Author Topic: Your Top 5 Enescu Works  (Read 532 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« on: March 18, 2019, 08:52:24 PM »


Enescu would like to know what are your ‘Top 5 Favorite Works’ of his? I’ll post my list later on.
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Offline springrite

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2019, 08:58:44 PM »
Oedipe
Octet
Symphonie Concertante for Cello and Orchestra
Cello Sonata, opus 26
Violin Sonata #3

(More or less in that order)
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2019, 09:02:58 PM »
Oedipe
Octet
Symphonie Concertante for Cello and Orchestra
Cello Sonata, opus 26
Violin Sonata #3

(More or less in that order)

Very nice list, but which Cello Sonata? He assigned the opus number of 26 to both works with the distinction of 26/1 being the first one and 26/2 being the second one. Interestingly enough, these particular works weren’t even published until 1935 (I believe? --- I could have the date wrong).
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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2019, 09:03:52 PM »
Very nice list, but which Cello Sonata? He assigned the opus number of 26 to both works with the distinction of 26/1 being the first one and 26/2 being the second one. Interestingly enough, these particular works weren’t even published until 1935 (I believe? --- I could have the date wrong).
The one I have listened to more is the #1.
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2019, 09:13:58 PM »
I'm not terribly familiar with Enescu, but I do enjoy some works of his such as:

Octet
Study Symphony No. 1
Study Symphony No. 4
Violin sonata No. 3
Romanian Rhapsodies Op. 11

I remember liking the proper symphonies, but I don't have strong memories from them, so I don't include them.

Offline ritter

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2019, 11:54:49 PM »
My two cents worth... :)

Ordered by opus number:
String Quartet No. 2, op. 22/2
Oedipe, op. 23
Piano Sonata No. 3, op. 24/3
Piano Quintet op. 29
Chamber Symphony op. 33

Honourable mention: Orchestral Suite No. 3, “Villageoise”, op. 27

All these pieces are post-1930...it’s clear it’s the “mature” Enesco that I really admire...
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 12:31:07 AM by ritter »
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Offline Daverz

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2019, 01:31:13 AM »
Romanian Rhapsodies (I'll pick No. 2 because it's less played)
Symphony No. 1 (particularly fond of this one)
Symphony No. 3
Violin Sonata No. 3
Suite No. 3
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 01:56:20 AM by Daverz »

Offline Jo498

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2019, 02:16:55 AM »
for now only two, it's been a while that I listened to symphonies, suites or chamber music and I can't claim to know his music well although I probably have heard most of the better known instrumental pieces at some stage.

Dixtuor, one the most attraktive works for somewhat larger sized woodwind ensemble
3rd violin sonata

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Offline amw

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2019, 03:53:06 AM »
Piano sonata no.3
Decet
Chamber Symphony
Impressions d’enfance
Violin sonata no.3

off the top of my head

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2019, 06:17:39 AM »
My two cents worth... :)

Ordered by opus number:
String Quartet No. 2, op. 22/2
Oedipe, op. 23
Piano Sonata No. 3, op. 24/3
Piano Quintet op. 29
Chamber Symphony op. 33

Honourable mention: Orchestral Suite No. 3, “Villageoise”, op. 27

All these pieces are post-1930...it’s clear it’s the “mature” Enesco that I really admire...

Great list, Rafael. 8) I knew I could count on you. The only work on your list that I don’t really enjoy is String Quartet No. 2, Op. 22/2 and this is mainly because I find it’s musical language to be acerbic and harsh in a way that it makes the music unappealing to me. There’s just no access points, but, IIRC, the last movement was quite good.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2019, 06:18:05 AM »
The one I have listened to more is the #1.

