Author Topic: CD ripping  (Read 3800 times)

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Offline Todd

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CD ripping
« on: April 28, 2017, 07:27:41 AM »
A few months ago I wanted to listen to one of my CDs, but I ran into a problem: I couldn’t find it.  My collection has grown so large and unruly that I have abandoned racks and rely on floor-bound stacks, out of any semblance of order.  While obviously a problem born of self-indulgence and affluenza, I decided it was time to fix the problem.  I decided to rip a major portion of my collection to allow for immediate access to whatever I may want to hear, and since Amazon offers unlimited online storage for $60/year, equal to Backblaze but with a helpful UI, I figured now was a good time to rip away and store off-site for personal disaster recovery purposes.  (When the Cascadia Subduction Zone quake hits, if it is at the high end of projections, my home stands a greater than 50% chance of being leveled, and if I survive the quake, I will want access to some form of entertainment at some point.)

I've used EAC to occasionally rip discs since the turn of the century, and it is reliable with superb error correction.  But it can be slow, and it is not really optimized for retrieving metadata.  This is especially true with Asian market releases, of which I have not a few.  Fortunately, Windows Media Player also rips nicely, and it's metadata retrieval and tagging is better, and it actually retrieves Japanese market metadata for almost every title I ripped.  I started off ripping my LvB sonata cycle collection, which took a while, before switching to artist-based big boxes, which is now mostly done, which means that I have started in on the rest of my collection proper.  Along the way, I had to swap out drives to a nice enough Asus 48x spinner.  But what really ended up being helpful was switching to dBpoweramp for ripping.  It's metadata system is much better than EAC or Media Player, and it's much better than going back and using foobar to tag after the fact.  I'm not a big fan of MediaMonkey's interface, finding dBpoweramp easier and quicker to use.  The cover image search and upload functions are simple and quick, whether at initial rip or after the fact, and the often times multiple metadata sets for tracks that are offered up for each disc make choosing the right one easy.  Of course, the “catch” is that the software is not free, but at $50-ish for two licenses, and about $5/year going forward, it's not spendy, either. 

Now it's my go-to, though on discs that have errors (ie, discs available in AccurateRip where ultra-secure ripping kicks in), I switch to EAC to rip affected tracks as it works faster in every case.  More than half the time when ultra-secure kicks in, the program ends up re-ripping by frame, and that just takes too long.

When I started ripping, I did some A/Bs between WAV and FLAC, and sure enough, they sound the same, so I went with FLAC for almost all ripping.  I also compared encoding levels, and ended up sticking with level 5 for a size/decoding sweet-spot.  I use Oppos as transports, and the 10x and forward players have gapless playback as a standard function, so now I just plug in an external hard drive loaded with music and go.  It's immense fun to be able to sift through titles and do A/Bs on a whim.  I'm closing in on three thousand ripped discs, and have about another three thousand or so to go before I'm done.  I do not plan on ripping my opera collection since I don't listen to a lot of opera these days, and if/when I return to listening to more of it, I won't be doing any A/B listening, or skipping around from one act in Opera X to another act in Opera Y.  I've also regained some floor and storage space in my listening room.  Once the discs are ripped, I box them up and store them in the garage.  Easier access and more space, what's not to like?

Well, I found one thing that might qualify.  On some piano recordings, I've noticed that non-musical sound is now more audible.  (Sounds include chair and piano creaks, damper mechanism noise, and the like.)   The sounds are still largely there when listening to CD, they are just lower in level, though some sounds are absent.  At first, I thought there was an issue with the rips, so I re-ripped as WAV and FLAC, and re-listened on two different systems.  I also relied on my son's more youthful ears to verify if he heard anything.  The results were the same.  The differences have been most pronounced on Denon CDs, namely Michel Dalberto's Schubert, which I can live with, and Michel Beroff's Debussy, which is more of an issue.  The only thing I can think of that might be causing this is that the record companies consciously rely on CD player error correction to filter out certain sounds, just as they introduced noise as one form of copy control with the express intention of relying on error correction to filter it out.  Of course, I can always just rely on CDs in any cases where this becomes an issue.  And something else might be causing the issue.

I've also learned, over and over again, that not all CD pressings are the same.  Older Telarc pressings seem to be spot-on in every case when it comes to metadata and error correction, followed by Japanese market pressings (and the Japanese are, hands down, the most thorough when it comes to labeling each and every track meticulously), followed by French pressings, and then it varies.  The worst ripping experience I had was with Stewart Goodyear's Beethoven cycle.  I had to use EAC, and the rip speeds dropped well below 1x speed with continuous error correction.  I've not listened to the whole cycle in ripped form yet, but the couple sonatas I have listened to all sound fine.  And I've also ran into copy controlled discs, all of them from Teldec/Erato so far.  Fortunately, none of the titles are oft-listened to, and one (Lubimov's Mozart) may never be listened to again, so it's not a big issue yet. 

Modern technology is fun.
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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2017, 10:07:24 AM »
Welcome to the club. I've been doing that since 1999, first with MusicMatch Jukebox and MP3's at 320bps, by 2008, with dBPoweramp and FLAC. I have 4 TB of external storage which allows me to backup my backup. I also use EAC for the toughies.

If you are bugged by that noise, Audacity will remove it although I am not into it enough to tell you how. I use it to cut off the applause at the end of 'live' recordings, or if I am bugged enough to bother, I can look at the waveform and find the offending pop or click and simply excise it. I haven't registered it since I don't use it enough, but I am very fond of it when I need it.

Oddly, I have 2 editions of the Lubimov Mozart, 1 from the singles and the other from the box set, and had no copying issues with either of them. Hmmm... :-\

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 10:23:26 AM »
A few months ago I wanted to listen to one of my CDs, but I ran into a problem: I couldn’t find it.  My collection has grown so large and unruly that I have abandoned racks and rely on floor-bound stacks, out of any semblance of order.  While obviously a problem born of self-indulgence and affluenza, I decided it was time to fix the problem.  I decided to rip a major portion of my collection to allow for immediate access to whatever I may want to hear, and since Amazon offers unlimited online storage for $60/year, equal to Backblaze but with a helpful UI, I figured now was a good time to rip away and store off-site for personal disaster recovery purposes.  (When the Cascadia Subduction Zone quake hits, if it is at the high end of projections, my home stands a greater than 50% chance of being leveled, and if I survive the quake, I will want access to some form of entertainment at some point.)

I've used EAC to occasionally rip discs since the turn of the century, and it is reliable with superb error correction.  But it can be slow, and it is not really optimized for retrieving metadata.  This is especially true with Asian market releases, of which I have not a few.  Fortunately, Windows Media Player also rips nicely, and it's metadata retrieval and tagging is better, and it actually retrieves Japanese market metadata for almost every title I ripped.  I started off ripping my LvB sonata cycle collection, which took a while, before switching to artist-based big boxes, which is now mostly done, which means that I have started in on the rest of my collection proper.  Along the way, I had to swap out drives to a nice enough Asus 48x spinner.  But what really ended up being helpful was switching to dBpoweramp for ripping.  It's metadata system is much better than EAC or Media Player, and it's much better than going back and using foobar to tag after the fact.  I'm not a big fan of MediaMonkey's interface, finding dBpoweramp easier and quicker to use.  The cover image search and upload functions are simple and quick, whether at initial rip or after the fact, and the often times multiple metadata sets for tracks that are offered up for each disc make choosing the right one easy.  Of course, the “catch” is that the software is not free, but at $50-ish for two licenses, and about $5/year going forward, it's not spendy, either. 

Now it's my go-to, though on discs that have errors (ie, discs available in AccurateRip where ultra-secure ripping kicks in), I switch to EAC to rip affected tracks as it works faster in every case.  More than half the time when ultra-secure kicks in, the program ends up re-ripping by frame, and that just takes too long.

When I started ripping, I did some A/Bs between WAV and FLAC, and sure enough, they sound the same, so I went with FLAC for almost all ripping.  I also compared encoding levels, and ended up sticking with level 5 for a size/decoding sweet-spot.  I use Oppos as transports, and the 10x and forward players have gapless playback as a standard function, so now I just plug in an external hard drive loaded with music and go.  It's immense fun to be able to sift through titles and do A/Bs on a whim.  I'm closing in on three thousand ripped discs, and have about another three thousand or so to go before I'm done.  I do not plan on ripping my opera collection since I don't listen to a lot of opera these days, and if/when I return to listening to more of it, I won't be doing any A/B listening, or skipping around from one act in Opera X to another act in Opera Y.  I've also regained some floor and storage space in my listening room.  Once the discs are ripped, I box them up and store them in the garage.  Easier access and more space, what's not to like?

Well, I found one thing that might qualify.  On some piano recordings, I've noticed that non-musical sound is now more audible.  (Sounds include chair and piano creaks, damper mechanism noise, and the like.)   The sounds are still largely there when listening to CD, they are just lower in level, though some sounds are absent.  At first, I thought there was an issue with the rips, so I re-ripped as WAV and FLAC, and re-listened on two different systems.  I also relied on my son's more youthful ears to verify if he heard anything.  The results were the same.  The differences have been most pronounced on Denon CDs, namely Michel Dalberto's Schubert, which I can live with, and Michel Beroff's Debussy, which is more of an issue.  The only thing I can think of that might be causing this is that the record companies consciously rely on CD player error correction to filter out certain sounds, just as they introduced noise as one form of copy control with the express intention of relying on error correction to filter it out.  Of course, I can always just rely on CDs in any cases where this becomes an issue.  And something else might be causing the issue.

I've also learned, over and over again, that not all CD pressings are the same.  Older Telarc pressings seem to be spot-on in every case when it comes to metadata and error correction, followed by Japanese market pressings (and the Japanese are, hands down, the most thorough when it comes to labeling each and every track meticulously), followed by French pressings, and then it varies.  The worst ripping experience I had was with Stewart Goodyear's Beethoven cycle.  I had to use EAC, and the rip speeds dropped well below 1x speed with continuous error correction.  I've not listened to the whole cycle in ripped form yet, but the couple sonatas I have listened to all sound fine.  And I've also ran into copy controlled discs, all of them from Teldec/Erato so far.  Fortunately, none of the titles are oft-listened to, and one (Lubimov's Mozart) may never be listened to again, so it's not a big issue yet. 

Modern technology is fun.

Will the amazon storage allow you to store your flac files? What exactly is this oppo thingie? Is it just a CD transport for ripping?  Does it get the ripped music into your hifi? If not how do you manage that?
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 10:26:08 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2017, 10:39:11 AM »
Oddly, I have 2 editions of the Lubimov Mozart, 1 from the singles and the other from the box set, and had no copying issues with either of them.


I have the stand-alone box-set reissue.  The other two copy protected titles I have run into are Harnoncourt's second St Matthew Passion and Plasson's Durufle Requiem, so not exactly oft-spun classics.  Fortunately, the Lili Kraus big box, also from Erato, ripped just fine. 

I currently have three 3 TB drives, so I have two on-site backups plus Amazon.  Since I also back up digital photos on two of the drives, which now take up about 70 MB each since I shoot both raw and JPEG, I'm probably going to either split the photos and ripped files onto different drives, or buy a couple 8 or 16 TB RAID external drives and be done with it.  Oppo updated its firmware within the last couple years to handle external drives up to 16 TB, so I'd be set.  (The units can accept up to three connected drives at once.)  Data storage is not really an issue now, though I still like FLACs since I can copy them to a phone or thumbdrive for use on other equipment.

If the noise becomes an issue, I can always opt for the zero dollar fix and spin the CDs, or I can prep myself mentally like I do when I listen to fortepianos.  This is the very definition of a first world (non-) problem, so unless a lot of discs display this issue, I won't really worry.  Most of my other must-have piano discs I have listened to have been just fine.



Will the amazon storage allow you to store your flac files? What exactly is this oppo thing? Does it get the ripped music into your hifi?


Yes, Amazon allows you to store any type of file, but as of right now, it is storage only; you cannot stream the files.  That written, Amazon will begin beta testing a new feature for that soon.  My son will be beta testing it, so I should know how well it works soon enough, though given the metadata issue with classical titles, it may not be optimized for that music.

Oppo is a high(ish) end brand of optical disc spinner.  (They also make a DAC, headphones, and primarily for the Asian market, smartphones.)  Their disc playback units play pretty much all optical discs, and you can plug in an external drive via USB 2.0 (front) or 3.0 (back) and use either its monitor based menu or its phone/tablet app menu to navigate folders and files.  You can also connect the units to an Ethernet network, though gapless playback is limited.  I go the external harddrive route.  It serves as a digital hub, which I route to my DAC, which then runs into my core electronics.  Oppo's base units - now the UDP-203 - are low cost enough (about $550) so that I buy the latest model every 2-3 years to stay up with what's out there.  The more expensive unit has better visual playback, but I'm mostly interested in the transport and content control.  Both units use the same transport.  Oppo's transports are good enough so that MSB uses one in their $5K+ transport.  Years ago, Lexicon dropped a BDP-83 in a new case and charged an additional three grand for it.


Current entry-level unit:

« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 10:48:38 AM by Todd »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2017, 10:57:11 AM »

I have the stand-alone box-set reissue.  The other two copy protected titles I have run into are Harnoncourt's second St Matthew Passion and Plasson's Durufle Requiem, so not exactly oft-spun classics.  Fortunately, the Lili Kraus big box, also from Erato, ripped just fine. 

I currently have three 3 TB drives, so I have two on-site backups plus Amazon.  Since I also back up digital photos on two of the drives, which now take up about 70 MB each since I shoot both raw and JPEG, I'm probably going to either split the photos and ripped files onto different drives, or buy a couple 8 or 16 TB RAID external drives and be done with it.  Oppo updated its firmware within the last couple years to handle external drives up to 16 TB, so I'd be set.  (The units can accept up to three connected drives at once.)  Data storage is not really an issue now, though I still like FLACs since I can copy them to a phone or thumbdrive for use on other equipment.

If the noise becomes an issue, I can always opt for the zero dollar fix and spin the CDs, or I can prep myself mentally like I do when I listen to fortepianos.  This is the very definition of a first world (non-) problem, so unless a lot of discs display this issue, I won't really worry.  Most of my other must-have piano discs I have listened to have been just fine.




Yes, Amazon allows you to store any type of file, but as of right now, it is storage only; you cannot stream the files.  That written, Amazon will begin beta testing a new feature for that soon.  My son will be beta testing it, so I should know how well it works soon enough, though given the metadata issue with classical titles, it may not be optimized for that music.

Oppo is a high(ish) end brand of optical disc spinner.  (They also make a DAC, headphones, and primarily for the Asian market, smartphones.)  Their disc playback units play pretty much all optical discs, and you can plug in an external drive via USB 2.0 (front) or 3.0 (back) and use either its monitor based menu or its phone/tablet app menu to navigate folders and files.  You can also connect the units to an Ethernet network, though gapless playback is limited.  I go the external harddrive route.  It serves as a digital hub, which I route to my DAC, which then runs into my core electronics.  Oppo's base units - now the UDP-203 - are low cost enough (about $550) so that I buy the latest model every 2-3 years to stay up with what's out there.  The more expensive unit has better visual playback, but I'm mostly interested in the transport and content control.  Both units use the same transport.  Oppo's transports are good enough so that MSB uses one in their $5K+ transport.  Years ago, Lexicon dropped a BDP-83 in a new case and charged an additional three grand for it.


Current entry-level unit:



(Sorry if this sounds like the Spanish inquisition!)

How do you search the files on the hard drive? By filename or by tag -- if by tags, how? If by filename, is it satisfactory?

I'll explore the amazon file storage some time soon.

« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 10:59:42 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2017, 11:00:38 AM »
How do you search the file on the hard drive? By filename or by tag -- if by tags, how? If by filename, is it satisfactory?


I created the file structure in Windows and browse it using either the monitor based menu and remote or app based remote.  The file structure is precisely the way I like to organize my files: by artist>disc for compilation box-sets, or by composer>genre>artist(s)>disc for everything else.  For pop/rock and jazz, it's artist>disc.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2017, 11:07:58 AM »

I created the file structure in Windows and browse it using either the monitor based menu and remote or app based remote.  The file structure is precisely the way I like to organize my files: by artist>disc for compilation box-sets, or by composer>genre>artist(s)>disc for everything else.  For pop/rock and jazz, it's artist>disc.

And when you rip you can set up dbpoweramp to put it in the right place I suppose, using online metadata to generate the final bit of the path. Do you then find and play a file via a tablet while sitting in your armchair? Or do you have to go to your computer?

(The reason I'm so interested is that I may explore a route along these lines myself. Right now I use Logitech Squeezebox, which is excellent, but the interface to spotify is not really maintained and is unreliable. I'm looking for viable alternatives to the Logitech Media Server and a Squeezebox for playing a very large library of lossless files.)

« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 11:13:25 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2017, 11:17:31 AM »
When I first started ripping CDs to FLAC, I used WinAmp and continued to do so for many years. I completed about half of my CD collection--600 of about 1200. Then WinAmp went TangoUniform, and I just lost interest for a few years. Then I started looking for something else. Media Monkey was recommended, but I found it an unmitigated disaster for ripping, especially for discs I made myself from my LPs (Pioneer CD Recorder connected to my main system) and other discs in which I had to enter the track names manually.

After the Media Monkey fiasco, I tried Foobar 2000, and it works like a dream. I think it is just about  the best piece of software I have ever used, and is equally adept at ripping and organizing a collection. I never use tags, and browse exclusively by folder. In my system 1 folder =  1 CD. This is not a perfect system, but I rarely have trouble finding things from my collection of over 1200 CD recordings. I have an LP collection of about the same size and in the process of digitizing it.

In 2015, I bought a Fiio X1 DAP with at 128 gigitty-giggity byte card and now have 300+ CDs worth of music in the palm of my hand. I still have room for about another hundred. I had an iPod Touch for many years, but I must say the Fiio would nuke the iPod in terms of sound quality, and I greatly appreciate the ability to browse by folder and to have the heirarchy of folders match the one on my HD. I am still amazed that I have this much music in such a small package, when ten years ago I had to figure out which 20 or so CDs I was going to bring with me on vacation or a business trip.

The Pioneer has since also gone TangoUniform, and I bought an ADC to rip my LPs directly to FLAC using Audacity. Given that I have another 1200 LPs to digitize, it will save me a lot of space (no longer making CDs). Of course Audacity gives me the option to do editing, higher sampling rates, etc. that I never had with the CD Recorder.

Indeed, technology is fun--can't wait for self-driving cars to save us the horror of commuting.



 

« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 11:24:07 AM by XB-70 Valkyrie »
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2017, 11:17:48 AM »
And when you rip you can set up dbpoweramp to put it in the right place I suppose, using online metadata to generate the final bit of the path. Do you then find and play a file via a tablet while sitting at your armchair?


dBpoweramp rips to a default path, though the path can be changed as needed per disc.  You can use the metadata it retrieves, if you want, to name the destination folder.  It uses six metadata providers by default, and you can change between them to get the right degree of detail, or manually enter the info if you want. 

I rip to my C drive, then after ripping I move folders to two external drives "manually" (ie, cut and paste to one, then copy and paste to the other).  I may write a script to do it at some point, but I usually wait until I'm done for the day before moving folders and files all at once.  I then copy folders and files to the drive I use in my stereo about once a week.
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2017, 11:23:04 AM »
In my system 1 folder =  1 CD.


