Author Topic: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased  (Read 1572 times)

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Turner

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2018, 12:41:18 AM »
Congratilations - I got curious and checked that Leger book further
https://www.abebooks.it/ricerca-libro/autore/leger-fernand-le-noci-guido/


Online ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2018, 12:48:25 AM »
Congratilations - I got curious and checked that Leger book further
https://www.abebooks.it/ricerca-libro/autore/leger-fernand-le-noci-guido/
Thanks, Turner!  Yes, I immediately turned to abebooks  (and it's Spanish franchise iberlibros--these sites are a treasure trove for anyone looking for OOP books), but in this instance the Amazon MP seller was offering their copy at a fraction of the price quoted on abebooks.   :)
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Offline NikF

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2018, 02:03:13 AM »
At the bookshop of the Bozar in Brussels, after visiting the wonderful Fernand Léger exhibition (as reported here), I noticed a lavishly produced, slightly damaged and outrageously expensive book on the painter being sold. It was published in 1971 by the Galleria Apollinare in Milan, and edited by that gallery's owner Guido Le Noci. The blurb on the book (from the Musée d'Art Moderne de Lille-Métropole) is this:

"Ouvrage entièrement illustre comprenant 34 photographies documentaires, 61 photographies de Leger ou de ses amis, 68 planches en noir ou en couleurs, 55 facsimiles, etc. "La monographie sur Fernand Léger 'Sa vie, son oeuvre, son rêve' retrace d'une façon peu banale la vie du peintre. Le livre releve a la fois de l'album de photographies reproduisant les lieux de son enfance, de la compilation critique réunissant les fac-similes des articles sur Léger, passant par son atelier en montrant des documents alors inédits sur sa façon de concevoir l'enseignement"

The book had a limited edition of 1.150 numbered copies, and it turns out that an Amazon MP seller was offering one (allegedly new)  for the price of any modern paperback. I have just received confirmation that my order has shipped!  :)



To savour!
Enjoy it at your leisure.  :)
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Offline Christo

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2018, 11:08:09 AM »
Christo, that's been a few weeks now since you purchased the piece. You hung it? How is it to live with it?
Well, it looks fine in the (classic) room where it was (meant to be) hung. Its 'Contemporary Realism', referring to Dutch 17th Century paintings, is better known from Henk Helmantel.
E.g.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2018, 12:23:55 PM by Christo »
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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2018, 05:42:22 AM »
Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:



Ángeles (1895-1984) is considered a member of the Spanish “School of Paris”, a group of painters that settled (temporarily or permanently) in the French capital in the wake of Picasso, and which included names such as Óscar Domínguez, Francisco Bores and Ismael González de la Serna, among many others. While in Paris in the 1920s, Ángeles designed the sets for the first performances of Falla’s Master Peter’s Puppet Show, Poulenc’s Aubade, and (posthumously) Satie’s Geneviève de Brabant.

Although originally from Jaén in Andalusia, he grew up in Granada, and returned often to that city from exile after 1958. The Albaicín, the old neighbourhood on a hill across from the Alhambra, was a constant theme of his work in his later years, and the print I bought is one of those “albaicines”.  Another version (oil on canvas) is in the collection of the Reina Sofía Museum:

« Last Edit: August 10, 2018, 05:51:41 AM by ritter »
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Offline NikF

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2018, 11:46:35 PM »
Hey ritter - that's an interesting post. And as a bonus, it's another artist a (quite a while back you spoke of Fernand Leger - and I found his work to be so free, almost boldly liberated. Wonderful!) for me to check out.
Anyway, hope the print turns out to be as good and cool to view and live with as you could hope for. 8)
"You overestimate my power of attraction," he told her. "No, I don't," she replied sharply, "and neither do you".

Online ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2018, 04:51:34 AM »
Some surrealism entering ritter’s flat  :):



André Masson is a painter I have long admired (I first became aware of him in my early childhood thanks to an article in an issue of the Connaissance des Arts magazine my parents had). This etching is a very late work (it’s from 1985, and he died aged 91 in 1987), and the series of 100 copies was produced for leading Berlin gallery Busburg. At this point in his career, he had stopped painting and continued only drawing. His pre-war and American work (he spent the WW2 years in the US) is the most critically acclaimed, and to a degree, his work in exile paved the way for the style of Jackson Pollock and tha abstract expressionists. After his return to France, he mellowed and became “officialised”, with public commissions—the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris—and retrospective exhibitions in e.g. MoMA and the Grand Palais. I find this print (titled “Lansquenet et courtisane”) rather attractive, slightly Picassian in its execution, but also harking in some respects back to Masson’s surrealist style (the image is from the web, and my copy has a different number).

Several Masson canvases hang on the walls of the second floor of the Museo Reina Sofía here in Madrid (one could argue he’s actually overrepresented, given the museum’s focus on Spanish art from 1900-1945). He was the father of conductor Diego Masson (who recorded Pierre Boulez’s Domaines for Harmonía Mundi many years ago, and whom I saw conduct an all-Elliott Carter program—which included the Symphonia: sum fluxae pretium spei—some ten years ago). Masson père also designed the cover for the first recording of Le marteau sans maître from the Domaine Musical on the Véga label.

Also, I got hold—at a very reasonable price—of the lavish facsimile reprint (in 3 volumes) made by Albert Skira in 1981 of all the numbers—1933 to 1939–of the Minotaure magazine:




The covers of the individual issues were by Picasso, Derain, Borès, Miró, Masson (the last number) and others, and the magazine was the mouthpiece of the surrealist movement in those years (André Breton was one of the co-editors).  I’m expecting confirmation it’s been dispatched (my order of the Léger book I mentioned some months ago was never fulfilled, despite the seller confirming not once but twice that he had sent it—obviously, he didn’t have it in stock, and was ashamed to admit it>:(—but of course I got a full refund).
« Last Edit: September 24, 2018, 06:29:35 AM by ritter »
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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2018, 08:31:38 AM »
Purchased a copy of the original release in 1956 (i.e. posthumous) of this poster (65 x 49 cm.) by Raoul Dufy, printed by Mourlot:



This attracted me for several reasons. Firstly, it’s very typical of Dufy (a painter I greatly admire despite his reputation for shallowness and facility); there’s the trademark baroque drawing, and use of contrasting colours in patches (the latter only for the “tragic” characters on the left, while the “comic” group on the right is only in b&w).

Secondly, there’s the historical context. From what I have read, the drawing & gouache was made by Dufy in the early 50s for the Renaud-Barrault Theatre Company, intended for a poster that never materialised (to be used in a tour to the US). After the painter’s death, the poster finally was printed—500 copies—to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the foundation of the company, and used in a tour to South America in 1956 (during which the company’s music director, Pierre Boulez, conducted a symphony orchestra for the first time in his life in my old hometown of Caracas).

There’s a copy of this same poster inscribed by Jean-Louis Barrault to the Alliance Française in Bogotá (now in the archives of the French Ministry of a foreign Affairs).  A variation was used for the company’s visit to the Baalbeck Festival in 1957, and finally the poster was reproduced (in a reduced format) in 1959 in the book Art in Posters, which deals with Mourlot’s collaboration with painters such as Picasso, Braque, Miró and many more.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2018, 10:14:57 AM by ritter »
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Offline 2dogs

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2018, 09:24:32 PM »
I've just bought these two decks of large cards to use in the same way as the publishers other decks on the Solar System, the Elements and the American Museum of Natural History - to read on a Tarot forum instead of actual Tarot cards. The other decks work surpisingly well and there's the added interest of learning more about the various subjects while doing it 8).

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2018, 04:51:37 AM »
Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:


Ángeles (1895-1984) is considered a member of the Spanish “School of Paris”, a group of painters that settled (temporarily or permanently) in the French capital in the wake of Picasso, and which included names such as Óscar Domínguez, Francisco Bores and Ismael González de la Serna, among many others. While in Paris in the 1920s, Ángeles designed the sets for the first performances of Falla’s Master Peter’s Puppet Show, Poulenc’s Aubade, and (posthumously) Satie’s Geneviève de Brabant.