Ah, okay. Cool, Paul. 8)
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #11 on: March 19, 2019, 06:25:15 AM »
I suppose it’s time for me to make a list (in no particular order):

Cello Sonata in C major, Op. 26/2
Oedipe, Op. 23
Piano Suite No. 3, “Pièces impromptues”, Op. 18
Piano Quintet in A minor, Op. 29
Vox maris, Op. 31


*List is subject to change as there are many other works that I could put in a ‘Top 5’, but right now, I feel these current choices best reflect my taste.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 06:28:23 AM by Mirror Image »
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline ritter

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #12 on: March 19, 2019, 11:53:22 AM »
Great list, Rafael. 8) I knew I could count on you. The only work on your list that I don’t really enjoy is String Quartet No. 2, Op. 22/2 and this is mainly because I find it’s musical language to be acerbic and harsh in a way that it makes the music unappealing to me. There’s just no access points, but, IIRC, the last movement was quite good.
Yes, that 2nd SQ is quite lean and ascetic, and that may be part of its appeal to me. But what I really admire in this piece is something that many would regard as a minor issue, but for me is simply magical: at the end of the third movement, the quartet repeatedly plays a 5 note theme, in a way that appears devoid of direction and is “transitional”. Then, this same theme becomes the main material of the con moto initial section of the final movement. It’s this transition that I find breathtaking.

Enescu does a similar thing in the Piano Quintet, with a rising crescendo, in which the piano plays these almost abstract meandering figures, and which leads into the last section of the piece, where the theme that’s only hesitantly appeared in the  transition that has preceded it is now stated triumphantly.

Other composers have done similar things (these transitions, I mean), and they are for me highlights of their respective works. The first example of course is the transition between the last two movements of Beethoven’s  Fifth. There’s also a small orchestral passsage in the fourth scene of Wagner’s Rheingold (after Wotan’s “Gönn ihm die geifernde Lust” and before Loge’s “Fasolt und Fafner nahen von fern”), IMHO clearly inspired by Beethoven. And then,  Debussy was a master at this: the transition between the Danse sacrée and the Danse profane, and, of course, the segment connecting “Les parfums de la nuit” and “Le matin d'un jour de fête” in Ibéria. Boulez’s Pli selon pli also has several moments like this.

It’s as if the music suddenly found itself in a sort of no man’s land, became static, and lost any sense of space and time...I can’t describe it better.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2019, 12:30:17 PM by ritter »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2019, 06:53:59 PM »
Yes, that 2nd SQ is quite lean and ascetic, and that may be part of its appeal to me. But what I really admire in this piece is something that many would regard as a minor issue, but for me is simply magical: at the end of the third movement, the quartet repeatedly plays a 5 note theme, in a way that appears devoid of direction and is “transitional”. Then, this same theme becomes the main material of the con moto initial section of the final movement. It’s this transition that I find breathtaking.

Enescu does a similar thing in the Piano Quintet, with a rising crescendo, in which the piano plays these almost abstract meandering figures, and which leads into the last section of the piece, where the theme that’s only hesitantly appeared in the  transition that has preceded it is now stated triumphantly.

Other composers have done similar things (these transitions, I mean), and they are for me highlights of their respective works. The first example of course is the transition between the last two movements of Beethoven’s  Fifth. There’s also a small orchestral passsage in the fourth scene of Wagner’s Rheingold (after Wotan’s “Gönn ihm die geifernde Lust” and before Loge’s “Fasolt und Fafner nahen von fern”), IMHO clearly inspired by Beethoven. And then,  Debussy was a master at this: the transition between the Danse sacrée and the Danse profane, and, of course, the segment connecting “Les parfums de la nuit” and “Le matin d'un jour de fête” in Ibéria. Boulez’s Pli selon pli also has several moments like this.

It’s as if the music suddenly found itself in a sort of no man’s land, became static, and lost any sense of space and time...I can’t describe it better.

Thanks for the feedback here, Rafael. I’ll have to listen out for this.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2019, 06:59:17 AM »
I’m surprised there’s not that many replies in this thread. Well, I guess I shouldn’t be too surprised as Enescu’s music does take a bit of effort to get into, but, of course, I could just be talking about myself here.
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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2019, 05:33:55 PM »
I’m surprised there’s not that many replies in this thread. Well, I guess I shouldn’t be too surprised as Enescu’s music does take a bit of effort to get into, but, of course, I could just be talking about myself here.
There is a good chance that many people haven't listened to more than five.
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Your Top 5 Enescu Works
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2019, 07:31:34 PM »
There is a good chance that many people haven't listened to more than five.

Yes, indeed. His oeuvre isn’t too large, but it’s worth the effort getting familiar with his music, IMHO.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy