Author Topic: Request for suggestions  (Read 624 times)

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Offline Daimonion

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Request for suggestions
« on: January 10, 2018, 04:34:00 PM »
Dear All,

I am a newbie in the field of classical music and now I am exploring the latter with curiosity. Among the pieces that I like are:
- so called holy minimalism like Part (Salve Regina, Triodion), Tavener (Funeral Canticle) or even Glass (Metamorphosis)
- Renaissance polyphony
- Bach - Art of Fugue, Goldberg Variations, Well-tempered Clavier
- Chopin - Nocturnes
I also seem to prefer rather slow tempo (like adagio).

Could you please suggest something similar that I could, probably of course, enjoy as well?
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 04:39:35 PM by Daimonion »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 06:54:33 PM »
Debussy and Sibelius...you’re welcome. ;) :D
"I haven't understood a bar of music in my life, but I have felt it.” - Igor Stravinsky

Offline XB-70 Valkyrie

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 08:45:02 PM »
Since you seem to like the Bach keyboard music, I would suggest you try some of the organ music. For a beginner not necessarily used to less than modern stereo sound, I would suggest you try some recordings by Peter Hurford, later Marie-Claire Alain, Helmut Walcha

I like the Chopin nocturnes a great deal too, but I am less than enthusiastic about most of his other works. Overall, I greatly prefer the piano music of Robert Schumann, Alexander Scriabin, and Johannes Brahms--some of which is similar in style.
If you really dislike Bach you keep quiet about it! - Andras Schiff

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 03:49:36 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline San Antone

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 04:13:00 AM »
Dear All,

I am a newbie in the field of classical music and now I am exploring the latter with curiosity. Among the pieces that I like are:
- so called holy minimalism like Part (Salve Regina, Triodion), Tavener (Funeral Canticle) or even Glass (Metamorphosis)
- Renaissance polyphony
- Bach - Art of Fugue, Goldberg Variations, Well-tempered Clavier
- Chopin - Nocturnes
I also seem to prefer rather slow tempo (like adagio).

Could you please suggest something similar that I could, probably of course, enjoy as well?

"so called holy minimalism"
Kanon Pokajanen is a 1997 composition by Arvo Pärt, also, Annum per annum

"Renaissance polyphony"
well, a bit earlier, by about 100 years, but Guillaume de Machaut's music is fantastic, as is Guillaume Dufay - anything.  You might also like songs of the troubadours and trouveres.  Several recordings are available, but if you could find the La Troba series (Gérard Zuchetto, dir.) - grab them up.


Offline Christabel

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 08:03:26 PM »
I'd completely concur with those comments about Machaut.  His music is sublime and seldom heard.  Of course, it is an acquired taste.  I wouldn't jump in right away to this musical period without some experience of pre-tonal music in general.

Offline Spineur

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2018, 01:39:04 AM »
You may want to try the contemporary french composer Philippe Hersant, who uses medieval music as one of his inspiration.  I started a thread about him.  One of my favorite CD of him is instants limites



Then there is the unavoidable Satie.  Very minimal music too.

A woman voice glides like the wind
Of black, of damp, of night
And all it touches in this flight
Suddenly is over.

Anna Akhomatova

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2018, 04:21:12 AM »
I'd completely concur with those comments about Machaut.  His music is sublime and seldom heard.  Of course, it is an acquired taste.  I wouldn't jump in right away to this musical period without some experience of pre-tonal music in general.

But, you never know.  There are listeners for whom this is a perfectly enthusiasmogenic entrée.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Daimonion

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2018, 04:31:59 AM »
But, you never know.  There are listeners for whom this is a perfectly enthusiasmogenic entrée.

Well, in fact I've already tried a bit of both Guillaume de Machaut and Guillaume Dufay and am just about to explore deeper. Also, I've already ordered two books on the history of music to get to know the respective background.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2018, 10:28:32 AM »
Dear All,

I am a newbie in the field of classical music and now I am exploring the latter with curiosity. Among the pieces that I like are:
- so called holy minimalism like Part (Salve Regina, Triodion), Tavener (Funeral Canticle) or even Glass (Metamorphosis)
- Renaissance polyphony
- Bach - Art of Fugue, Goldberg Variations, Well-tempered Clavier
- Chopin - Nocturnes
I also seem to prefer rather slow tempo (like adagio).

Could you please suggest something similar that I could, probably of course, enjoy as well?

When I read this the first things I thought of were  a couple of CDs by Jordi Savall called El Cant de Sibil La, some late Froberger (there's a Froberger thread somewhere on the website with some descriptions of recordings), something by Gaultier - jeune et vieux -  Louis Pernot's recording if you can find it, but really jump in anywhere, Stockhausen's Stimmung, Cage's quartet piece called Four, and something late by Feldman, maybe Ronnie Paterson's recording of Palais de Marie if you like piano. Oh, and Ensemble Organum's recording called Le Chant des Templiers.

If you want to go in the Machaut direction, I've a strong intuition that you'll enjoy Marc Mauillon's work, there's a CD called Remède de Fortune, or something like that.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 12:28:09 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mahlerian

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 10:17:24 AM »
Based on your interest in Renaissance choral music, this might appeal:
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/rYX1q9kBWvo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/rYX1q9kBWvo</a>

Online Daverz

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 04:10:57 PM »
- so called holy minimalism like Part (Salve Regina, Triodion), Tavener (Funeral Canticle) or even Glass (Metamorphosis)

Try some Morton Feldman.  His Rothko Chapel is a good starting point:



Quite different from the composers you mention, but may have a similar appeal.

« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 04:42:11 PM by Daverz »

Offline jessop

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2018, 04:27:10 PM »
I was gonna mention Feldman as well, but also some of Cage's Number Pieces might be a nice area to explore

Offline Monsieur Croche

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2018, 08:07:52 AM »


John C. Adams:
Common Tones in Simple Time, for orchestra
The note activity is 'aflutter,' while the overall feel is still of a placid continuum that feels, as someone said, like gliding over a landscape
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hH2yfw-UkI0
Harmonium ~ his contemporary yet quite traditional piece for chorus and large orchestra...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vfMbyjvVKUc

Steve Reich ~ Variations for winds, strings and keyboards
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sgjwiadze1w

David Lang ~ The Passing Measures, for small chorus, chamber ensemble of amplified instruments, the work is a very soft dynamic throughout. IMO, a gorgeous piece.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jZsaUOQofU
...Lang's short and lovely piano piece, Wed
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuOtLBKscuY

Gavin Bryars ~ The South Downs, for 'Cello and Piano
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMb8ecR1cKI

John Luther Adams ~ Dark Waves, for orchestra and electronic sounds.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf9XpWlZ3M8
Become Ocean ~ for orchestra
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGva1NVWRXk

Nikolai Korndorf ~ Hymn III for orchestra. An Hommage to Mahler, without at all imitating Mahler. Somewhere in a vein of 'minimal' if not the usual minimalist.  Beautiful work.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOrLMDTgO0Y

Morton Feldman ~ Piano and String Quartet
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEzPYIkfYOk

Most would agree that, technically, this one is not classical, but Brian Eno is the one who first composed his piece "Music for Airports" and then coined the word 'Ambient' to describe the aesthetic. Here is, imo, one of his best pieces in that mode....
Brian Eno ~ Thursday Afternoon
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLTPyRXUKc

Jonathan Harvey ~ Tranquil Abiding, two slowing oscillating harmonies, with other lyric 'melodic' content changing the texture and landscape.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HoXKARMGYPI

Joep Franssens ~ Harmony of the Spheres, for acapella chorus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLkmMEEiNBk

Of course I recommend placing all of these on a playlist in your computer, and also do take the time to mark the titles and composers in case a link is taken down, then check them out as you will.

Happy adventures and best regards.
~ I'm all for personal expression; it just has to express something to me. ~

Offline Pat B

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2018, 01:50:14 PM »
Most would agree that, technically, this one is not classical, but Brian Eno is the one who first composed his piece "Music for Airports" and then coined the word 'Ambient' to describe the aesthetic. Here is, imo, one of his best pieces in that mode....
Brian Eno ~ Thursday Afternoon
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggLTPyRXUKc

Oh! That reminds me: William Basinski: The Disintegration Loops.

