Poll

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The blind comparison is dead. Let it rest in peace.
2 (9.1%)
The blind comparison isn't dead, I just don't wanna do any more of them myself, but I'm happy to watch and make fun of you guys for eliminating Knappertsbusch's Ring in Round One
6 (27.3%)
I'm ok with participating in another blind comparison, under the following conditions: _______
10 (45.5%)
I'm already planning to organise another blind comparison!
0 (0%)
I literally don't care. Leave me alone.
4 (18.2%)

Total Members Voted: 22

Author Topic: Future blind comparisons  (Read 2289 times)

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Offline amw

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Future blind comparisons
« on: February 02, 2017, 04:53:51 AM »
With the triumphant [sic] conclusion of the Bach Sonatas & Partitas Comparison, what lies next for GMG's least time-honoured tradition? An ignominious demise, unmourned and unloved? A zombie existence, dead on arrival but somehow still shambling forward, devouring the brains of GMG members? Or perhaps a glorious rebirth with trumpets sounding and whatnot? Share your views.

Offline Brian

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2017, 06:15:00 AM »
I organized a number of them back in the day (Ravel Gaspard and a series of "Lightning Rounds" focusing on shorter pieces like a Chopin etude). I'm simply running low on pieces I could organize a game for, using my collection. But I dearly love the blind listening games! And probably will someday do another Lightning Round or two - say, Chopin Nocturne Op. 48 No. 1, or maybe a short orchestral work like Moldau or an overture.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2017, 06:26:56 AM »
I got the first round pieces from the S&P but they are "too heavy" for me and I did not have enough leisure. Although I really enjoyed the Schubert this took a lot of time and I guess I'd only be able to drag myself to do it if it is a piece that is short and interests me quite a bit.
So, yes, Chopin could be good. Or maybe Beethoven's op.135, I seem to recall amw suggest it some time after the Schubert quintet was finished.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2017, 06:44:09 AM »
IMO blind listening is an interesting excercise, from which one can learn
a lot. The most obvious thing is, that you listen in another way to interpretations, when you are not biased by the knowledge of the players identity. And then some recordings may turn out to be not quite in the way you recalled. It ought to be possible to find music suitable for the purpose, and which may have a general interest to the GMG'ers.
res severa verum gaudium

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2017, 06:45:53 AM »
I just don't wanna do any more of them myself is something of a misstatement, but I think they're a great idea, I enjoy them from the sidelines, but I do not often have the freedom to be fair to participation in them with time/attention.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline amw

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2017, 06:49:42 AM »
I guess for the record, I'd feel qualified to organise a blind comparison on any of the following topics (limiting to pieces that I think would fit the format):

Schumann - Kreisleriana, Carnaval, Davidsbündlertänze, Fantasiestücke, Fantasy in C, etc
Ravel - Piano Trio, Miroirs
Fauré - Piano Trio, Cello Sonata No. 2
Beethoven - any string quartet, piano sonata, violin or cello sonata, piano trio, symphony, or piano concerto within reason (e.g. no Hammerklavier, no Emperor, or anything else that could require 15+ minute excerpts)
Chopin - Sonata No. 3, or "lightning rounds" on any of the Ballades or Scherzi or Nocturnes or the Polonaise-Fantaisie or the Barcarolle
Debussy - Etudes, Violin or Cello Sonatas
Janáček - String Quartet No. 1
Bartók - a string quartet or piano concerto
Prokofiev - any of the "War Sonatas", Violin Concerto 1 or 2
Brahms - any violin sonata, the Horn Trio, the Clarinet Trio, the Op. 118 piano cycle
Schoenberg - Erste Kammersymphonie
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring
Mendelssohn - String Quartet in a Op. 13
Borodin - String Quartet No. 2
« Last Edit: February 02, 2017, 06:52:11 AM by amw »

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2017, 06:51:30 AM »
I'd make time for the Brahms cl trio.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Brian

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2017, 09:52:34 AM »
I'd be down for, at least,

Schumann - Kreisleriana, Fantasiestücke, Fantasy in C
Ravel - Piano Miroirs
Fauré - Piano Trio, Cello Sonata No. 2
Beethoven - any string quartet, piano sonata, violin or cello sonata, piano trio, symphony, or piano concerto within reason (e.g. no Hammerklavier, no Emperor, or anything else that could require 15+ minute excerpts)
Chopin - Sonata No. 3, or "lightning rounds" on any of the Ballades or Scherzi or Nocturnes or the Barcarolle
Janáček - String Quartet No. 1
Borodin - String Quartet No. 2

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2017, 12:45:20 PM »
And I for these:

Beethoven - any string quartet, piano sonata, violin or cello sonata, piano trio, symphony, or piano concerto within reason (e.g. no Hammerklavier, no Emperor, or anything else that could require 15+ minute excerpts)
Chopin - Sonata No. 3, or "lightning rounds" on any of the Ballades or Scherzi or Nocturnes or the Polonaise-Fantaisie or the Barcarolle
Bartók - piano concerto
Brahms -  the Op. 118 piano cycle
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring
res severa verum gaudium

Offline Todd

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2017, 12:50:45 PM »
I generally don't have enough time, and perhaps too short of an attention span, to participate, but the outcomes are nice to see.  I may be able to be of some assistance with respect to recordings of LvB or Mozart piano sonatas if anyone sets up a comparison for any of those.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2017, 01:43:17 PM »
I think I'd be up for these ones:

Schumann - Kreisleriana, Carnaval, Davidsbündlertänze, Fantasiestücke, Fantasy in C, etc
Beethoven - any string quartet, piano sonata
Chopin - Sonata No. 3, or "lightning rounds" on any of the Ballades or Scherzi or Nocturnes or the Polonaise-Fantaisie or the Barcarolle
Debussy - Violin or Cello Sonatas
Janáček - String Quartet No. 1
Bartók - a string quartet [No. 3 perhaps?] or piano concerto [Especially No. 1!]
Brahms - the Clarinet Trio, the Op. 118 piano cycle
Schoenberg - Erste Kammersymphonie [I'll be doing a write-up on the work in a few weeks, so it'll be fresh in my mind]
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2017, 01:56:29 PM »
I participated in, and enjoyed, the blind comparisons of symphonic works (Bruckner 6, Mahler 1, Brahms 2, Zarathustra). I'm less interested, and feel less qualified, in chamber and solo works. So, I'd participate in a comparison of these works from amw's list:

Prokofiev - Violin Concerto 1 or 2
Schoenberg - Erste Kammersymphonie
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring


Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Spineur

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2017, 02:25:31 PM »
I said I dont care.  These blind comparisons take forever to conclude, and I loose interest after a couple of weeks.  Furthermore, if it takes six months or more to come to some sort of conclusion, the outcome is meaningless and of no interest to me.
A woman voice glides like the wind
Of black, of damp, of night
And all it touches in this flight
Suddenly is over.

Anna Akhomatova

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2017, 02:50:39 PM »
I'm in! Wait, there is no response for that! I love them - find them very helpful at refocusing on a piece and enjoy hearing all the different takes.

I'd do pretty much any of them, except for the Rite of Spring. Can't stand the piece. But everything else is pretty much fair game.

Offenbach gets a raw deal in recordings considering his talent! For a discussion of this outstanding composer too little recorded: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,5572.

Online Pat B

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2017, 05:21:58 PM »
IMO blind listening is an interesting excercise, from which one can learn
a lot. The most obvious thing is, that you listen in another way to interpretations, when you are not biased by the knowledge of the players identity. And then some recordings may turn out to be not quite in the way you recalled. It ought to be possible to find music suitable for the purpose, and which may have a general interest to the GMG'ers.

Yes. Participating in the process has been much more valuable than seeing the results.

I was part of the problem in the Bach Violin S&P one but I think I’m up for a new one. I’d probably prefer shorter excerpts and round 2 of S&P showed that we need a deadline.

Offline Cato

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2017, 05:45:46 PM »
I think I'd be up for these ones:

Schumann - Kreisleriana, Carnaval, Davidsbündlertänze, Fantasiestücke, Fantasy in C, etc
Beethoven - any string quartet, piano sonata
Chopin - Sonata No. 3, or "lightning rounds" on any of the Ballades or Scherzi or Nocturnes or the Polonaise-Fantaisie or the Barcarolle
Debussy - Violin or Cello Sonatas
Janáček - String Quartet No. 1
Bartók - a string quartet [No. 3 perhaps?] or piano concerto [Especially No. 1!]
Brahms - the Clarinet Trio, the Op. 118 piano cycle
Schoenberg - Erste Kammersymphonie [I'll be doing a write-up on the work in a few weeks, so it'll be fresh in my mind]
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring


The ones in heavy type are of greater interest, but I will help with anything! 

For the Beethoven idea, how about the Opus 111 for a piano sonata?
"Now who taught ye t' be playin' patty fingers in the holy water?"

- Barry Fitzgerald to John Wayne in  The Quiet Man.

Offline Jeffrey Smith

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2017, 06:55:33 PM »
I just don't wanna do any more of them myself is something of a misstatement, but I think they're a great idea, I enjoy them from the sidelines, but I do not often have the freedom to be fair to participation in them with time/attention.

My problem as well. Beyond that, I found myself loathe to say some recordings were superior to others.  Which resulted for instance in my verdict for the final round of the Bach as all of them being in their different ways equally good.  I hope that did not screw up the scoring too much!

Offline amw

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2017, 12:23:50 AM »
I participated in, and enjoyed, the blind comparisons of symphonic works (Bruckner 6, Mahler 1, Brahms 2, Zarathustra). I'm less interested, and feel less qualified, in chamber and solo works.
FYI I am pretty much the opposite. So if anyone wants to organise a blind comparison of a symphonic work, please do, don't mind me and my pro-chamber bias.

Offline jessop

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2017, 12:24:58 AM »
I would also be very interested in symphonic works as well.......I haven't ever participated in a blind comparison but I think it might be nice to try one.

Offline GioCar

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Re: Future blind comparisons
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2017, 01:13:39 AM »
......I haven't ever participated in a blind comparison but I think it might be nice to try one.
+1, for a short (10-15min max) piece.

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