Author Topic: What is this orchestral work?  (Read 1985 times)

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Offline relm1

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What is this orchestral work?
« on: July 10, 2017, 10:21:47 AM »
Any ideas what this is?
http://picosong.com/WBFp/

It sounds like it could be Liszt. 

Offline donelson

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2018, 11:01:54 AM »
Wagner? Sounds familiar, but I don't know it.

Offline Josquin13

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2018, 03:38:00 PM »
It sounds familiar.  My first response was that it could be Russian, possibly Rimsky-Korsakov or Gliere.  But then, on further listening, it began to sound more early Romantic & German to me--like music by Schumann or Weber.   I don't think it's from one of Schumann's 4 Symphonies, but it could be an overture or one of his shorter orchestral works (such as the Konzerstücke for 4 Horns?).   It could also be an overture by Weber (perhaps Die Freischutz? etc.), or maybe from one of his 2 symphonies.  But it doesn't sound like Liszt or Mendelssohn to me, though it could be by them.  Nor do I think it's by Wagner, either.  So my guess is that it's either a work by Schumann or Weber, or by a composer that was strongly influenced by them (like one of the French composers).

Offline Cato

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2018, 06:35:35 AM »
It sounds familiar.  My first response was that it could be Russian, possibly Rimsky-Korsakov or Gliere.  But then, on further listening, it began to sound more early Romantic & German to me--like music by Schumann or Weber.   I don't think it's from one of Schumann's 4 Symphonies, but it could be an overture or one of his shorter orchestral works (such as the Konzerstücke for 4 Horns?).   It could also be an overture by Weber (perhaps Die Freischutz? etc.), or maybe from one of his 2 symphonies.  But it doesn't sound like Liszt or Mendelssohn to me, though it could be by them.  Nor do I think it's by Wagner, either.  So my guess is that it's either a work by Schumann or Weber, or by a composer that was strongly influenced by them (like one of the French composers).

Right, not from the Schumann symphonies, and it sounds post-C. M. Weber to my ears.  Perhaps it comes from Joachim Raff or one of the lesser known works of Franz von Suppe': it does have the aroma of opera music.
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Offline Jo498

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2018, 07:25:38 AM »
with the massive brass and cymbals it is definitely much later than Weber. I am not familiar enough with the Liszt symphonic poems but it is certainly closer to them in sound and style than to Schumann. So I'd say ca. 1850s-80s and it does sound "theatrical", so it could be an ouverture. Sounds more heavy than Suppé operetta, though.
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Baron Scarpia

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2018, 12:38:33 PM »
I'd guess a contemporary of Liszt/Wagner. Where did the file come from?

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2018, 02:14:01 PM »
I don't think it's from one of Schumann's 4 Symphonies, but it could be an overture or one of his shorter orchestral works (such as the Konzerstücke for 4 Horns?).

Definitely none of those things.  Certainly not Schumann.

Sounds like a parody of the most bombastic bits of Tchaikovsky to me.
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Baron Scarpia

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2018, 02:16:58 PM »
I sense a contradiction between the old fashioned style and the more harmonically advanced technique. Maybe from a Korngold film score?

Offline Brian

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2018, 11:16:39 AM »
I sense a contradiction between the old fashioned style and the more harmonically advanced technique. Maybe from a Korngold film score?
I can't recognize it either but agree that a 1940s-type Hollywood soundtrack is the best bet.

Offline Christo

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2018, 01:31:23 PM »
Definitely none of those things.  Certainly not Schumann.

Sounds like a parody of the most bombastic bits of Tchaikovsky to me.
Same here: a Tchaikovsky parody, possibly Von Suppé, perhaps Léhar, but older than Hollywood.
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Offline relm1

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2018, 03:38:34 PM »
It sounds familiar.  My first response was that it could be Russian, possibly Rimsky-Korsakov or Gliere.  But then, on further listening, it began to sound more early Romantic & German to me--like music by Schumann or Weber.   I don't think it's from one of Schumann's 4 Symphonies, but it could be an overture or one of his shorter orchestral works (such as the Konzerstücke for 4 Horns?).   It could also be an overture by Weber (perhaps Die Freischutz? etc.), or maybe from one of his 2 symphonies.  But it doesn't sound like Liszt or Mendelssohn to me, though it could be by them.  Nor do I think it's by Wagner, either.  So my guess is that it's either a work by Schumann or Weber, or by a composer that was strongly influenced by them (like one of the French composers).

I agree its more Hungarian/Germanic than Russian.  Sounds like it might be from an opera overture.  I don't think it is from Wagner either unless it is early Wagner which is less like his mature style.  I listened to all the Liszt tone poems thinking it might be one of those but it isn't though the mannerism and style is similar. 

Offline relm1

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2018, 03:39:56 PM »
I'd guess a contemporary of Liszt/Wagner. Where did the file come from?

I don't have a good answer to this question.  I found it on my computer when searching for something and it was just called good music. I have no idea where I got it from!

Offline relm1

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2018, 03:42:37 PM »
I sense a contradiction between the old fashioned style and the more harmonically advanced technique. Maybe from a Korngold film score?

If this is pastiche you are a genius for catching that because it is so close in style to romantic music.

Offline relm1

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2018, 03:44:33 PM »
Same here: a Tchaikovsky parody, possibly Von Suppé, perhaps Léhar, but older than Hollywood.

Very, very interesting.  I placed it around 1850 but some folks place it mid 20th century imitating mid 19th century. 

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2018, 09:21:38 PM »
Definitely sounds like a pastiche, and I am 99% certain I have heard this in a movie....but which one?

Online Biffo

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2018, 11:26:32 PM »
I would say that who ever wrote it had heard the Introduction to Act I of Die Walkure. Now I will probably be left with egg on my face when it turns out to pre-date that work.

Baron Scarpia

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2018, 11:45:17 AM »
What we need is the audio equivalent of google images.

Offline Ken B

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2018, 11:50:34 AM »
What we need is the audio equivalent of google images.
Shazam.
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ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2018, 02:32:28 PM »
Shazam.

I checked it yesterday but it didn't recognise the music.

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What is this orchestral work?
« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2018, 02:42:16 PM »
If this is a 19th century work it could be a very poor composition by someone influenced by Wagner.......the first person that comes to mind is Augusta Holmès but even her works sound much more authentic to the era than this. If this is an actual 19th century orchestral score I can only assume it is meant to parody more serious operas. Offenbach wrote an operetta satirising Wagner so it could be that, or something like it.

relm1, curiously, where did you first hear this and where did you get the sound file from?
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 02:44:10 PM by jessop »