Author Topic: In a Fugue State  (Read 1541 times)

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pjme

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Re: In a Fugue State
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2017, 08:57:53 AM »
Not only for his name....

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/Xvokr2eiLKs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/Xvokr2eiLKs</a>

Fuga, Sandro (1906 - 1994)
b Mogliano Veneto, 26 Nov 1906; d Turin, 1 March 1994). Italian composer and pianist. He studied at the Turin Conservatory with Matthey (organ, diploma 1924), Gallino (piano, diploma 1925) and Perrachio and Alfano (composition, diploma 1928). Until 1940 he was a concert pianist, making appearances in Italy and abroad; he subsequently devoted himself to composition and teaching.

P.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2017, 12:55:33 AM by pjme »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: In a Fugue State
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2017, 12:15:47 AM »
This comment from Jean Marc Aymes, from his essay on Gesualdo and Maione, made me think about my own initial reaction to this thread, that forms like fugues were inappropriate for oneiric music. I also thought the idea about dissonance was food for thought at least

Quote
The music of Gesualdo is a music of distortions, much more than of dissonances. Let us venture a hypothesis: does the strangeness of the prince’s language not derive from the conflict between a style of writing – polyphony and its strict re- spect for the rules of counterpoint – that was thought of in the Renaissance as the idealised reflection of a world of perfection, and a new apprehension of human life, seen as a chaotic, absurd dream, without any goal unless it be a vague promise of posthumous bliss, a viewpoint that the work of music seeks to express? Pleasure is indissociable from pain; in the midst of life we are in death. The ornamental intensification of the cults of death by the Roman Catholic Church became a further expression of this new perception. In this musical language, the dissonance produced by the tortured part-writing within the contrapuntal texture exalts pain by refusing to resolve or by opting for false resolution through chro- matic slippage that seems to cut the ground from under our feet.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Cato

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Re: In a Fugue State
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2017, 04:54:25 AM »
This comment from Jean Marc Aymes, from his essay on Gesualdo and Maione, made me think about my own initial reaction to this thread, that forms like fugues were inappropriate for oneiric music. I also thought the idea about dissonance was food for thought at least

Gesualdo's Moro lasso has fugal aspects, and I think many of his songs have a dreamlike aspect.

Many thanks for the reference!  I will need to find that essay!
COWBOY (sitting down to a poker game for the first time): "Is this a game of chance?!"

- W. C. FIELDS  (as Cuthbert Twillie): "Uhh, not the way I play it, no." in  My Little Chickadee.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: In a Fugue State
« Reply #23 on: August 03, 2017, 12:16:00 PM »
I guess Aymes is attributing this familiar idea to Gesualdo

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day,
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player,
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.




What I'm not clear about is how distinctively modern this idea is.
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Offline Cato

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Re: In a Fugue State
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2017, 03:04:18 AM »
For the film buffs ... Agnès Varda's masterpiece "Le Bonheur" (1965) came to mind when reading the fugue and jumping off a cliff bit above ... the film is amazing with respect to what can be seen and what is told ... and music by Mozart, including Adagio and Fugue in C minor (KV 546) plays a most important role. For starters, just check out how images and music are intercut in the opening:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/4rEcvmCEO08" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/4rEcvmCEO08</a>

And go here to read some more about it:
https://celluloidwickerman.com/2014/06/09/mozart-in-le-bonheur-1965-agnes-varda/


Also, the very first thing that came to mind when reading the title - can't be absent here:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/QZM4yxbE0ZE" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/QZM4yxbE0ZE</a>

Many thanks for those!  The latter led me to YouTube, where another version with the sheet music is available!

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/pHW1I8T0caI" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/pHW1I8T0caI</a>
COWBOY (sitting down to a poker game for the first time): "Is this a game of chance?!"

- W. C. FIELDS  (as Cuthbert Twillie): "Uhh, not the way I play it, no." in  My Little Chickadee.