Offline bwv 1080

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2018, 02:00:12 PM »
Dear All,

I am a newbie in the field of classical music and now I am exploring the latter with curiosity. Among the pieces that I like are:
- so called holy minimalism like Part (Salve Regina, Triodion), Tavener (Funeral Canticle) or even Glass (Metamorphosis)
- Renaissance polyphony
- Bach - Art of Fugue, Goldberg Variations, Well-tempered Clavier
- Chopin - Nocturnes
I also seem to prefer rather slow tempo (like adagio).

Could you please suggest something similar that I could, probably of course, enjoy as well?

Think everything there can be found in this:

Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum

Offline Josquin13

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2018, 05:38:07 PM »
Renaissance polyphony is my favorite era of music, so I should be able to give you some valuable guidance about what to sample:

1. Yes, I strongly agree about exploring the music of Machaut and Dufay.  With Machaut, I'd recommend hearing the series of recordings by Ensemble Musica Nova, or these days I believe they just call themselves Ensemble Nova.  I'd also recommend Thomas Binckley's older recordings of Machaut motets, a single CD by Liber UnUsualis--a Boston based group, along with a CD by Ensemble Project Ars Nova (or P.A.N.), and a CD by The Clerks' Group (the Ivrea Codex).  The current Orlando Consort series is good too, though I generally prefer the suggestions above (from what I've heard so far, even though the Orlandos are one of my favorite groups & their intended "complete" series is most valuable).  There is also an excellent 3 CD bargain set on the Brilliant label from Ensemble Gilles Binchois, which used to be quite inexpensive:

https://www.amazon.com/Memoriam-Messe-Notre-Dame/dp/B003ZWPAYQ/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054994&sr=1-3&keywords=machaut+aeon

https://www.amazon.com/Motets-Machaut/dp/B004V4GXY8/ref=pd_sbs_15_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B004V4GXY8&pd_rd_r=GF8TRVQ36RVXGPXW17QP&pd_rd_w=vtHur&pd_rd_wg=Rz59x&psc=1&refRID=GF8TRVQ36RVXGPXW17QP

https://www.amazon.com/Ballads-MACHAUT-GUILLAUME/dp/B002P9KAE0/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054269&sr=1-2&keywords=machaut+ensemble+musica+nova

https://www.amazon.com/Machaut-Remede-Fortune-Guillaume/dp/B000000R3S/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054440&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=machaut+ensemble+musica+nova+notre+dam

https://www.amazon.com/Guillaume-Machaut-Unrequited-Liber-unUsualis/dp/B00027P9OI/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054593&sr=1-1&keywords=machaut+liber+Unusualis

https://www.amazon.com/Machaut-Motets-Music-Wickham-Clerks/dp/B00000J2SJ/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054723&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=wickham+clerks+chantilly+codex

https://www.amazon.com/Ensemble-Binchois-Dominique-Machaut-Geistliche-S%C3%A4kulare/dp/B017IWGVYQ/ref=sr_1_9?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516056000&sr=1-9&keywords=ensemble+gilles+binchois+machaut (Unfortunately, it's become more pricey than it used to be, so you might check other listings, if interested.)

2. You should also try to hear virtually any compilation of music from the Chantilly Codex:

https://www.amazon.com/Ars-Magis-Subtiliter-Secular-Chantilly/dp/B000000R2J/ref=sr_1_3?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054624&sr=1-3&keywords=ensemble+nova

https://www.amazon.com/Figures-Harmony-Songs-Codex-Chantilly/dp/B00SBVHEY0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516056601&sr=1-1&keywords=chantilly+codex

https://www.amazon.com/Codex-Chantilly-Ballades-Marcel-P%C3%A9r%C3%A8s/dp/B000FDFO1M/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516056601&sr=1-2&keywords=chantilly+codexTo

3. Plus, the music of Philippe de Vitry and Johannes Ciconia:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GFYADVA/ref=dm_ws_sp_ps_dp

https://www.amazon.com/Ciconia-Opera-Omnia-Complete-Works/dp/B0053SQSNM/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516054926&sr=1-1&keywords=johannes+ciconia

