Author Topic: Your Top Five Melodists  (Read 952 times)

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Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2018, 07:55:26 AM »
Satie or Fauré or Saint-Saens....can't make up my mind which French composer I like more.

Chabrier, Lalo, Massenet?  :)

And now that I think of it, Sarasate.
Music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.. - Mozart

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2018, 07:59:26 AM »
Chabrier, Lalo, Massenet?  :)

And now that I think of it, Sarasate.

All worthy contenders.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
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Mahler, you ought to go see it.
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Offline amw

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2018, 08:03:15 AM »
I'd be curious to see what people's favourite melodies are, actually. Sometimes can be a bit hard to define what people exactly mean by that.
like, the first picks that come to my mind would include:

https://youtu.be/QXAv-NGppFw?t=1328
https://youtu.be/QXAv-NGppFw?t=1423
https://youtu.be/6p0I7dTKqeU?t=662
https://youtu.be/FrBU9u6RKio?t=78
https://youtu.be/JlMHjo7Jwhk?t=69
https://youtu.be/-Hl_zkSYVGU?t=23
https://youtu.be/h1T20eu3mMQ?t=119
https://youtu.be/ewJoB90LLDc?t=770
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZfrx7YhUNY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_uPCzXldtA
https://youtu.be/mKT5XsmMAts?t=615
https://youtu.be/QVs5EYngDno?t=178

but even just going through these I start to wonder how much I'm responding to other things like harmonic context and timbre that are inseparable from the melodic material itself. And also obviously a lot is based on what repertoire I know best.

Offline San Antone

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2018, 08:36:55 AM »
like, the first picks that come to my mind would include:

https://youtu.be/QXAv-NGppFw?t=1328
https://youtu.be/QXAv-NGppFw?t=1423
https://youtu.be/6p0I7dTKqeU?t=662
https://youtu.be/FrBU9u6RKio?t=78
https://youtu.be/JlMHjo7Jwhk?t=69
https://youtu.be/-Hl_zkSYVGU?t=23
https://youtu.be/h1T20eu3mMQ?t=119
https://youtu.be/ewJoB90LLDc?t=770
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZfrx7YhUNY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_uPCzXldtA
https://youtu.be/mKT5XsmMAts?t=615
https://youtu.be/QVs5EYngDno?t=178

but even just going through these I start to wonder how much I'm responding to other things like harmonic context and timbre that are inseparable from the melodic material itself. And also obviously a lot is based on what repertoire I know best.

Of those, the Brahms violin sonata and the Poulenc piano concerto are examples I'd choose.  Brahms is a composer known for other things than melody but when I think his works there are always really good melodies.

Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2018, 08:41:16 AM »
I had a senior moment for sure  ;D

Sarge

Two of them: you listed Elgar.

 ;) >:D
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2018, 08:44:43 AM »
Schubert
Mozart

Handel


Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2018, 08:44:55 AM »
Great list, although --- believe me or not --- I have never heard one single note of Glass.  :)

I know our Greg will forgive me this jest: If you've heard one, you've heard 'em all.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Ken B

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2018, 08:54:25 AM »
To help Florestan overcome his appalling lack ...
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pyyDvKrc58s&t=11s
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline bwv 1080

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #28 on: June 23, 2018, 09:21:33 AM »
To help Florestan overcome his appalling lack ...
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pyyDvKrc58s&t=11s

Sorry, like most of Glass, I find that trite and pedantic.  The guy is a hack compared to Riley, Reich or Adams
Cogito cogito ergo cogito sum

Offline Brian

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #29 on: June 23, 2018, 09:31:36 AM »
like, the first picks that come to my mind would include:
On mobile right now, very excited to get to a computer later and find out what all is on this list of links. The first melodies I think of immediately as my favorites are - in the order they appeared in my brain, not necessarily final order -

Schubert quintet D956, That tune in the first movement
L'embarquement pour Cythère
The Moldau
J Strauss - Roses from the South, the theme which begins the intro and returns mid-waltzing
The B theme from first movement of Tchaikovsky's Suite No 3, and the love theme from his Hamlet, and the I don't know what it's called but the gorgeous slow Adagio from Sleeping Beauty
Shostakovich fugue theme in A major, Op 87 No 7

Dvorak category: Symphony No 4, the scherzo and trio; Quintet Op 77, B theme in the scherzo; opening of Quintet Op 81; more or less the entire Dumky Trio

Amw, not sure what insight you will get from my list but I see a pattern of melodies which are in major keys but still communicate sadness or a sense of loss.

Oh, an outlier: the Love of Three Oranges march!
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 09:34:08 AM by Brian »

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #30 on: June 23, 2018, 11:58:01 AM »
Tons and tons of unforgettable melodies from these awesome composers:

Tchaikovsky
Dvorák
Saint-Saëns
Atterberg
Raff

Bonus: Braga Santos
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 11:59:41 AM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline Christo

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2018, 12:01:52 PM »
Vaughan Williams
Braga Santos
Tchaikovsky
Dvořák
Saint-Saëns
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #32 on: June 23, 2018, 12:09:53 PM »
Two of them: you listed Elgar.

 ;) >:D

 ;D :D ;D  ...great comment...and I forgive you  ;)

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Sammy

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #33 on: June 23, 2018, 12:17:37 PM »
Can someone point me to an unforgettable melody by Raff?

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #34 on: June 23, 2018, 12:54:40 PM »
Can someone point me to an unforgettable melody by Raff?

I cannot forget what I have never heard  0:)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline schnittkease

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2018, 07:14:33 PM »
Kodály and Enescu strike me as a great all-round melodists (the folk-music probably helps)
Ligeti, primarily for the tuneful piano music
Schnittke, especially in his film scores and polystylistic works

Toss-up: Borodin, Dvořák, Fauré, etc.

Oh, and Langgaard.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 07:16:19 PM by schnittkease »

Offline schnittkease

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2018, 07:18:29 PM »
Can someone point me to an unforgettable melody by Raff?



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UDA_vSWIaoU&t=1624

One of his best, I think. Symphonies 9 & 10 are also pretty 'memorable' (whatever that means).
« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 07:24:55 PM by schnittkease »

Offline Christo

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #37 on: June 23, 2018, 10:53:50 PM »
Another five:
Malcolm Arnold
Samuel Barber
Zoltán Kodály
Ottorino Respighi
Joaquín Rodrigo


… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Florestan

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #38 on: June 23, 2018, 11:40:09 PM »
A general consensus seems to emerge around Mozart, Schubert, Dvorak and Tchaikovsky.  :)
Music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.. - Mozart

Offline amw

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Re: Your Top Five Melodists
« Reply #39 on: June 24, 2018, 01:59:39 AM »
On mobile right now, very excited to get to a computer later and find out what all is on this list of links. The first melodies I think of immediately as my favorites are - in the order they appeared in my brain, not necessarily final order -

Schubert quintet D956, That tune in the first movement
L'embarquement pour Cythère
The Moldau
J Strauss - Roses from the South, the theme which begins the intro and returns mid-waltzing
The B theme from first movement of Tchaikovsky's Suite No 3, and the love theme from his Hamlet, and the I don't know what it's called but the gorgeous slow Adagio from Sleeping Beauty
Shostakovich fugue theme in A major, Op 87 No 7

Dvorak category: Symphony No 4, the scherzo and trio; Quintet Op 77, B theme in the scherzo; opening of Quintet Op 81; more or less the entire Dumky Trio

Amw, not sure what insight you will get from my list but I see a pattern of melodies which are in major keys but still communicate sadness or a sense of loss.
I think we all have different things we look for. Most of my choices seem to be in triple time (3/4, or 3/8, or 6/8 or 6/4 etc). That said we also seem to agree on the Schubert and Tchaikovsky choices....

Of those, the Brahms violin sonata and the Poulenc piano concerto are examples I'd choose.  Brahms is a composer known for other things than melody but when I think his works there are always really good melodies.
Honestly Brahms should be on my list in general. He could write a tune when he put his mind to it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j74III4mmds
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tt3leotWcw8
https://youtu.be/r6fnrHigxRE?t=1015
https://youtu.be/rwM5jYT-64s?t=55
https://youtu.be/w_-fIWfrlvo?t=908