That's generally how I do it, though for cases where works are split between two discs (eg, a long Mahler or Bruckner symphony), I take the opportunity to merge them into one folder so I can listen continuously.
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2017, 11:42:52 AM »
(The reason I'm so interested is that I may explore a route along these lines myself. Right now I use Logitech Squeezebox, which is excellent, but the interface to spotify is not really maintained and is unreliable. I'm looking for viable alternatives to the Logitech Media Server and a Squeezebox for playing a very large library of lossless files.)


I'm glad Oppo does want I want, because I don't really have to spend a lot of money to get what I need.  I've looked at various options for streamers (I'm very happy with my DAC and don't need or want a new one), and they are pricey for what is on offer.  I have entertained the idea of getting a Salk StreamPlayer Gen III, but it's too much for me to bite, even though it supports Tidal.  (I'd have to use Roon to use Tidal, so for now, it's a no-go.)  I only use Amazon and YouTube for streaming, and I can run those using my tablet and an Audioengine B1, though that uses Bluetooth, so sound quality is compromised, but everything other than Tidal is anyway when it comes to streaming.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2017, 12:18:14 PM »

I'm glad Oppo does want I want, because I don't really have to spend a lot of money to get what I need.  I've looked at various options for streamers (I'm very happy with my DAC and don't need or want a new one), and they are pricey for what is on offer.  I have entertained the idea of getting a Salk StreamPlayer Gen III, but it's too much for me to bite, even though it supports Tidal.  (I'd have to use Roon to use Tidal, so for now, it's a no-go.)  I only use Amazon and YouTube for streaming, and I can run those using my tablet and an Audioengine B1, though that uses Bluetooth, so sound quality is compromised, but everything other than Tidal is anyway when it comes to streaming.

I'm still not clear about how you're searching and playing.

Look as I type this I'm on my armchair using an iPad. I can open up an app on the iPad and search my  music files by tags or indeed search Spotify and Qobuz, and I can then choose and play through my hi fi. The files are on a hard drive in another room, connected to a desktop, which is in turn connected wirelessly to the squeezebox, which connects to a DAC.

Can you do that?

Oh, one thing to think about is a chromecast audio, using LMS. But there may be problems about gapless, I'm not sure.

Another is to build your own streamer using Raspberry Pi.  It's not at all hard.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 12:20:03 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2017, 12:22:23 PM »
Can you do that?


With the hard-drive or CD contents, yes.  For online stuff, I have to get up, walk over to my stereo, push one button (my DAC has no remote control), then I can use my tablet to search online content.  I rarely use online content for classical listening.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2017, 12:40:38 PM »

With the hard-drive or CD contents, yes. 

That's really good though. Good find. I guess your hard drive is physically linked to the hi fi amp via the DAC, and there's some tablet app for finding a file and playing it with foobar or windows media player.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 12:49:47 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2017, 02:31:04 PM »
I guess your hard drive is physically linked to the hi fi amp via the DAC, and there's some tablet app for finding a file and playing it with foobar or windows media player.


No, the hard-drive is connected to the Oppo, which feeds the DAC.  Oppo software accesses the hard drive and outputs the music.  I choose to use an outboard DAC because it is better, but the Oppo internal DAC could also be used.
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Offline Holden

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2017, 03:22:25 PM »
This conversation holds a lot of interest for me. A few years ago I began the arduous journey of ripping my entire collection to an external HD. I didn't do my research and started out with too low a bit rate on many of the rips. I also played with various rippers starting with Audacity and then moving to the now defunct Winamp. The beauty of Winamp for me was it's ability to access the Gracenote database. There were very few recordings it couldn't find though compilation CDs sent by friends were a problem.

What I have now is about 90% of my CDs ripped in a variety of formats and bitrates - in other words, a dogs breakfast. Taking my HD from my PC and connecting it to my Mac has shown up a number of issues so I have decided to start again.

So, is dBpoweramp the best ripper?

Will it find the disc contents, composer/genre/artist/track list/etc like Winamp did?

Will it work on an iMac?

I have an analog stereo amplifier so can I assume that the Oppo won't work for me as a ripping source?