4. Among my favorite CDs of music by Guillaume Dufay, for starters, I'd recommend a release from the Blue Heron Renaissance Choir of Dufay motets, especially the beautiful "Flos florum", the Hilliard Ensemble singing his motet "Nuper Rosarum Flores", Kees Boeke's two recordings with Cantica Symphonia, La Reverdie's two recordings, and a now out of print older release from Kees Otten and Syntagma Musicum, Amsterdam, entitled, "Guillaume Dufay and his times" (if you can find it at a reasonable price):

https://www.amazon.com/Dufay-Motets-Blue-Heron/dp/B00IQ2GWL0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516055324&sr=8-1&keywords=dufay+blue+heron

https://www.amazon.com/Nuper-rosarum-flores-Terribilis-locus/dp/B07734SJTV/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516055513&sr=8-1&keywords=Hilliard+ensemble+nuper+rosarum+flores

https://www.amazon.com/Voyage-en-Italie-Reverdie/dp/B00KWH1KNC/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?s=dmusic&ie=UTF8&qid=1516065789&sr=1-1-fkmr0&keywords=La+Reverdie+voyage+to+italie

https://www.amazon.com/Dufay-Missa-LHomme-Arme-Motets/dp/B00000DNIB/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516055598&sr=1-1&keywords=Hilliard+ensemble+dufay (this early EMI release, now OOP, might need a new remastering, so you should probably try to find its contents in one of the Hilliard's box set collections, if interested.)

https://www.amazon.com/Dufay-Fragmenta-Missarum-Kees-Boeke/dp/B01LZUYS31/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1516057531&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=Kees+Boeke+Dufay

https://www.amazon.de/Guillaume-Dufay-seine-Zeit-Otten/dp/B00002460N/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1516060071&sr=8-1&keywords=Guillaume+Dufay+teldec

5. The astronomer, mathematician, composer, & mystic John Dunstable (sometimes Dunstaple) is another of my favorite Burgundian composers (he was very influential on Dufay), and there are two recordings that I'd most recommend: one from the Hilliard Ensemble, which contains my favorite version of Dunstable's motet "Veni Sancte Spiritus", and the other CD from the Orlando Consort:

https://www.amazon.com/Power-Dunstaple-Masses-Hilliard-Ensemble/dp/B0074DXR4M/ref=pd_sim_15_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0074DXR4M&pd_rd_r=AG4PBF38FRRJMBMRV1NP&pd_rd_w=rQhd7&pd_rd_wg=Y1WPA&psc=1&refRID=AG4PBF38FRRJMBMRV1NP

6. Two other fine early Hilliard Ensemble recordings include the "Old Hall Manuscript" (I generally prefer the Hilliards when Paul Hillier sang with the group), and music of Perotin (from the early Notre Dame Cathedral school--this is where Phillip Glass derives his 'repetitive' style):

https://www.amazon.com/Hilliard-Ensemble-Old-Hall-Manuscript/dp/B00000DNOA/ref=pd_sbs_15_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00000DNOA&pd_rd_r=MVN0Q10GV4A7631P35S7&pd_rd_w=fzqMJ&pd_rd_wg=8TOxh&psc=1&refRID=MVN0Q10GV4A7631P35S7

https://www.amazon.com/Perotin/dp/B000025ZXO/ref=pd_sbs_15_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B000025ZXO&pd_rd_r=AY8XFRSE26RNZ1HJ2SC0&pd_rd_w=aX0pw&pd_rd_wg=1pm9i&psc=1&refRID=AY8XFRSE26RNZ1HJ2SC0

This compilation CD of the Hilliard's is also very recommendable (at least, as a starting point):

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Introitus-Josquin-Desprez/dp/B000025BZ6/ref=sr_1_124?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516063463&sr=1-124&keywords=josquin

7. Along with Dufay, the music of Josquin Desprez is essential too.  In Josquin's motets, the Orlando Consort is remarkable, and their single Archiv CD goes with me to my desert island (though it may take a little tracking down--you might first try Amazon UK: EDIT--I found it, see my link below):

https://www.amazon.com/Josquin-Desprez-Motets-Orlando-Consort/dp/B0018P0Y0W/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1516057005&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=orlando+consort+josquin

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Josquin-Desprez-Motets-Orlando-Consort/dp/B001N2KLYO/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1516061928&sr=8-2&keywords=orlando+consort+josquin

The Hilliard Ensemble is also excellent in this repertory:

https://www.amazon.com/Josquin-Desprez-Chansons-Hilliard-Ensemble/dp/B0130P1QX6/ref=sr_1_1?s=dmusic&ie=UTF8&qid=1516057068&sr=1-1-mp3-albums-bar-strip-0&keywords=Hilliard+ensemble+josquin

As an alternative to the above Hilliard recordings, there is the following Erato box set, which makes an excellent bargain at $16 (& is a good place to start), especially since it includes the "Seven Penitential Psalms" of Orlando Lassus (or Roland de Lassus, or Orlando di Lasso, etc.--take your pick), which are among the most essential masterpieces from the late Renaissance, and Johannes Ockeghem's early Requiem, which is the very first Requiem ever composed (not counting Dufay's now lost Requiem):

https://www.amazon.com/Franco-Flemish-Masterworks-Hilliard-Ensemble/dp/B008BT104M/ref=sr_1_5?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516057191&sr=1-5&keywords=Hilliard+Ensemble

There is also a fine recording by Henry's Eight of these Psalms, which differs from the Hilliard performances by not including instrumental accompaniment (in the Hilliard's case, they are accompanied by the Kees Boeke Ensemble).

In addition, the Italian group De Labyrintho, led by Walter Testolin, has likewise made two wonderful CDs of Josquin's music--my favorite of which is a CD entitled, "Musica Symbolica".  That CD includes the finest version of Josquin's masterpiece, Missa Gaudeamus, that I've heard to date:

https://www.amazon.com/Josquin-Desprez-Musica-Symbolica-Labyrintho/dp/B000E1P21W/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516058491&sr=1-1&keywords=de+labyrintho+desprez

De Labyrintho's other CD includes Josquin's moving motet, "Miserere mei Deus"--considered by some scholars to be one of the greatest works of the Renaissance:

https://www.amazon.com/Missa-Hercules-Ferrariae-Josquin-Desprez/dp/B002OHQNUI/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516058491&sr=1-2&keywords=de+labyrintho+desprez

Unfortunately, the CDs linked above have become pricey on Amazon, so you'll have to look elsewhere for them, if interested, or wait until there is a break in the prices (which I've noticed happens occasionally).  In the meantime, you can listen to both CDs for free in their entirety on You Tube!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Gab8Pej-FQ&list=PL0TpKeoANstLfe5wfHTcXiVEiZcycgiFd

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4-OWaXeWPw&list=PL0dUiHfM5X7YhovNFMX7T6Cd5VvBWuhd4

EDIT: I found Musica Symbolica at a reasonable price:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Josquin-Missa-Gaudeamus-Motets-Desprez/dp/B000E1P21W/ref=sr_1_40?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516062845&sr=1-40&keywords=josquin

Plus, a very fine CD from Ensemble Jachet de Mantoue, which has likewise become pricey, unfortunately:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Josquin-Desprez-Mater-Magnificat-Salve-Ensemble-Mantoue/dp/B01N8Z2KLJ/ref=sr_1_35?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516062845&sr=1-35&keywords=josquin

and a CD of Chansons by Josquin from Ensemble Musica Nova:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I101IL6/ref=dm_ws_sp_ps_dp

8. Among late Renaissance instrumental music, I'd also strongly recommend the "Fantasies" by Eustache du Caurroy.  Jordi Savall has recorded 33 of them with his group Hesperion XX:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZ0tKNP_mkE

9. Or, you can simply begin with this superb box set of Franco-Flemish polyphony, which is a treasure:

https://www.amazon.com/Flemish-Polyphony-Fiamminghi/dp/B005IIA9GY/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516058841&sr=1-1&keywords=flemish+polyphony

or this ethereal CD of the largest choral works composed during the Renaissance:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Utopia-Triumphans-Thomas-Tallis/dp/B0000262DQ/ref=sr_1_146?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516063737&sr=1-146&keywords=josquin

or this classic CD from the Tallis Scholars, which includes Allegri's Miserere:

https://www.amazon.com/Allegri-Miserere-Palestrina-Marcelli-Caelestis/dp/B000059GLW/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516065056&sr=1-1&keywords=tallis+scholars+allegri+mundy

10. Which reminds me of the English Renaissance, and the music of Thomas Tallis, William Byrd, John Sheppard, Orlando Gibbons, and John Dowland, who are likewise essential (particularly Tallis & Byrd).  You might start with the motets "Spem in Alium" (for 60 voices!) and "Miserere" by Tallis:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tallis-Spem-alium-Magnificat/dp/B00JG08G4M/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516063862&sr=1-1&keywords=magnificat+tallis

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sacred-Music-Wulstan-Clerkes-Oxenford/dp/B000089HB5/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1516064094&sr=1-2&keywords=tallis+david+wulstan

11. Finally, in closing, here's a list of some of the ensembles that are favorites of mine (both past & present), and which I think you can most depend on for future reference (although there's always new groups appearing on the scene, & I'm sure I'll forget to mention some favorites...):

La Main Harmonique, Cinquecento, Ensemble Jachet de Mantoue, Ensemble Project Ars Nova, Orlando Consort, De Labyrintho, Hilliard Ensemble (with Paul Hillier), La Reverdie, Capilla Flamenca, Red Byrd, Henry's Eight, Orlando di Lasso Ensemble/ Hanover, Ensemble Musica Nova, Diabolus in Musica, La Morra, The Clerks' Group, Hesperion, Ensemble Gilles Binchois, Huelgas Ensemble, Weser-Renaissance, Stimmwerck, The Medieval Ensemble of London, Ferrara Ensemble, Cappella Pratensis, The Sound and the Fury (though not consistently I've found), Tallis Scholars (but not always without reservations), The Binchois Consort (again, sometimes not without reservations), Gothic Voices, Sequentia, Chapelle du Roi, New York Polyphony, Magnificat, Fretwork, The Consort of Musicke (led by Anthony Rooley), The King's Noyse, Piffaro, Phantasm, Tasto Solo, Ensemble Leones, and the Dufay Collective.   

I should also mention that in the past, I've liked the pioneering recordings of the Early Music Consort of London, led by David Munrow, and especially their box set recordings of "The Gothic Age" and "The Art of the Netherlands".

I realize that I've made a very lengthy post (which is intended for you to go thru over time), but believe me, I've only scratched the surface...  & now realize that I didn't even get to the Iberian peninsula--Victoria, Guerrero, Morales, Cardoso, Lobos, etc., or Venice either...   















« Last Edit: January 15, 2018, 05:51:51 PM by Josquin13 »

Offline Monsieur Croche

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Re: Request for suggestions
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2018, 06:12:54 PM »
Single movements from multi-movement works, I think these are widely known and in a way popular. (This is somewhat considered not kosher "cherry-picking," or like reading only one chapter of a whole book, but I admit to doing it once in a while, 'purist' that I am.  Besides which the single movement that attracts might find you curious enough to investigate the whole piece, which is what I recommend and hope happens.)

Einojuhani Rautavaara Symphony No. 7, 1st movement, Tranquillo.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mafe558SOjs

Henryk Gorecki ~ Symphony No. 3, III, Lento - Cantabile-Semplice... a highly static oscillating harmony with a pulse that feels a bit like a heartbeat, over which a simple and lovely (and poignant) vocal line is set. (movement III begins at 36:30)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcfy3UmnyDY

These two piano concerti are both famous, with well-loved middle movements with slow, long "floating" melodic lines
Mozart ~ Piano Concerto No.21 in C major K467 II. Andante (start at 13:00)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-WoXsL2ZTA
Maurice Ravel ~ Piano Concerto in G, II. adagio assai (in the drop down menu under 'more' there is a click-on link to directly start this movement -- at 7:45)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXcdoLVkVL4

In a similar vein... I am a fan, so here are a number of recommends by
Francis Poulenc ~
Concerto for Piano
, the second movement marked 'very calm,' (start at 10:30)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hl_zkSYVGU

...back to full pieces, now.

too, his Elegie for two pianos, a brief piece...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJRBxjX5AqE

His Concerto for Organ, Timpani and Strings in G minor is a fine piece.  It is exciting, and it marked a step in a new phase for him, fusing ancient musical liturgical practice with his own stripe of conservative modern harmony.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RduLr1Cp9Ls

Poulenc wrote some wonderful choral music which I think you might very much like, both the larger choral works (i.e. works with chorus and orchestra) Gloria
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Wdbj1jkdGo
and his Stabat Mater
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5D_bPhYajeY

There are also single works and sets of pieces for acapella chorus.
Quatre Motets pour un Temps de Pénitence
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUDfA9EhE50

Again, rack'em up on a playlist and when and if you will, listen.


Best regards.
~ I'm all for personal expression; it just has to express something to me. ~

Offline Monsieur Croche

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~ I'm all for personal expression; it just has to express something to me. ~

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