Author Topic: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!  (Read 19788 times)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« on: April 13, 2007, 06:18:40 PM »
I have been absolutely amazed at the number of composers writing excellent music in the period beginning around mid-18th century into the early 19th century (i.e. about the time of Beethoven's death, 1827).  In a recent thread on Favorite Period of Music, I had spent some time putting together a listing of composers from this era (+ an additional list of a number of these composers w/ their own threads on our previous forum); I believe that these composers (and others to be added) deserved their own thread before this list is 'disappears' in the more general thread -  :)

Now, I'm speaking of those composers of lesser fame, so Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven,  & Schubert (all of whom have separate & often multiple threads) are not the topic of this thread.  Thus, I'm re-printing the list from the previous thread (and the list w/ the links) - I hope this thread will provide an area to discuss these many 'other' obscure, less known (or yet to be discovered) composers from this era; of course, many deserve their own threads (some of which already exist).   :D

Abel, Carl Friedrich (1723 - 1787)*
Albrechtsberger, Johann Georg (1736 - 1809)
Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel (1714 - 1788)**
Bach, Johann Christian (1735 - 1782)**
Beck, Franz Ignaz (1734-1809)*
Beethoven, Ludwig van (1770-1827)**
Benda, Frans & Georg (1709-86; 1722-95)
Blavet, Michel (1700-1768)*
Boccherini, Luigi (1743-1805)**
Boyce, William (1711-1779)**
Cambini, Giuseppe Maria (1746 - 1825)
Cannabich, Christian (1731 - 1798)
Cartellieri, Antonio (1772- 1807)**
Carulli, Ferdinando (1770 - 1841)*
Cherubini, Luigi (1760 - 1842)*
Cimarosa, Domenico (1749 - 1801)
Clementi, Muzio (1752 - 1832)**
Cramer, Johann Baptist (1771 - 1858)*
Crusell, Bernhard Henrik (1775 - 1838)**
Danzi, Franz (1763 - 1826)**
Dittersdorf, Carl Ditters von (1739 - 1799)**
Dussek, Jan Ladislav (1760 - 1812)**
Field, John (1782- 1837)**
Galuppi, Baldassare (1706 - 1785)*
Gambaro, Vincent (1785- 1824)*
Giuliani, Mauro (1781- 1829)**
Gluck, Christoph Willibald (1714 - 1787)
Gossec, Francois-Joseph (1734 - 1829)*
Hasse, Johann (1699- 1783)*
Haydn, Franz Joseph (1732 - 1809)**
Haydn, Michael (1737 - 1806)*
Hoffmann, Leopold (1738 - 1793)**
Hoffmeister, Franz Anton (1754 - 1812)*
Holzbauer, Ignaz (1711- 1783)*
Hummel, Johann (1778- 1837)**
Kleinknecht, Jakob (1722- 1794)*
Kraus, Joseph Martin (1756 - 1792)**
Kreutzer, Conradin (1780 - 1849)**
Kreutzer, Rodolphe (1766- 1831)*
Krommer, Franz (1759 - 1831)**
Kuhlau, Friedrich (1786 - 1832)**
Leclair, Jean-Marie (1697- 1764)**
Locatelli, Pietro (1695- 1764)**
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus (1756 - 1791)**
Myslivecek, Josef (1737- 1781)*
Onslow, Georges (1785- 1853)**
Ordonez, Karl von (1734 - 1786)
Paisiello, Giovanni (1740 - 1816)
Pichl, Vaclav (1741- 1805)*
Pleyel, Ignaz Joseph (1757 - 1831)**
Quantz, Johann Joachim (1697 - 1773) **
Reicha, Anton (1770 - 1836)**
Ries, Ferdinand (1784 - 1838)**
Rosetti, Antonio (1750- 1792)**
Ryba, Jakub Jan (1765 - 1815)
Salieri, Antonio (1750 - 1825)
Sammartini, Giovanni Battista (1700 - 1775)
Schubert, Franz (1797 - 1828)**
Soler, Antonio (1729 - 1783)*
Sor, Fernando (1778 - 1839)*
Sperger, Johannes Matthias (1750 - 1812)
Spohr, Louis (1784 - 1859)**
Stamitz, Carl (1745 - 1801)**
Stamitz, Johann (1717 - 1757)
Tartini, Giuseppe (1692 - 1770)**
Vanhal, Johann Baptist (1739 - 1813)**
Viotti, Giovanni Battista (1755 - 1824)
Wagenseil, Georg Christoph (1715 - 1777)
Weber, Carl Maria von (1786 - 1826)**
Wolf, Ernst Wilhelm (1735 - 1792)*
Wranitzky, Anton (1761 - 1820)
« Last Edit: May 24, 2007, 04:55:27 PM by SonicMan »

