.5]
 Magyar népi muzsika [Hungarian Folk Music], op.42 (1953)


from the Hungarian World Encyclopedia:

Weiner, Leo (Budapest, 16 April 1885 - Budapest, 14 September 1960) – Composer , music educator. He received his first music and piano lessons from his brother, but soon he taught himself. He entered the Musical High School in Budapest in 1901. He studied with
János (John) Koessler and completed his musical studies at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest (1902-1906). Afterwards he took a long study tour in Vienna, Berlin, Leipzig and Paris. He taught briefly at a Music School, and he was a coach of solo singers at the Budapest Comic Opera (Vígopera). He taught at the Academy of Music from 1908 to 1957 and he continued it there even after his retirement. In 1928, he founded a chamber orchestra under his leadership, which performed without a conductor. He composed some 30 major musical works, including his first orchestral work, Carnival (Farsang) in 1907; the Hungarian Fantasy, Serenade, Op 3, a String Trio, three String Quartets, two Violin Sonatas, five Divertimenti for orchestra, a symphonic poem, numerous Chamber and Piano Pieces and the Fox Dance (Róka Tánc). He had an interest in the Hungarian folk music. Leo Weiner was one of the leading Hungarian music educators of the first half of the twentieth century. His name is attached to the training of Weiner and Bartók string quartets. He is credited the reputation of Hungarian musicians for their accuracy, qualities and depth of interpretation in chamber music. Weiner was a skilled composer, one of the outstanding representatives of the so-called conservative form of new Hungarian music. He received numerous awards including the Coolidge Prize, Schwunda Prize, the Volkmann Prize, the Erkel Prize, the Haynald Prize, and twice the Kossuth Prize. A music school bears his name. – B: 1031, 1197, 0883, 1153, T: 7103.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2016, 08:51:46 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2016, 12:16:05 AM »


The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 12:19:40 AM »
This one has excellent notes (as usual) from Hyperion:



   




http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2016/Apr/Weiner_Csongor_8573491.htm

   



