Author Topic: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?  (Read 9145 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline huntsman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 171
  • Location: Jo'Burg, South Africa
  • Currently Listening to:
    Fritz Delius...for the month of April. (Ok, and May!)
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2013, 06:55:23 AM »
As a chap very new to classical music I would like to know the difference between consort and chamber music.

Anyone?
RAP - Add a C to improve it...

Offline petrarch

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1397
  • Luigi Nono (1924-1990)
  • Location: Boston, MA
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2013, 07:03:36 AM »
One of my favorite pieces of music, and possibly favorite composer of this era, is Dowland's Lachrimae.

Indeed. One rendition I am very partial to is Thomas Morley's Lachrimae Pavane for keyboard, after Dowland's famous work.
//p
The music collection.
The hi-fi system: Esoteric X-03SE -> Pathos Logos -> Analysis Audio Amphitryon.
A view of the whole

Offline TheGSMoeller

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10943
  • Monkey Greg.
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2013, 02:27:56 AM »
As a chap very new to classical music I would like to know the difference between consort and chamber music.

Anyone?

Not sure how accurate this is, but..."consort" was primarily used in England referring to a small set up of instruments. It predates the term "chamber", but they are very similar in meaning.

Offline TheGSMoeller

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10943
  • Monkey Greg.
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2013, 02:33:43 AM »
Indeed. One rendition I am very partial to is Thomas Morley's Lachrimae Pavane for keyboard, after Dowland's famous work.

Hey, petrarch  :)

Not sure if I'm familiar with Morley's, I do however have this disc with Patrick Ayrton performing a Pavana Lachrymae by Byrd after Dowland. I only have the MP3 of this disc so I'm missing the booklet information.



Offline Octave

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2029
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2013, 03:22:44 AM »
As a chap very new to classical music I would like to know the difference between consort and chamber music.
Anyone?

GMG veterans might differ with me, huntsman, but I think you could do much worse than to get that cheap Fretwork ENGLISH MUSIC 5cd as a first (?) helping of some of this music.  I like all the music therein, but the two discs of Lawes knocked me out.  I am overdue to hear more of his music, which I will do soon. 
Consorts of viols make me think of cellos melting, though I have never actually heard cellos melting.
Help support GMG by purchasing items from Amazon through this link.

Offline val

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2090
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2013, 05:45:03 AM »
Purcell and Gibbons works for Consort of Viols. The works of Gibbons are really extraordinary. Not forgetting the Concertos for viols of Sainte-Colombe.

Offline huntsman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 171
  • Location: Jo'Burg, South Africa
  • Currently Listening to:
    Fritz Delius...for the month of April. (Ok, and May!)
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2013, 07:31:11 AM »
So consort is a word to describe the chamber ensemble, but with specificity to period?

Well, I dived right in and ordered the one Lawes album, (Knock somethingorother) and can't wait for it to dribble in slowly via our amazingly efficient postal (lack of) service...  >:D

Thanks for the replies!  ;D
RAP - Add a C to improve it...

Offline petrarch

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1397
  • Luigi Nono (1924-1990)
  • Location: Boston, MA
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2013, 05:02:21 PM »
So consort is a word to describe the chamber ensemble, but with specificity to period?

And geography.
//p
The music collection.
The hi-fi system: Esoteric X-03SE -> Pathos Logos -> Analysis Audio Amphitryon.
A view of the whole

Offline huntsman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 171
  • Location: Jo'Burg, South Africa
  • Currently Listening to:
    Fritz Delius...for the month of April. (Ok, and May!)
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2013, 07:57:26 PM »
How so?
RAP - Add a C to improve it...

ibanezmonster

  • Guest
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #29 on: March 18, 2013, 08:45:43 PM »
How so?


Not sure how accurate this is, but..."consort" was primarily used in England referring to a small set up of instruments. It predates the term "chamber", but they are very similar in meaning.
the bold part?

Online Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14986
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #30 on: March 18, 2013, 11:03:17 PM »
Oh, come on guys... 8) It takes 5 seconds:

Quote
A consort of instruments was a phrase used in England during the 16th and 17th centuries to indicate an instrumental ensemble. These could be of the same or a variety of instruments. Consort music enjoyed considerable popularity at court and in households of the wealthy in the Elizabethan era and many pieces were written for consorts by the major composers of the period. In the Baroque era consort music was absorbed into chamber music.

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline huntsman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 171
  • Location: Jo'Burg, South Africa
  • Currently Listening to:
    Fritz Delius...for the month of April. (Ok, and May!)
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2013, 07:09:51 AM »
Imagine if we Googled every question - we'd save ourselves hours monthly on a host of topic-specific web sites...

 ;)
RAP - Add a C to improve it...

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3779
  • Location: Germany
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #32 on: January 02, 2018, 05:53:39 AM »
Any comments on this one? Still a contender or mainly of historical interest?



Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9365
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #33 on: January 02, 2018, 06:33:07 AM »
Any comments on this one? Still a contender or mainly of historical interest?



It's hard for me to comment with total confidence because I don't have exactly the same recording that you linked. But I do have quite a lot of the music played by the same people. It would be good if you could find a detailed listing of what's on there.

I can say that although I'm not a great Lawes person, if there was more like Leonhardt etc playing the D minor sonata with organ I'd be his biggest fan. I can also say that Leonhardt playing solo Farnaby, Tisdale, Byrd, Bull etc is sensational. 

The sound of the consort music is OK, perfectly enjoyable to hear if obviously dated. The solo harpsichord music is even better recorded.

But that amazon link mentions Locke (Consort of Fower Parts) and The Old Spagnoletta and lots of other stuff I don't know about, maybe played by Harnoncourt or Thomas Binkley.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 06:38:49 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Jo498

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3779
  • Location: Germany
Re: 16th & 17th Century Consort Musik - your favorites?
« Reply #34 on: January 02, 2018, 08:40:33 AM »
Thanks, it is probably a compilation from three or more Das Alte Werk LPs; from the clips I also liked the sound of the keyboard music best.
This is the most detailed content info I can find:
http://www.warnerclassics.com/shop/382252,0825646976546/das-alte-werk-english-music-of-the-17th-century
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)