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2007, 06:23:23 PM »
As a continuation, below is a shorter list of composers in this category that have had 'separate' threads in our older GMG forum - just click on the names to the right of each composer, if interested; also, feel free to start/continue a new post in our present forum.   :D

Abel, Carl Friedrich (1723 - 1787)  Abel
Boccherini, Luigi (1743-1805) Boccherini
Cartellieri, Antonio (1772- 1807) Cartellieri
Cherubini, Luigi (1760 - 1842) Cherubini
Clementi, Muzio (1752 - 1832) Clementi
Dittersdorf, Carl Ditters von (1739 - 1799) Dittersdorf
Dussek, Jan Ladislav (1760 - 1812) Dussek
Field, John (1782- 1837) Field
Hasse, Johann (1699- 1783) Hasse
Haydn, Franz Joseph (1732 - 1809) Haydn
Hoffmann, Leopold (1738 - 1793) Hoffmann
Holzbauer, Ignaz (1711- 1783) Holzbauer
Hummel, Johann (1778- 1837) Hummel
Kraus, Joseph Martin (1756 - 1792) Kraus
Krommer, Franz (1759 - 1831) Krommer
Locatelli, Pietro (1695- 1764) Locatelli
Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus (1756 - 1791) Mozart
Onslow, Georges (1785- 1853) Onslow
Pichl, Vaclav (1741- 1805) Pichl
Pleyel, Ignaz Joseph (1757 - 1831) Pleyel
Quantz, Johann Joachim (1697 - 1773) Quantz
Reicha, Anton (1770 - 1836) Reicha
Ries, Ferdinand (1784 - 1838) Ries
Rosetti, Antonio (1750- 1792) Rosetti
Salieri, Antonio (1750 - 1825) Salieri
Spohr, Louis (1784 - 1859) Spohr
Stamitz, Carl (1745 - 1801) Stamitz
Vanhal, Johann Baptist (1739 - 1813)  Vanhal
Viotti, Giovanni Battista (1755 - 1824) Viotti

Mark G. Simon

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2007, 12:55:10 PM »
I really enjoy the symphonies of Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732-1795). Only 7 of his 20 symphonies survived World War II, but the ones that remain are fully as good as anything in early to middle period Haydn. There's one late symphony, which sounds roughly comparable to Haydn's Paris symphonies in style.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2007, 01:45:34 PM »
I really enjoy the symphonies of Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732-1795). Only 7 of his 20 symphonies survived World War II, but the ones that remain are fully as good as anything in early to middle period Haydn. There's one late symphony, which sounds roughly comparable to Haydn's Paris symphonies in style.

Mark - thanks for the addition; JCF Bach was born the same year as Haydn; I have a lot of CDs of his two 'more famous' brothers, CPE & JC Bach - need to explore those symphonies!  :)

Some more additions to this musical period below (carried over from the other thread + some from Harry!):

Backofen, Georg (1768-1830) - excellent CPO disc of Clarinet Concs. w/ Dieter Klocker
Brandl, Johann (1760-1837) - Bassoon & Piano Quintets; couple discs on MDG label
Giardini, Felice (1716-1796) - 3-CD String Trios on Hungaroton (31837-39)
Romberg, Andreas (1767-1821) - String Quartets, Vol. 2) on MDG (307 1026-2)
Stanley, John (1712-1786) - Six Concertos, Seven Parts on Hyperion (Goodman & Parley)

Offline Bogey

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2007, 01:47:59 PM »
Dave,
I believe that you should be appointed the "archivist" of the old GMG....well done.
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Offline Que

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2007, 08:58:34 PM »
Dave,
I believe that you should be appointed the "archivist" of the old GMG....well done.

Seconded. Splendid work Dave! :)

Q

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2007, 05:24:52 AM »
Bill & Q - hey, thanks!  ::)   But these guys (and a few gals) keep 'emerging' from the wookwork - or is Harry in there 'digging them out'?  ;D  I believe 4 of the 5 on my last 'short' list were posted by him, so I'm sure there will be more to come!  Dave

Offline Ten thumbs

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2007, 11:14:22 AM »
One important omission from your list who should not be overlooked:
V. J. Tomášek (1774 - 1850)
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2007, 02:25:23 AM »
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact. --Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Offline JoshLilly

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2007, 10:02:14 AM »
My favourite time period in music, my specialty! Except for Blavet, I have multiple pieces of music in my collection by every single name mentioned on this thread so far. And yes, I recently bought a new Tomášek CD with two of his piano concerti on it, my first exposure to this composer (other than his name and sketchy biographical stuff).

For anyone maybe wanting to find something new and interesting from this time period, but find the number of names a bit overwhelming, I have over time found a few pieces that I believe would be more popular if more widely known. Even people who aren't as much into music of this time period often like these pieces quite a bit:


Méhul: Symphony #2 in D. Recommended recording: Nimbus Records, Lisbon Gulbenkian Foundation Orchestra conducted by Michel Swierczewski. Very interesting, from the opening seconds. Got a nice opening to it. Most everyone knows Beethoven, but here's a good glimpse into the world that heavily influenced him: Revolution-era French composers. Some people prefer his 3rd symphony, but for some reason I've found this one strikes a chord with more people.
Hummel: Piano Concerto #2 in A minor, Op.85. Piano Concerto #3 in B minor, Op.89. Recommended recording: Chandos, English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Bryden Thomson, with Stephen Hough at the piano. Hop on over here and check out the brief samples: http://tinyurl.com/yvlmje  (Note, I have nothing to do with amazon, nor am I trying to endorse them or sell for them). The lyrical theme from the first movement of the B minor is not to be heard in the 1 minute sample, but it's to die for.
Clementi: Symphony #1 (#7?) in C, WoO32. Recommended recording: Chandos, London Mozart Players conducted by Matthias Bamert (Contemporaries of Mozart series). The main body of the first movement is just astonishing. This is some unreal orchestration, and coming from a composer known today almost entirely for his piano practice pieces. Not to mention, the main theme to the first movement is catchy, high-impact, and even a little rough. If you don't have really good sound, you're going to miss out, the orchestration is rich and intricate, there's so much going on. I just wish Bamert and the LMP would record his other surviving symphonies, especially the other "big" ones! You can find at least 2 complete sets of the ones that are still with us, but neither completely satisfies.
Kraus: Symphony in C, VB138 Violin obligato. Recommended recording: Naxos, Swedish Chamber Orchestra conducted by Petter Sundkvist. The main theme to the first movement will float around in your head for the rest of your life, so be warned. I have a hard time singling out any Kraus symphony. This recording I mention is Vol.2 from Naxos of his symphonies, but I'd honestly recommend Vol.1 first. But this symphony is just something else. Kraus is a real find.
John Field: Piano Concerto #2 in A-Flat, H.31. Recommended recording: Naxos, Northern Sinfonia of England conducted by David Haslam; pianist is Benjamin Frith. Lyrical beauty abounds here. The first two movements of this piece are so gorgeous. But don't get too mellow and comfortable, just listen to the bizarre entry of the piano after the orchestral introduction. I admit that I've heard that effect done more interestingly, but it was from an old LP recording of horrible sound quality. Right now, bang for your buck, I think this Naxos disc is a great bargain. If you haven't melted by the end of the first movement, the 2nd is maybe even more beautiful and lyrical. Field was more than just the father of the Nocturne and a huge influence on Chopin; I think this piece would probably get live concert time, were it more well known.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2007, 02:32:20 PM »
Thanks all for the additions to this ever expanding list - just received a BRO order, in part looking for some MORE of these composers, so below are another half dozen (some are on the original list, but except for 1 CD of Romberg's music, these are all new recordings to me):

Georg Benda (1722-1705) - Sinfornias, Nos. 7-12; Naxos (8.553409)

Johann Gottlieb Graun (1702-1771) - Sinfonia + Violin & Viola Concs.; CPO (999 887-2)

Adalbert Gyrowetz (1763-1850) - String Quartets, Op. 44); Hyperion (67109)

Martin Joseph Mengal (1784-1851) - Wind Quintets; New Classical Adventure (60138-310)

Giovanni Paisiello (1741-1816) - Sinfonia, Overture, & Piano Concs.; Naxos (8.557031)

Andreas Romberg (1767-1821) - Flute Quintets; Naxos (8.554765)

I've not listened to most of these recordings yet, but am currently sampling the Mengal Wind Quintets - on a label not familiar to me (but seems to be devoted to this period & the use of 'authentic' instruments); this is a 2-CD set (but the 2nd disc is only 36") - performed by the Das Reicha'sche Quintett which includes a flute, oboe, clarinet, horn, & bassoon - all based on instruments of the time, including a 'natural' horn.  Mengal was Flemish & a horn player; his composition teacher was Reicha (thus, the wind chamber interest, in part).  These Wind Quintets are 'after' Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, & Rossini, and appear to be adapted from movements of works by these more 'famous' composers (the liner notes are quite interesting); the instruments are well integrated, more like string writing, performances well done, and good sound recording (would like to hear more from this label).  The 2-CD set below (left) w/ a 'real' picture of the composer; pic on right probably not him, but CLICK on image for a short bio -  :D

 

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2007, 02:59:16 PM »
My favourite time period in music, my specialty! Except for Blavet, I have multiple pieces of music in my collection by every single name mentioned on this thread so far. And yes, I recently bought a new Tomášek CD with two of his piano concerti on it, my first exposure to this composer (other than his name and sketchy biographical stuff).

For anyone maybe wanting to find something new and interesting from this time period, but find the number of names a bit overwhelming, I have over time found a few pieces that I believe would be more popular if more widely known. Even people who aren't as much into music of this time period often like these pieces quite a bit:


Méhul: Symphony #2 in D. Recommended recording: Nimbus Records, Lisbon Gulbenkian Foundation Orchestra conducted by Michel Swierczewski. Very interesting, from the opening seconds. Got a nice opening to it. Most everyone knows Beethoven, but here's a good glimpse into the world that heavily influenced him: Revolution-era French composers. Some people prefer his 3rd symphony, but for some reason I've found this one strikes a chord with more people.
Hummel: Piano Concerto #2 in A minor, Op.85. Piano Concerto #3 in B minor, Op.89. Recommended recording: Chandos, English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Bryden Thomson, with Stephen Hough at the piano. Hop on over here and check out the brief samples: http://tinyurl.com/yvlmje  (Note, I have nothing to do with amazon, nor am I trying to endorse them or sell for them). The lyrical theme from the first movement of the B minor is not to be heard in the 1 minute sample, but it's to die for.
Clementi: Symphony #1 (#7?) in C, WoO32. Recommended recording: Chandos, London Mozart Players conducted by Matthias Bamert (Contemporaries of Mozart series). The main body of the first movement is just astonishing. This is some unreal orchestration, and coming from a composer known today almost entirely for his piano practice pieces. Not to mention, the main theme to the first movement is catchy, high-impact, and even a little rough. If you don't have really good sound, you're going to miss out, the orchestration is rich and intricate, there's so much going on. I just wish Bamert and the LMP would record his other surviving symphonies, especially the other "big" ones! You can find at least 2 complete sets of the ones that are still with us, but neither completely satisfies.
Kraus: Symphony in C, VB138 Violin obligato. Recommended recording: Naxos, Swedish Chamber Orchestra conducted by Petter Sundkvist. The main theme to the first movement will float around in your head for the rest of your life, so be warned. I have a hard time singling out any Kraus symphony. This recording I mention is Vol.2 from Naxos of his symphonies, but I'd honestly recommend Vol.1 first. But this symphony is just something else. Kraus is a real find.
John Field: Piano Concerto #2 in A-Flat, H.31. Recommended recording: Naxos, Northern Sinfonia of England conducted by David Haslam; pianist is Benjamin Frith. Lyrical beauty abounds here. The first two movements of this piece are so gorgeous. But don't get too mellow and comfortable, just listen to the bizarre entry of the piano after the orchestral introduction. I admit that I've heard that effect done more interestingly, but it was from an old LP recording of horrible sound quality. Right now, bang for your buck, I think this Naxos disc is a great bargain. If you haven't melted by the end of the first movement, the 2nd is maybe even more beautiful and lyrical. Field was more than just the father of the Nocturne and a huge influence on Chopin; I think this piece would probably get live concert time, were it more well known.