^ ^ ^

Weiner’s Csongor and Tünde, Op. 10 accompanied him throughout his life, and he regarded it as his magnum opus. It is based on the dramatic poem written by Mihály Vörösmarty (1800-1855) in 1830. It is a love story about a prince and a fairy who struggle for happiness against the attacks of evil, and is widely known in world literature. Vörösmarty created a philosophical story out of the simple fairy tale, and his enchantingly beautiful Hungarian text has raised it to the level of an exceptional masterpiece, one of the most important works of Hungarian literature. The play was not considered performable until the director of the Hungarian National Theatre, Ede Paulay (1836–1894) staged it with great success. The first incidental music for it was composed by Gyula Erkel (1841–1909), the son of Ferenc Erkel, for the premiere on December 1st, 1879. In 1913 the directorate of the National Theatre commissioned new incidental music from Leo Weiner, and the composer finished the score on November 1st the same year. However, its performance requirements and the size of the orchestra needed were beyond the means of the National Theatre, and the premiere was postponed. The composer was keen to present his work, so initially the scherzo called Prince Csongor and the Goblins was performed in public on February 8th, 1914 with the title Intermezzo. This piece is still often performed today. One year later the first Suite (consisting of four movements) taken from the work was performed. Eventually the date of the premiere was set for November 1916, but again it was cancelled, due to the death on the 21st of the Emperor Franz Joseph, King of Hungary. A few days later however, on 6th December, 1916, the performance took place. It was greeted with enormous acclaim by both the public and the critics.
As the genre of incidental music for the stage is fixed to performances of the play, Weiner compiled several suites from different parts of the 22-movement piece for the concert podium. He considered the six-movement version to be final. He also composed a ballet from the music of the work so that it could have a theatrical life independent of the play. This one-act piece consists of nine movements and was first performed at the Budapest Opera House on November 8th, 1930. After World War II the ballet was revived. Weiner thoroughly transformed the music and expanded it to 14 movements. The first performance was on June 6th, 1959, one year before the death of the composer. On this recording the final version of the work, based on the manuscript score preserved at the Hungarian Opera House, has been used.
Synopsis
Cast:
Prince Csongor
Tünde the Fairy
Mirígy the Witch
Ledér, Mirígy’s daughter
Ilma, Tünde’s maid
Balga the Henchman, a peasant boy
Goblins, Phantoms, Witches,
Fairies and Guardian Spirits
Vörösmarty’s play is multi-layered and full of meaning, but the ballet version concentrates on the love interest, so the story resembles more the folk-inspired sixteenth-century fairy tale by Albert Gergei that served as the basis for Vörösmarty’s poem.
[2] No. 1. Csongor, a young prince searching for happiness on his long wanderings, is walking along tired when he sees the foliage of a golden apple tree. He is surprised to see Mirígy, a witch, tied to the tree. She implores him to release her. The good-hearted young man unties her, but the wicked witch curses him. [3] No. 2. The apples start to shine and Tünde, a fairy, appears in the sparkling light. They fall in love at first sight. After their love duet they lie down under the tree and fall asleep. A fairy choir sings. [4] No. 3. Tünde’s fairy companions arrive with Ilma, Tünde’s maid. Their playful dance is interrupted by the arrival of the witch. The fairies run away, but Ilma hides nearby, sensing evil but feeling afraid of the witch. Mirígy sneaks towards the lovers and steals the fairy veil that carries Tünde’s magic power. She starts a triumphant dance and Tünde is startled out of her sleep. [5] No. 4. Tünde must leave forever because she has lost her veil and Csongor may not see her any more. She bids him farewell and departs on her long journey with Ilma. [6] No. 5. Csongor follows them in despair, seeking the newly found happiness he has so quickly lost, no matter how long it takes. [7] No. 6, Scene Two: At the crossroads, three goblins chase a fox who is a phantom, and is really Mirígy’s daughter, Ledér. She dances with the goblins, teasing them. She then playfully multiplies them and herself. They run away scared, chased by the phantoms. [8] No. 7. Balga, a peasant boy, arrives. He is also seeking his love, as he has lost his wife, Ilma, just as Csongor has lost Tünde. Csongor arrives and adopts Balga to be his servant. [9] No. 8. The goblins enter again, fighting over their inheritance, a magic cloak that makes its owner invisible and takes him wherever he tells it to go. The goblins ask Csongor to dispense judgement. He tricks them into letting him have the cloak and flies off to find Tünde. [10] No. 9, Scene Three: We see the witch Mirígy in her den, where she aims to acquire Prince Csongor for her daughter. She covers her daughter with the stolen veil, which immediately makes her beautiful. Csongor arrives, having been attracted by Mirígy’s magic, which is more powerful than the goblins’ magic cloak. Csongor begins an amorous dance with the phantom, thinking it is Tünde. Balga arrives with Ilma and they also take Ledér to be Tünde until the real Tünde arrives. Csongor tears the veil off Ledér and is astonished to see with whom he has danced. Then Mirígy intervenes and grabs the veil and Csongor as well, due to the magic power of the veil. [11] No. 10. The fourth scene is the Kingdom of the Night. The despairing Tünde is being consoled by the fairies of the night, but they cannot alleviate her pain. [12] No. 11. We are again at Mirígy’s den. Ledér keeps tempting Csongor in different ways, but the young man resists. Mirígy takes the initiative again, a real Witches’ Sabbath takes place, but it is useless. True love is stronger than any evil art. In the end Csongor manages to grab the veil and the witches have to escape. [13] No. 12. The witch’s homestead sinks down and our hero finds himself near the golden apple tree of the first scene. He adoringly gazes at his lover’s veil, remembering Tünde, then falls asleep exhausted. [14] No. 13. The guardian fairies arrive and bring a new veil for Tünde, but she chooses earthly happiness and Csongor instead of being a fairy. Balga arrives with Ilma, whom he has finally found, and they walk happily towards their hut. [15] No. 14. Tünde wakes up Csongor and the choir of fairies sings about eternal love: “Come sweetheart, come with me and enjoy the night, the only thing now awake is love.”
    ~ ~ ~ István Kassai
« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 05:24:14 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2016, 12:23:45 AM »
Thanks. Just ordered this on the strength of your recommendation. Gets good reviews on Amazon UK. I like the cover image and all for £3.00!

« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 12:25:29 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2016, 12:29:59 AM »
Looks like a great buy!
And FLORESTAN - look! ^ - a great Romanian composer is also on it! 

You poof-head.   :P
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2016, 04:39:11 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IHiPzZYZRU



This piece might be best for newcomers - very chromatic.
There is also a suite for the ballet.



https://hungarotonmusic.com/classical/csongor-and-tunde-p4294.html
« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 04:41:45 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2016, 05:31:51 AM »






   

« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 05:35:08 AM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2016, 12:28:19 AM »


^ click to expand

The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2016, 12:55:19 AM »


1960's vinyl LP issue
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2016, 09:33:01 PM »
Thanks. Just ordered this on the strength of your recommendation. Gets good reviews on Amazon UK. I like the cover image and all for £3.00!

Did this pop in yet?
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2016, 05:34:22 AM »
Did this pop in yet?
Not yet - any time soon I hope. Am camping out by post-box in eager anticipation.  8)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #12 on: September 22, 2016, 06:32:36 AM »
I listened to some Weiner the other day (I believe the work was Divertimento No. 3) and it was pleasant, but I'd just assume listen to Bartok's Hungarian Sketches instead. :-\
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2016, 11:23:27 AM »
Did this pop in yet?
It was there when I got home today and I have already played the Leo Weiner 'Hungarian Folkdance Suite' three times. It is an immensely enjoyable and inspiriting work. I especially like the slow movement but the whole work is very engaging. Sections reminded me of Respighi or Copland and the recording is stupendous; furthermore the violin soloist is the late great Hugh Bean who is the soloist on my favourite version of The Lark Ascending by Vaughan Williams. So, many thanks for the recommendation of this fine composer. I will continue to play this very entertaining CD through with much pleasure. Enchant was a good short-lived mid-price label on Chandos - I picked up several fine CDs from them including the complete Madetoja symphonies, Moeran's Symphony (Handley) and Violin and Cello concertos and Sibelius tone poems conducted by Segerstam.

After a frustrating early part to this evening trying to assemble a lawn mower  (>:D) this music has revived my spirits.
 :)
« Last Edit: September 22, 2016, 11:56:42 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2016, 01:42:24 PM »
Grab either the ballet suite or the Naxos issue of the ballet - that has quite a bit of haunting, Romantic stuff on it.

MI - Bartok and Weiner are very different composers/styles of music.
There's room for both in the world.
I may have to increase the dosage of your experimental drug!
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2016, 04:09:20 PM »
After a frustrating early part to this evening trying to assemble a lawn mower  (>:D) this music has revived my spirits.
 :)

My New Zealand model came pre-assembled: 
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2016, 05:23:23 PM »

MI - Bartok and Weiner are very different composers/styles of music.
There's room for both in the world.
I may have to increase the dosage of your experimental drug!

Be that as it may, I still feel rather indifferent to his music. :-\
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2016, 07:48:39 PM »
from one composition???
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline Scion7

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2016, 08:07:01 PM »
The symphonic poem, Toldi Op.43 - after Arany's poetry.
Hungaroton has let this slip out of print, but there are digital downloads available.

Toldi, Miklós (Nicholas) (Around 1320 - 22 November 1390) – Folk-hero. He was a noble landowner in County Bihar in Eastern Hungary, whose name was preserved in folk traditions as a strong, valiant man (vitéz). In folk traditions, the figure of Miklós Toldi remained the longest in memory in Counties Nógrád and Bihar, where they emphasize his physical strength. The Toldi figure was considered fictional for a long time as there was very little data left about his life. Based on documents, Áron Szilády pointed out that György (George) Toldi and Miklós Toldi actually existed in the time of Kings Charles Robert (Károly) (1307-1342), and Louis the Great (1342-1382). In 1350, Miklós Toldi was mentioned as Sub-Prefect and Commander of the Castle of Pozsony (now Bratislava, Slovakia). In 1383 and 1385 he is mentioned as Lord-Lieutenant of County Szabolcs. As Mercenary Commander, he participated in the Italian campaign of King Louis the Great. In 1359, he was to bring two lion cubs from Florence, as instructed by his lord. The earliest and most detailed source about him is the work of Péter Ilosvai Selymes, The History of the Outstanding Accomplishments of the Celebrated Illustrious Miklós Toldi (Az híres nevezetes Toldi Miklósnak jeles cselekedeteieről és bajnokosodásáról való historia) (Debrecen, 1574). The best-known work on Miklós Toldi is the Toldi-trilogy of János (John) Arany: Toldi, Toldi’s Love (Toldi szerelme), The Evening of Toldi (Toldi estéje). The poet was motivated to write this work, because near to his village of birth, Nagyszalonta, there is the Unfinished Tower (Csonka-torony) that belonged, according to tradition, to the Toldi family.



^ to enlarge, click the image


http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/Mar09/Weiner_toldi_hcd32608.htm

http://mek.oszk.hu/00500/00595/html/epics2.htm
« Last Edit: September 22, 2016, 08:50:13 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leo Weiner [1885-1960]
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2016, 09:21:50 PM »
My New Zealand model came pre-assembled: 
Yes, I need that type!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).