Author Topic: Squarcialupi!  (Read 449 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Squarcialupi!
« on: November 06, 2018, 02:57:52 AM »
A thread devoted to recordings of composers who are mentioned in the The Squarcialupi Codex, including amongst others

Francesco Landini,
Bartolino da Padova
Niccolò da Perugia
Andrea da Firenze
Jacopo da Bologna
Lorenzo da Firenze
Gherardello da Firenze
Donato da Cascia
Giovanni da Cascia
Vincenzo da Rimini
Paolo da Firenze
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Offline 71 dB

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2018, 04:55:08 AM »
Another thread that made me feel stupid, uneducated and ignorant. I had to Google The Squarcialupi Codex:-\
I have never been that much into pre-baroque music and the composers listed are unknown to me.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2018, 05:13:28 AM »
<a href="https://youtube.com/v/sFgBb8gRLbE" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/sFgBb8gRLbE</a>

I’ve found three recordings of Paolo de Firenze’s madrigal Lena Virtù: Mala Punica, ClubMedieval and a live one from Tetraktys from Utrecht in 2013 on YouTube. All  three set for two voices and different quantities of instruments. The reason I want to mention it is, to my ears, it shows the absolute superiority of Mala Punica, and for an interesting reason: their musicians, especially the singers,  are listening to each other, responding, and that makes the music come to life. Tetraktys aren’t bad, but they really don’t really touch Mala Punica.

At least, that’s how I hear it.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 05:18:31 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline amw

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2018, 05:56:21 AM »
Honestly I've always been kind of curious as to what the hell happened to Italian music between Landini and Palestrina. It seems the entire peninsula sort of slept through the great flowering of Franco-Flemish-English-Burgundian polyphony until the late Renaissance. I've heard some of the names associated with this codex, but they're not much more than just names right now. (except Landini himself obviously.)

Offline JBS

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2018, 08:09:10 AM »
A thread devoted to recordings of composers who are mentioned in the The Squarcialupi Codex, including amongst others

Francesco Landini,
Bartolino da Padova
Niccolò da Perugia
Andrea da Firenze
Jacopo da Bologna
Lorenzo da Firenze
Gherardello da Firenze
Donato da Cascia
Giovanni da Cascia
Vincenzo da Rimini
Paolo da Firenze

Where there any recognized schools/teacher-student relationships/family relationships?  There are four Florentine composers in that list.  That may be simply result from the fact that the Codex is Florentine itself, but presumably at least some of the four knew each other?  And then two musicians from Cascia.  Do we know anything about possible relationships there.

There is Marco dall'Aquila from approximately a century after the Codex, whom I know of from a CD by Paul O'Dette
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=dp_byline_sr_music_2?ie=UTF8&field-artist=Dall%27Aquila&search-alias=music


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Online (: premont :)

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2018, 10:23:09 AM »
Another thread that made me feel stupid, uneducated and ignorant. I had to Google The Squarcialupi Codex:-\
I have never been that much into pre-baroque music and the composers listed are unknown to me.

It is no shame to be ignorant of the Squarcialupi Codex. Very few, other than especially interested people, know it. We can not all of us know everything about everything.
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heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2018, 02:21:04 PM »
Another thread that made me feel stupid, uneducated and ignorant. I had to Google The Squarcialupi Codex:-\
I have never been that much into pre-baroque music and the composers listed are unknown to me.

Premont's right. It's very obscure.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2018, 02:30:33 PM »


Jacopo da Bologna's madrigal Un bel sparver only has one recorded performance that I know of, by La Reverdie. What's interesting is that this music was singled out by musicologists in the 1930s as a prime example of something totally unsingable because the melismas are so extravagant. People thought it might be for organ, or someone singing syllabically and a viol. Listening to it now a cappella  it sounds absolutely like normal music to me! I'm acclimatised.

By the way, I'm getting this type of information about historical views about interpretation of early music from Daniel Leech Wilkinson's The Modern Invention of Medieval Music (Cambridge), which I think is rather good.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2018, 02:35:34 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2018, 09:17:49 AM »
Honestly I've always been kind of curious as to what the hell happened to Italian music between Landini and Palestrina. It seems the entire peninsula sort of slept through the great flowering of Franco-Flemish-English-Burgundian polyphony until the late Renaissance. I've heard some of the names associated with this codex, but they're not much more than just names right now. (except Landini himself obviously.)

And it’s not clear to me what happens to French music after Machaut. There’s a well regarded book on this, Nadas and Cuthbert Ars nova: French and Italian Music in the Fourteenth Century , it’s too expensive for me I think.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 09:21:53 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2018, 10:40:56 AM »
In extraordinary "deeply felt" performance of Giovanni da Cascia's Io son un pelegrin by Max Meili here (track 2)

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k1273889.media


Wide vibrato in the voice, less so in the viol.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 10:44:05 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Squarcialupi!
« Reply #10 on: November 20, 2018, 01:44:07 PM »



This recording dedicated to music from Squarcialupi is in a style which is the polar opposite of the of the style of many singers of small scale medieval music, like Gothic Voices and The Orlando Consort. Tempos are relaxed and there’s a great feeling of space, of the music respiring. They allow is to savour the harmonies, smell the roses. The singing is sensual and expressive, at times almost dramatic. The words matter for these musicians. I like the singers very much, for me it’s hard to stop listening once I start.

There’s a new wave in early music, what I think of the instrutruments revival, and Tetraktys along with Mala Punica are at the vanguard. They are both developing a really fluid style, much more so than previous voice and instrument approaches I think. Having said that I think that Jill Feldman is one of the few singers in this area I’ve heard who could pull off a solo song, she’s that good.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 01:53:16 PM by Mandryka »
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