Although originally from Jaén in Andalusia, he grew up in Granada, and returned often to that city from exile after 1958. The Albaicín, the old neighbourhood on a hill across from the Alhambra, was a constant theme of his work in his later years, and the print I bought is one of those “albaicines”.  Another version (oil on canvas) is in the collection of the Reina Sofía Museum:

Some surrealism entering ritter’s flat  :):

André Masson is a painter I have long admired (I first became aware of him in my early childhood thanks to an article in an issue of the Connaissance des Arts magazine my parents had). This etching is a very late work (it’s from 1985, and he died aged 91 in 1987), and the series of 100 copies was produced for leading Berlin gallery Busburg. At this point in his career, he had stopped painting and continued only drawing. His pre-war and American work (he spent the WW2 years in the US) is the most critically acclaimed, and to a degree, his work in exile paved the way for the style of Jackson Pollock and tha abstract expressionists. After his return to France, he mellowed and became “officialised”, with public commissions—the ceiling of the Théâtre de l’Odéon in Paris—and retrospective exhibitions in e.g. MoMA and the Grand Palais. I find this print (titled “Lansquenet et courtisane”) rather attractive, slightly Picassian in its execution, but also harking in some respects back to Masson’s surrealist style (the image is from the web, and my copy has a different number).

Several Masson canvases hang on the walls of the second floor of the Museo Reina Sofía here in Madrid (one could argue he’s actually overrepresented, given the museum’s focus on Spanish art from 1900-1945). He was the father of conductor Diego Masson (who recorded Pierre Boulez’s Domaines for Harmonía Mundi many years ago, and whom I saw conduct an all-Elliott Carter program—which included the Symphonia: sum fluxae pretium spei—some ten years ago). Masson père also designed the cover for the first recording of Le marteau sans maître from the Domaine Musical on the Véga label.

Also, I got hold—at a very reasonable price—of the lavish facsimile reprint (in 3 volumes) made by Albert Skira in 1981 of all the numbers—1933 to 1939–of the Minotaure magazine:

The covers of the individual issues were by Picasso, Derain, Borès, Miró, Masson (the last number) and others, and the magazine was the mouthpiece of the surrealist movement in those years (André Breton was one of the co-editors).  I’m expecting confirmation it’s been dispatched (my order of the Léger book I mentioned some months ago was never fulfilled, despite the seller confirming not once but twice that he had sent it—obviously, he didn’t have it in stock, and was ashamed to admit it>:(—but of course I got a full refund).

Very cool, Rafael! (well, apart from the Léger book)
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Offline JBS

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2018, 08:57:02 AM »
I've just bought these two decks of large cards to use in the same way as the publishers other decks on the Solar System, the Elements and the American Museum of Natural History - to read on a Tarot forum instead of actual Tarot cards. The other decks work surpisingly well and there's the added interest of learning more about the various subjects while doing it 8).

I have the books on which those are based.  Supposedly every artwork in the collections of each museum, although some in such reduced image size their entry is not very useful.  There is also a third one devoted to the museums and major sites in Florence, although it doesn't pretend to be complete.  One thing is certain: they are among the heaviest books in my collection.

Offline 2dogs

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2018, 08:52:08 PM »
I have the books on which those are based.  Supposedly every artwork in the collections of each museum, although some in such reduced image size their entry is not very useful.  There is also a third one devoted to the museums and major sites in Florence, although it doesn't pretend to be complete.  One thing is certain: they are among the heaviest books in my collection.

That is good information thank you. There is enough information on the back of the cards for me so I shouldn't need the big books.

Offline Brian

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #32 on: October 15, 2018, 07:09:57 AM »
Just arrived at home: a high-quality woodblock print from a work at the Toledo Museum of Art (hello, Cato!). Hiroshi Yoshida was a Japanese artist who traveled the national parks of America and depicted them in his own style.

We got Mount Rainier:



(The image is from Amazon but the print was not.)

We have three more on the way as well - still lifes by Manet and Cézanne for the dining room, and "Lake Keitele, 1905" by Gallen-Kallela, my favorite painting in the National Gallery in London.

Finally, in November a nearby artist colony is having its final open studio weekend - the building has been bought by developers and will become luxury apartments. Ugh and grr. But the artists there are superb and I have a mind to go drop considerable money in moral support of them.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2018, 07:12:34 AM by Brian »

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #33 on: October 15, 2018, 07:28:46 AM »
That’s a very nice print, Brian! Very American and very Japanese at the same time. Congratulations. :)
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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #34 on: October 15, 2018, 07:37:07 AM »
That’s a very nice print, Brian! Very American and very Japanese at the same time. Congratulations. :)
+1

And Gallén-Kallela's Keitele is one of my favourites, too.
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