Finally, I have three format choices. As I have a Mac, then ALAC is an option. The other two are FLAC and 320kbps MP3. I find it very hard to distinguish between FLAC and high end MP3.

I'll start the project with my Rubinstein big box edition. That's over 140 CDs so it will take a while. Then I'll do the other box sets I've got (Cziffra, Gilels, Haskill, Lupu, blah blah blah). Then I'll go the single CDs alphabetically by composer.
Cheers

Holden

Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2017, 03:37:25 PM »
So, is dBpoweramp the best ripper?

I'm not sure I can say it is the best, but it is excellent, is better than freeware, and I use it first now.  I use EAC as a backup for tracks/discs with rip issues.  I recommend having EAC as a backup.


Will it find the disc contents, composer/genre/artist/track list/etc like Winamp did?

In most cases, yes.  One cool feature is that if you cannot find a CD cover image you like, you can image your own and tag the files when ripping or after.  For brand new discs, or very obscure ones, metadata may not be available and you would have to enter track info yourself.  I have had to do this a few times.


Will it work on an iMac?

Don't know.


I have an analog stereo amplifier so can I assume that the Oppo won't work for me as a ripping source?

Oppo is basically a high end CD/BD player.  I do my ripping on a regular PC.


Finally, I have three format choices. As I have a Mac, then ALAC is an option. The other two are FLAC and 320kbps MP3. I find it very hard to distinguish between FLAC and high end MP3.

ALAC and FLAC are lossless and sound indistinguishable from WAV files.  I use FLAC.  320 MP3 is audibly inferior through my main rig and home theater, so I always go FLAC.  dBpoweramp rips as FLAC but has a batch conversion tool to convert to other formats.  Even for MP3, which I need since my car's USB reader doesn't handle FLACs, I rip as FLAC and then convert afterward.


I'll start the project with my Rubinstein big box edition. That's over 140 CDs so it will take a while.

I've done most of my artist collections, and have Katchen, Richter (three boxes), Giulini, and Rubinstein left.  I started the Rubinstein a couple days ago and have done a couple rip sessions.  Some of the discs rip very quickly given the short timings.  I'm most excited about being able to jump around that behemoth box, comparing Mazurkas, and so on.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Mandryka

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2017, 08:45:11 PM »

No, the hard-drive is connected to the Oppo, which feeds the DAC.  Oppo software accesses the hard drive and outputs the music.  I choose to use an outboard DAC because it is better, but the Oppo internal DAC could also be used.

Now I understand.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Holden

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #18 on: April 29, 2017, 01:25:32 AM »
Thanks for answering my questions Todd. I downloaded dBPoweramp onto my Mac as a test and am very impressed with what it does. I ripped the first three sets from the Rubinstein box (14 CDs) to my Verbatim HD and was surprised how quickly it ripped the FLAC. The metadata is variable - on some CDs it lists composer, work, etc but on others it just gives the tempo and maybe an opus number. I think I can go back in and edit if I want to. I'll buy a new HD and start from scratch after transferring the 14 CDs I've already done.
Cheers

Holden

Offline Todd

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Re: CD ripping
« Reply #19 on: April 29, 2017, 05:05:46 AM »
Thanks for answering my questions Todd. I downloaded dBPoweramp onto my Mac as a test and am very impressed with what it does. I ripped the first three sets from the Rubinstein box (14 CDs) to my Verbatim HD and was surprised how quickly it ripped the FLAC. The metadata is variable - on some CDs it lists composer, work, etc but on others it just gives the tempo and maybe an opus number. I think I can go back in and edit if I want to. I'll buy a new HD and start from scratch after transferring the 14 CDs I've already done.


The metadata on the LP length discs is more consistent.  Make sure to select the 'Review Metadata' button (or press Alt+M) to review options with each disc.  Some options may be more to your liking.

Also, I suggest going to CD Ripper Options and selecting Secure rather than Burst for ripping.  Burst is default.  I've enabled Ultra Secure which only activates in the event of a rip error, which is how I identify which discs or tracks to rip using EAC.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 05:35:22 AM by Todd »
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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