Author Topic: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions  (Read 5710 times)

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Offline Rons_talking

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #100 on: November 17, 2017, 10:57:04 AM »
Hey everyone, the new thing is here. I was hoping to have it done by the end of October, but a week over ain't so bad. Hope y'all like it!

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oyXw0NQV-qc" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oyXw0NQV-qc</a>

P.S.: Downloads are coming, but following some awkwardness surrounding the continued hosting of archives at the usual location I am in the process of migrating the back catalogue to a new place. Stay tuned.

Hey, nice work! All of your work has  (to me) a sense of spontaneity to it, regardless of your macro-structure. I find that lacking in a lot of contemporary music but you've got it and it's good!  I also like the use of quotation and the space you give this work. Well done...

Offline Crudblud

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #101 on: November 18, 2017, 08:53:24 AM »
I'll apologize, a bit, though for not yet attending to Starlight Revue.  Woolly week at the office, Triad concerts this weekend, and my wife & I are getting ready to travel next week.
No need at all, Karl. You lead a full life, that's nothing to apologise for. Good luck with your concerts, and I hope the weather is good for your journey!

Hey, nice work! All of your work has  (to me) a sense of spontaneity to it, regardless of your macro-structure. I find that lacking in a lot of contemporary music but you've got it and it's good!  I also like the use of quotation and the space you give this work. Well done...
Thanks Ron! In this case a planned macrostructure may well have been the wellspring of spontaneity. Having the instrumentation grow and shrink and otherwise change over course of the piece forced me to find ways of handling familiar instruments in often unfamiliar combinations, which I think kept the potential for surprise fairly high.

By the way, I messed up...

5. Quartet I: Harpsichord, bandoneon, Eng. horn, cello

There ain't no stinkin' cellos in that there quartet! 'Tis a marimba, plain as day! That's what I get for doing it from memory instead of using my notes. That one's a freebie: any other mistakes, I'll be hiding under my desk until we've all forgotten about them.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #102 on: November 21, 2017, 05:23:04 AM »
Cheers!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Crudblud

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #103 on: December 15, 2017, 09:45:06 AM »
Couple o' short shorts f'yez.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/CgIWW7UVYzU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/CgIWW7UVYzU</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ELOZ-Iw_9rY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ELOZ-Iw_9rY</a>

A merry Krizmus to you and yours, foax.

Offline Crudblud

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #104 on: December 17, 2017, 08:22:47 AM »
Posted up a big ol' essay of potentially minor interest to people on this forum. I haven't seen much or really any of what I talk about in the essay here on GMG, but those of you who frequent or have in the past frequented TalkClassical, or who have ever had the misfortune of being possessed by morbid curiosity regarding comment sections on YouTube videos, will probably know very well what I'm talking about.

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #105 on: December 17, 2017, 08:40:07 AM »
Posted up a big ol' essay of potentially minor interest to people on this forum. I haven't seen much or really any of what I talk about in the essay here on GMG, but those of you who frequent or have in the past frequented TalkClassical, or who have ever had the misfortune of being possessed by morbid curiosity regarding comment sections on YouTube videos, will probably know very well what I'm talking about.

I don't recall when I first started hearing "film composers are the new classical composers/true classical composers today," but it's always struck me as a bizarre claim.  People who say this seem to have a very shallow understanding of what classical music is or can be.

Also, calling something "classical music" does not imply anything about quality (at least not in the modern usage), so I find it odd when people think that the best of the surviving popular music of the 20th century will eventually be considered "classical."

If people want to defend popular music/jazz/film scores/video game scores/metal, they should discuss its merits rather than creating dubious connections to concert music.  It doesn't create the patina of respectability that these people imagine it does.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2017, 09:04:42 AM by Mahlerian »

Offline Crudblud

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #106 on: December 17, 2017, 08:02:14 PM »
I don't recall when I first started hearing "film composers are the new classical composers/true classical composers today," but it's always struck me as a bizarre claim.  People who say this seem to have a very shallow understanding of what classical music is or can be.

Also, calling something "classical music" does not imply anything about quality (at least not in the modern usage), so I find it odd when people think that the best of the surviving popular music of the 20th century will eventually be considered "classical."

If people want to defend popular music/jazz/film scores/video game scores/metal, they should discuss its merits rather than creating dubious connections to concert music.  It doesn't create the patina of respectability that these people imagine it does.

In some cases it is just a matter of "it sounds somewhat like X to me therefore it is X", an ignorance that could possibly be challenged assuming the person making the claim is open to the idea that they could be wrong, but on the internet especially people take a position with little or no basis than their own initial reaction to something and don't back down no matter the evidence or quality of argument presented against it. The resulting arguments are always insubstantial and almost always result in people calling each other idiots while neither side has any real understanding of the subject.

It's one of the rare instances where I find that the massively overused word "pretentious" is actually applicable. I didn't use it in the essay because I think it has taken on too much cultural baggage to be viable for general usage, it's the best way to turn a discussion into a mudslinging contest, but it's highly accurate in describing this phenomenon.

On your last point, I think part of the problem comes from the idea that one's musical taste must be defended in the first place. What's interesting to me is that so often it seems to be the case that the defence is the starting position, it's not a response to anything, it's preemptive action against something that probably won't even occur unless you go looking for it. And yes, engaging with a given piece or type of music on its own terms is always the best policy, trying to make of it something that it is not is just plain wrongheaded.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #107 on: December 18, 2017, 05:21:09 AM »
Tangentially, on the theme of the concert hall conveying any kind of legitimacy:  I find John Williams’s music for the screen superior to any of the “concert music” he has written.  My personal working hypothesis there is, that in the case of his movie soundtracks, he had others to whom his work needed to answer.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #108 on: December 18, 2017, 08:38:25 AM »
Tangentially, on the theme of the concert hall conveying any kind of legitimacy:  I find John Williams’s music for the screen superior to any of the “concert music” he has written.  My personal working hypothesis there is, that in the case of his movie soundtracks, he had others to whom his work needed to answer.

Without making any comparison in terms of quality, I think the case of Wagner may also be instructive in that his "absolute music" is, almost exclusively, lackluster compared to the dramatic projects that inspired him.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Crudblud's Craptacular C(r)ompositions
« Reply #109 on: December 18, 2017, 10:23:18 AM »
Without making any comparison in terms of quality, I think the case of Wagner may also be instructive in that his "absolute music" is, almost exclusively, lackluster compared to the dramatic projects that inspired him.

Aye, that thought crossed my mind, I do admit.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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