Josh,
My favorite period too! I have every recording you listed, they are all excellent, good choices for a potential explorer. Glad you joined us here, Sonic has given us a very nice start to this time period. :)

Sonic,
That's a nice haul you just made. I particularly enjoy the Gyrowetz SQ's and the Paisiello orchestral works. 2 names that I really need to look into are Romberg (who I only know as a cellist friend of Beethoven), and Mengal. I'll be popping right over to BRO to see if you've already snapped up the only copy of that disk. :-\

A name I didn't see at a glance in your list was Johann August Just (1750-1791). I picked up 6 of his fortepiano trios (Op 13) at BRO not long ago and found them to be very nicely constructed and entertaining, as well as being well-played on this disk (Walsingham Classics).

And a couple other names that ARE on your list, but always seem to get slighted: Ignaz Pleyel and Carl Stamitz. Anyone who hasn't heard anything by these two is well-served to give them a try. As a quick rec, the Chandos "Contemporaries of Mozart" series, usually with the London Mozart Players / Bamert is always a good choice. With these two composers, it will be one disk each of their symphonies, and that's a good place to start. :)

8)
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2007, 04:03:48 PM »
Sonic,
That's a nice haul you just made. I particularly enjoy the Gyrowetz SQ's and the Paisiello orchestral works. 2 names that I really need to look into are Romberg (who I only know as a cellist friend of Beethoven), and Mengal. I'll be popping right over to BRO to see if you've already snapped up the only copy of that disk. :-\

A name I didn't see at a glance in your list was Johann August Just (1750-1791). I picked up 6 of his fortepiano trios (Op 13) at BRO not long ago and found them to be very nicely constructed and entertaining, as well as being well-played on this disk (Walsingham Classics).

And a couple other names that ARE on your list, but always seem to get slighted: Ignaz Pleyel and Carl Stamitz. Anyone who hasn't heard anything by these two is well-served to give them a try. As a quick rec, the Chandos "Contemporaries of Mozart" series, usually with the London Mozart Players / Bamert is always a good choice. With these two composers, it will be one disk each of their symphonies, and that's a good place to start. :)


Gurn - thanks for your input & great comments; those Mengal Wind Quintets are interesting & even w/ a 'natural' horn! HIP! Not sure exactly if these works are transcriptions but are based on piano & violin chamber works of the composers mentioned - 'buy in' price is certainly cheap from BRO.  I was listening to the SQs of Gyrowetz before dinner (did not get through the three) - apparently Haydn was his 'hero' so quite good - guy lived into his late '80s, so I'm sure there may be other works of his to explore!

I agree w/ you completely on Ignaz Pleyel & Carl Stamitz - own a number of their recordings and certainly can recommend a listening.  Of course, this list will continue to expand! Believe that I've already added 10+ more composers myself, and have not even explored a few others.  BOY, you know w/o modern day electronics, musical entertainment back then had to be 'live' and 'new' - can't even imagine how many people were employed at various levels to provide music to the populace, the church, and the royalty; so much more to be explored, discovered, and yet recorded - exciting, hey -  :D

Offline Brian

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2007, 05:57:54 PM »
Great Stamitz disc of "orchestral quartets" with Naxos, and the gorgeous cello concerti on another Naxos CD!

I have also enjoyed the piano concerti of Ferdinand Ries and the symphonies of Johann Wenzel Kalliwoda, though they hit their peaks just after Beethoven died so I guess they don't count. :)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #14 on: April 21, 2007, 05:14:16 PM »
Thanks all for the additions to this ever expanding list - just received a BRO order, in part looking for some MORE of these composers, so below are another half dozen (some are on the original list, but except for 1 CD of Romberg's music, these are all new recordings to me):

Georg Benda (1722-1705) - Sinfornias, Nos. 7-12; Naxos (8.553409)

Johann Gottlieb Graun (1702-1771) - Sinfonia + Violin & Viola Concs.; CPO (999 887-2)

Giovanni Paisiello (1741-1816) - Sinfonia, Overture, & Piano Concs.; Naxos (8.557031)

Well, just getting around to listening to the above composers listed in my previous post - so many of these guys seemed to be in orchestras of the times, and many composed!  The numbers of their compositions is astounding - how many lost?  How many to be re-discovered?  How many are good by whose definition?

Paisiello Piano Concertos - apparently an opera composer who wrote a number of keyboard concertos, only two of which are on this Naxos disc - good review here - would be interested in others' comments?  :)

Graun - apparently a 'Brothers act' in Frederick 'The Great's' musical orchestra, which contained some great performers & composers, e.g. the Graun Bros, Quantz (the flute teacher of Frederick), a Benda, and CPE Bach - boy, what a combination - great musicians plus so many compositions, many yet to be discoved (if possible?).

Benda - an apparently 'amazing' long-lived generation of musicians-composers extending back into the 17th century to the present (in fact, the conductor of the orchestra, i.e. Christian Brenda, is a continuation of this familial tradition); these are 'short' Sinfonias in the late Baroque style; well played and quite enjoyable.

What amazes me about reading the insert notes on many of these composers is that they wrote dozens of these works, symphonies, concertos, etc. - not saying that these may be 'great' compositions, but just the thought of the manuscripts being found & the works recorded is still thrilling (at least to me) -  :D

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2007, 06:09:03 PM »
Sonic,
Well, in many cases, the manuscripts aren't even lost!  In "Mozart's Symphonies", Neal Zaslaw, the editor in chief of the Neue Mozart Ausgabe (the new Köchel, actually) says that while he was going through manuscripts in Vienna looking for Mozart stuff hiding in the cracks, there were "thousands" of symphonies still in manuscript from that era that he went through. :o   And they are still there.

Also (as an example), note in the liner notes on the Brandl Bassoon Quintets (not the piano ones), that the bassoonist actually worked from the manuscript to make a playable score and had it printed so they could play them. If he hadn't done, those works would still be unheard too!

The things we haven't heard are no less likely to be very good than the things we have heard. It's just that no one has got around to doing anything about it yet.  :'(

8)

PS - I really like that Benda disk, and the Paisiello too. That concerto in g, the #4, is a peach! :)
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2007, 06:27:22 PM »
..........................
PS - I really like that Benda disk, and the Paisiello too. That concerto in g, the #4, is a peach! :)

Gurn - thanks for the great comments - completely agree that the 'works' not recorded are goin' to be just as enjoyable (if not more) than those we've already heard from these composers of this era - will look more into the Benda Family & Paiseillo, the Benda's first 6 'Sinfonias' should be just as enjoyable as his 7-12! -  :)

Offline Bogey

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2007, 04:36:08 AM »
Dave,

Might we also add William Boyce to this list? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Boyce

I have his Eight Symphonies (Thomas/Bournemouth Sinfonietta-CRD Records Ltd) and just love them.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=41045
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #18 on: April 22, 2007, 07:10:30 AM »
Dave,

Might we also add William Boyce to this list? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Boyce

I have his Eight Symphonies (Thomas/Bournemouth Sinfonietta-CRD Records Ltd) and just love them.

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=41045

Bill - he's already on the list in the OP, but thanks for the bio information and the CD recommendation; for those not knowing William Boyce, I own another set of the same symphonies, Hogwood w/ Acad Anc Music & Trio Sonatas, 2-CD set on Hyperion w/ Peter Holman & the Parley of Instruments Baroque Orch; would love to hear about alternate or other suggestions -  :)  Dave

 

Offline Bogey

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Re: Classic-Early Romantic Composers - A Cornucopia!
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2007, 07:21:07 AM »
Bill - he's already on the list in the OP, but thanks for the bio information and the CD recommendation; for those not knowing William Boyce, I own another set of the same symphonies, Hogwood w/ Acad Anc Music & Trio Sonatas, 2-CD set on Hyperion w/ Peter Holman & the Parley of Instruments Baroque Orch; would love to hear about alternate or other suggestions -  :)  Dave

 

Sorry about that Dave....might help if I read more carefully.  ;D:)  What are the sonatas like?
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

 

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