Author Topic: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History  (Read 2707 times)

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Offline Alberich

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #40 on: May 19, 2017, 11:39:04 AM »
Many of Sibelius's mature works are also from period 1897-1922, as well as Richard Strauss's Salome, Elektra, Alpensinfonie, etc.
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Offline some guy

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #41 on: May 19, 2017, 11:44:19 AM »
1897-1922, which is the sparsest 25 year stretch ever.
Possibly the funniest thing anyone has ever posted, ever.

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Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #42 on: May 19, 2017, 11:49:53 AM »
1897-22 is the meat of Mahler, all of Debussy, the early 2nd Vienesse school, early Stravinsky

Exactly. Plus a lot of Sibelius and Ravel.  That's not an overwhelming amount of great stuff for a whole 25 years. That corpus you list doesn't match the 5 last years of Schubert's life, or just the works of Brahms in the preceding 25 years.   No period is devoid of great music, but this one is ... deficient. ;)
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Offline Marc

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #43 on: May 19, 2017, 12:00:25 PM »
[...]
I would easily skip 1609-1703, from the death of Gesualdo to the start of Bach's career
[...]

Which was probably the period that 'taught' Bach.

Without Sweelinck (and his pupils), Frescobaldi, Froberger, Schütz, Reincken, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, Böhm, and all the others I won't mention, Bach wouldn't be possible.
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Offline bwv 1080

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #44 on: May 19, 2017, 12:30:15 PM »
Which was probably the period that 'taught' Bach.

Without Sweelinck (and his pupils), Frescobaldi, Froberger, Schütz, Reincken, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, Böhm, and all the others I won't mention, Bach wouldn't be possible.

Yes, but thankfully there was Bach, so I can just skip over the lot of them.  Bach, Scarlatti & Rameau is all the Baroque I need
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Offline Marc

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #45 on: May 19, 2017, 12:42:57 PM »
Yes, but thankfully there was Bach, so I can just skip over the lot of them.  Bach, Scarlatti & Rameau is all the Baroque I need

Well, tastes differ. Of course I could say: check them out or listen again, but... why?

I'm happy, hope you're happy, too.

:)

I was mostly surprised by the word 'easily', I guess.
Anyway, as you might have guessed, I love the 17th century, that great 'whirlpool' of phantastico and antico, of north and south, of all the various pitches and temperaments.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 12:44:33 PM by Marc »
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Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #46 on: May 19, 2017, 01:20:03 PM »
Any choice would omit 1897-1922, which is the sparsest 25 year stretch ever.

Wrong thread, Ken. This belongs in the unpopular opinion thread  :D

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Offline jessop

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #47 on: May 19, 2017, 01:32:51 PM »
Another thing I just remembered about my preferred piece of music history is the early music revival and also it was when historically informed performance really began taking off. Some of my favourite musicians are associated with that movement.

Offline Ghost Sonata

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #48 on: May 19, 2017, 03:04:54 PM »
1900-1950, hands down, not merely for the work composed therein but for music history's broader appreciation for all or much that came before, which makes it a most singular half-century in time, give or take a few years... 
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Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #49 on: May 19, 2017, 04:12:01 PM »
Wrong thread, Ken. This belongs in the unpopular opinion thread  :D

Sarge

It surely does. :)
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Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #50 on: May 20, 2017, 08:51:20 AM »
Late Romantic, early modern period for me: 1878-1927

That is essentially right-on-the-dot with what I was thinking.

Quote
That covers Parsifal, Bruckner 1-9 (at least the later versions of the early symphonies), Brahms 3 & 4, Mahler, Dvorak 6-9, Sibelius,Fauré, Magnard, Elgar, Debussy, much of my favorite R.Strauss and Stravinsky, early Second Viennese School, and, of course, Havergal Brian's Gothic.

Good coverage. I'd add Liszt, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Martinu, Janacek, Bartok, Saint-Saens, Britten, and Ravel.
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #51 on: May 20, 2017, 09:13:58 AM »
That is essentially right-on-the-dot with what I was thinking.

Good coverage. I'd add Liszt, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Martinu, Janacek, Bartok, Saint-Saens, Britten, and Ravel.

We'd miss some of the great late works (Paganini Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances, Corelli Variations, Third Symphony) but yeah, Rach is essentially covered with a 1927 cutoff (most of the solo piano works, First and Second Symphonies, Bells, all the Concertos, operas, choral works).

Sarge
« Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 12:59:07 PM by Sergeant Rock »
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #52 on: May 20, 2017, 09:26:39 AM »
We'd miss some to the great late works (Paganini Rhapsody, Symphonic Dances, Corelli Variations, Third Symphony) but yeah, Rach is essentially covered with a 1927 cutoff (most of the solo piano works, First and Second Symphonies, Bells, all the Concertos, operas, choral works).

Sarge

Yeah that is some meaty Rach. More of a stretch might be my inclusion of Liszt, but I'm very partial to his late period. It sneaks up on you...
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #53 on: May 20, 2017, 12:53:14 PM »
Yes, but thankfully there was Bach, so I can just skip over the lot of them.  Bach, Scarlatti & Rameau is all the Baroque I need

Man are you missing a lot a great music with that attitude. Not even Handel?  ???

For example, the cantatas of Nikolaus Bruhns are imo very beautiful and sophisticated music and the model for Bach's early cantatas. Bruhns was such a talented genius who died too young but was nevertheless a "superstar" of his time. But you don't need that stuff do you? Your loss. My loss is that Bruhns' chamber music is completely lost.  :(
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Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #54 on: May 20, 2017, 01:11:54 PM »
More of a stretch might be my inclusion of Liszt, but I'm very partial to his late period.

As am I. Do you have this?




Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline 71 dB

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #55 on: May 20, 2017, 01:14:39 PM »
Which was probably the period that 'taught' Bach.

Without Sweelinck (and his pupils), Frescobaldi, Froberger, Schütz, Reincken, Pachelbel, Buxtehude, Böhm, and all the others I won't mention, Bach wouldn't be possible.

The greatness of Bach is the combination of his Einstein-level genius of counterpoint AND the legacy of Northern-Germany baroque before him. He met Buxtehude and studied the works of composers such as Bruhns and Kuhnau. No wonder he had superb premises to become the giant of baroque he is. 
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Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #56 on: May 20, 2017, 02:36:18 PM »
As am I. Do you have this?




Sarge


No, don't have it. I've actually never heard of Peter Toth. Went hunting around on the Amazons to learn more about him but came up with zilch. Seems to be on the obscure side.

But then headed over to YouTube and found some great stuff! Yeah, I like his Liszt, what there is of it on YouTube, anyway. You got me pining for this disc now, Sarge. But damn you it's expensive! :D
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #57 on: May 20, 2017, 03:40:12 PM »
Man are you missing a lot a great music with that attitude. Not even Handel?  ???

For example, the cantatas of Nikolaus Bruhns are imo very beautiful and sophisticated music and the model for Bach's early cantatas. Bruhns was such a talented genius who died too young but was nevertheless a "superstar" of his time. But you don't need that stuff do you? Your loss. My loss is that Bruhns' chamber music is completely lost.  :(

One of my great discoveries of recent years is Purcell. Smack in the middle!
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline aleazk

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #58 on: May 22, 2017, 08:19:20 PM »
1) 1950-2000

2) 1900-1950

3) 1150-1200

4) 1200-1250

5) 1250-1300

Offline jessop

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Re: Your Favorite 50-Year-Period in Music History
« Reply #59 on: May 22, 2017, 08:21:43 PM »


3) 1150-1200



I need recommendations :)

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