Author Topic: Louis Couperin  (Read 8693 times)

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Online Mandryka

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Re: Louis Couperin
« Reply #80 on: August 05, 2019, 02:22:33 AM »
Here's one for Milk

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/KY3lY1ZVup8" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/KY3lY1ZVup8</a>
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline milk

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Re: Louis Couperin
« Reply #81 on: August 07, 2019, 10:15:26 PM »
Here's one for Milk

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/KY3lY1ZVup8" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/KY3lY1ZVup8</a>
Indeed! That’s a pleasure. Guitar kind of equals everything out and make baroque sound like Impressionism.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Louis Couperin
« Reply #82 on: August 14, 2019, 05:55:21 AM »



I think this is absolutely fabulous and rather original for the “rhetorical” way he plays the preludes, it’s something he mentions in the booklet but when you hear it in action it has quite an effect. He thinks, basically, that LC’s preludes have nothing to do with lute music and everything to do with Italianate toccatas, apparently it’s an idea he’s filched from Moroney. In practice that means that the music is clearly punctuated into large sections, each of which has its own role to play in the overall oration, making explicit.

Quote
the necessary punctuation marks, not evident in the writing, which, in addition to highlighting a change of character, oblige the player to contrive pauses of varying length in order to clarify the structure of the discourse.

Alessandrini has thought hard about the dances too, about tempo, and he plays them with much more nobility than virtuosity - but it’s thrilling to hear partly because of the sound of his harpsichord ( I have no idea what it is, as far as I can see the booklet neglects to tell us.)  The impression is of something dramatic, operatic,  but seriously so, like Corneille or Racine.

That’s a good way to explain this interpretation in words, it’s the musical equivalent of a French tragedy.

Anyway, whatever, it’s a source of great pleasure
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 05:57:14 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen