Author Topic: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased  (Read 5408 times)

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Offline JBS

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2019, 08:59:37 PM »
Resizing is allowed

Offline NikF

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #41 on: February 08, 2019, 03:06:42 AM »
Not a huge number, but we have had this for a while

 Removed for size: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91YIH8uItwL.jpg

And have several Casson prints including




Good stuff, Ken B. I don't really know Casson and the only other of that group I'm at all familiar with is Frederick Varly.

Submitted a successful bid for this print by Manuel Ángeles Ortiz at an auction here in Madrid in mid-July:





And what about you, ritter, how are you getting on with this? Are you living with it on a daily basis?


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Offline ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #42 on: February 09, 2019, 08:36:13 AM »
...
And what about you, ritter, how are you getting on with this? Are you living with it on a daily basis?
Oh yes, it’s doing its job splendidly! Thanks for asking.  :)

Since I bought it, it has some companions...

Two woodcuts by Raoul Dufy (as reported in the avatar thread):

 

And a late (1959)  lithograph by Georges Braque (my copy being inscribed by the artist to Fernand Mourlot, the man who ran the workshop where most of the leading artists in Paris in the mid-20th century created their work in the lithographic medium):

« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 09:14:50 AM by ritter »
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NikF4

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #43 on: February 10, 2019, 04:15:06 AM »
Oh yes, it’s doing its job splendidly! Thanks for asking.  :)

Since I bought it, it has some companions...

Two woodcuts by Raoul Dufy (as reported in the avatar thread):

 

And a late (1959)  lithograph by Georges Braque (my copy being inscribed by the artist to Fernand Mourlot, the man who ran the workshop where most of the leading artists in Paris in the mid-20th century created their work in the lithographic medium):




You're welcome.


Interesting purchases as ever - and the unique feature of the Braque litho making it particularly cool. Good stuff.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2019, 07:09:05 AM »
Received now. An excellent book:

As is this:

Nemon sculpted Churchill many times but the cover shows Churchill's one and only sculpture - his portrait of Oscar Nemon.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 07:11:51 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

NikF4

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #45 on: February 26, 2019, 12:33:42 AM »
Do this stuff count?  ;D



I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -




Offline vandermolen

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #46 on: February 26, 2019, 01:50:08 AM »
Do this stuff count?  ;D



I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -



Definitely! Amazing! What a great thing to have.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #47 on: February 26, 2019, 02:23:21 AM »
Definitely! Amazing! What a great thing to have.
 :)
A big +1....

Great stuff, NikF. And archetypal of Raoul Dufy's work: the sailboats, the ponies, the seashells...  Wonderful!  :)
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2019, 07:10:49 AM »
Do this stuff count?  ;D



I've a few of these large format glass slides of ballet backdrop curtains and stage sets. This recent purchase is from the 1930s and by Dufy for a Ballet Russe (MkII) production called 'Beach' (or 'Palm Beach') to music by Jean Françaix.
It's needing cleaned and after I do so will look great. Think of the image quality when 35mm film is projected in a cinema, then realise this slide is about four inches long on the same side, so with the right lens (and powerful enough bulb) it'll almost appear you can step in to it - and I have lenses/bulbs meeting that description.

Here's the original design (or at least one of them) for a general idea -



Great stuff. Love Dufy’s colorful work.
"Music must be beautiful or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2019, 11:29:47 PM »
In 1922, Chilean poet Vicente Huidobro (initiator of the creationist aesthetic movement, and known to some music lovers because one of his texts was set by Edgar Varèse in his Offrandes), exhibited 13 "painted poems" in the Théâtre Édouard VII in Paris. The idea was for these works to be published using the pochoir (or stencil) technique, but the project didn't come to fruition.

In 2001, the Reina Sofía Museum here in Madrid recreated the 1922 event, and for the occasion issued the surviving works (12 in total, including some poems in two versions) in a limited edition folder of serigraphs on high-quality Arches paper, respecting the original dimensions (73 x 53 cm). I've been lucky enough to buy one set from the museum.

     
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NikF4

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #50 on: May 25, 2019, 03:32:47 PM »
In 1922, Chilean poet Vicente Huidobro (initiator of the creationist aesthetic movement, and known to some music lovers because one of his texts was set by Edgar Varèse in his Offrandes), exhibited 13 "painted poems" in the Théâtre Édouard VII in Paris. The idea was for these works to be published using the pochoir (or stencil) technique, but the project didn't come to fruition.

In 2001, the Reina Sofía Museum here in Madrid recreated the 1922 event, and for the occasion issued the surviving works (12 in total, including some poems in two versions) in a limited edition folder of serigraphs on high-quality Arches paper, respecting the original dimensions (73 x 53 cm). I've been lucky enough to buy one set from the museum.

     

Very interesting. And another name for me to check out.

NikF4

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #51 on: May 25, 2019, 03:47:15 PM »
Boxing Ballerinas by Tony McGee.





A comparison of the training and in the process finding common discipline between ballerinas and boxers in Cuba. FWIW, when I think of Cuban dancers Carlos Acosta first comes to mind, while in boxing it's the great amateur heavyweight Teofilo Stevenson - remember him? Anyway...

In my opinion the best thing about this collection of images is that the photos were shot with more than one substrate in mind and so stuff like detail, contrast, shadows/light, even perceived proportions will still be accurately reproduced, regardless. That skill is often overlooked, perhaps because many are unaware that nowadays there's less difference between a smartphone screen and a high end monitor, than there is between traditional newsprint and magazine papers. The second best thing is the svelte arse on the dancer in the second photo.

It's both unfair and of little value to compare this with with 'Danse' series shot in the 1960s by Jeanloup Sieff, but I'll do so anyway. In this instance McGee is more an observer, often composing and almost editing on the fly, whereas Sieff was (trademark burning and dodging aside) an exponent of ensuring less is more from the outset. In any case both are worth a look.

Offline JBS

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #52 on: May 25, 2019, 06:03:49 PM »
I saw this last week in the gift/book store of the Smithsonian Museum of American Art/National Portrait Gallery (technically they are two different museums who share the same building, although the galleries are intertwined and for visiting purposes they are one big museum) .  But it was too big and bulky to pack in my luggage, so I waited until I got home and ordered it off Amazon Marketplace.  It arrived in today's mail.

It is a co-publication of the Smithsonian and Yale University Press.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2019, 06:05:33 PM by JBS »

Offline ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #53 on: June 17, 2019, 05:35:49 AM »
I've been taking an interest in the work of Henri Matisse as of late. Until recently, I more or less avoided him (to the benefit of his near contemporaries Braque, Picasso, Léger et al.), and--wrongly--viewed his work as facile and decorative (while less elaborate than that of another artist of whom the same claim can be made, and I greatly admire--Raoul Dufy). I now fully recognise that Matisse's is a major, very personal, distinctive and absolutely fresh vision, and that my prejudice against him actually stemmed from my dislike of some renowned "post-Matisse" artists, who brought his style squarely into pop art territory (which I abhor) and IMO banality, than for lack of admiration for the man's own work. So, over the past several months, I've purchased these:

1)


A facsimile reprint of the 1947 edition of Beaudelaire's Les fleurs du mal, for which Matisse made 34 drawings.

 
Great to have one of my favourite collections of poetry ever illustrated by an artist my admiration for whom is growing.

2)


Another facsimile, this time of the legendary Tériade edition of Jazz (one of the most famous artist books of the 20th century). This reprint comes with the in-folio sheets loose (as the original), in a quality clothbound case. Beautiful to behold (the French edition--the case includes a small booklet with essays on the work and the artist--is significantly cheaper than the English or Italian versions).

 

3)


A very well produced and quite affordable study of Matisse's paper cutouts (the main output of his last creative phase), with additional texts by such luminaries as Tériade, Louis Aragon, Henri Michaux and Pierre Reverdy.
 
« Last Edit: June 17, 2019, 06:03:08 AM by ritter »
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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #54 on: June 17, 2019, 06:26:39 AM »

It is a co-publication of the Smithsonian and Yale University Press.

That looks magnificent!

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #55 on: June 23, 2019, 10:30:13 PM »
I bought this recently. It's rather better than similar books as it features quite detailed analyses of various works and movements:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline ritter

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Re: Artbooks and artworks you have purchased
« Reply #56 on: June 24, 2019, 12:45:39 AM »
I've been lucky enough to add to my collection of Spanish painters of the École de Paris this small pencil and watercolour on paper by Joaquín Peinado (1898-1975):



Peinado was born in Ronda (Málaga), where there now is a museum dedicated to his work. He moved to Paris in the mid-1920s, embracing what you could call a post-cubist style, which later developed into a sort of neo-Cézanneism.

He spent his summers in the mid 60s in the tiny hamlet of Cogners in the Pays de la Loire. There's some landscapes (oil on canvas) form that time in  some public collections in Spain, and then small-scale watercolours and drawings like the one I bought at auction last week (unsigned, but dated and located) depicting village life.
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