Author Topic: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord  (Read 151510 times)

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Offline JoshLilly

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #40 on: September 05, 2007, 10:04:13 AM »
The... lutichord?  Prior to the 19th century it was common to not specify keyboard works at all unless it were for the organ or something else unusual, so how many of J.S. Bach's generic keyboard works could be played on this instrument? It would seem he specifically intended S996, S997 and S998 for a Lautenwerck and was personally involved in its design. The Wikipedia entry on the Lautenwerck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lute-harpsichord) says:

"The instrument was favored by J. S. Bach, who owned two of the instruments at the time of his death, but no specimens have survived to the present day. It was revived in the 20th century and two of its most prominent performers are the early music specialists Gergely Sárközy and Robert Hill."

What a sound!

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #41 on: November 03, 2007, 02:46:35 AM »
Just got this.
And to introduce another period keyboard instrument on this thread: it's played on a pedal harpsichord.
The pedal harpsichord used here consists actually of two harpsichords - one mounted on the other, the lower one played with pedals to create the bass line. Further details at the link. To quote JoshLilly: what a sound!  :)


click picture for clips

Yves Rechsteiner plays the Chromatic Fantasia, two of the Trio Sonatas and various transcriptions of Bach's music for violin solo. The instrument sounds impressive and is superbly recorded. When played at reasonable volume the effect can be as overwhelming as the sound of an organ and in fact does bear some similarities.

The playing is excellent, Rechsteiner is a very fine harpsichordist indeed. Would like to hear more of him.
He is the hands-on-and-not-to-linger type of player. Swift and clearly articulated, poetic if needed.
From the works played, I like the "added" effect of the pedal harpsichord best in the Trio Sonatas and the transcriptions. In the Chromatic Fantasia it does seem a touch overbearing sometimes.

This is a marvelous disc and recommended for anyone who is experienced in Bach harpsichord recordings and would like some alternative flavour.  :)

Q
« Last Edit: July 18, 2013, 09:34:38 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2008, 01:14:50 AM »
Though mentioned once before, a short note of my impressions on these marvelous recordings of Bach WTC.
These were on my list a long time, but were no priority because I already had splendid WTC by Glen Wilson (Teldec - OOP). But I'm glad I eventually did pick them up.
Dantone is a player with an elegant and extrovert, at times even dashing, style: this WTC sparkles freely on a crisp and clear but lush sounding French harpsichord by Blanchet (1733). Dantone is generally swift(ish) and always keeps momentum - even in the slow passages there is a strong "pulse" and projection of the musical lines. Very strong bass lines. His freedom and extrovertness is combined with a firm grip on musical structure and a rock-solid rhythmic approach. And this combination makes it so special IMO. A strong and personal style that suits me. The recording is called "audiophile", and it lives up to this title.

I happily put this WTC next to Glen Wilson's more reflective approach.

 

             SAMPLES BOOK I                                      SAMPLES BOOK II

Q

À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #43 on: January 23, 2008, 01:34:08 AM »
Just got this.

E. Power Biggs actually recorded some Bach (6 Trio Sonatas for example) on a Challis pedal harpsichord, but that album has been out of print.  Maybe it's the way the instruments were made and recorded differently, but Rechsteiner's instrument puts out a much more discreet bass compared to the "Biggs" one.  ;)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2008, 01:40:46 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #44 on: April 14, 2008, 08:39:41 AM »
Has anyone heard this?  :)



Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #45 on: April 14, 2008, 08:52:24 AM »


The playing is excellent, Rechsteiner is a very fine harpsichordist indeed. Would like to hear more of him.
He is the hands-on-and-not-to-linger type of player. Swift and clearly articulated, poetic if needed.


Rechsteiner's mainly an organist really as his other recording on the Alpha label shows -
Liszt (with a heavy Bach thematic link) on a beautiful 19th century organ.  I have not
since heard him elsewhere on disc.
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #46 on: April 14, 2008, 09:09:48 AM »
Has anyone heard this?  :)
<Egarr's WTC1>
Q

Somehow after Egarr's s-l-o-w Goldberg, I feel reluctant to explore his views on WTC, at full price to boot.  His Handel Op. 4 seems to be much better received here in UK.

EDIT.  Found a lower price and ventured a buy.  Will report back if it turns out to be more appealing than his oh-so-beautiful Goldberg.
But I imagine that, to these ears, Hantai's blazing recording on Mirare will be hard to beat.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 09:13:56 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2008, 09:17:40 AM »
EDIT.  Found a lower price and ventured a buy.  Will report back if it turns out to be more appealing than his oh-so-beautiful Goldberg.

Yes, please do.  :)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #48 on: April 14, 2008, 09:26:23 AM »
Yes, please do.  :)

Q

On strength of the slogan in my signature, I figured that I have not sinned.  ;)
« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 09:28:07 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #49 on: April 14, 2008, 09:42:56 AM »
Has anyone heard this?  :)



Q

It is in my CDs to be listened to pile.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2008, 09:45:24 AM »
It is in my CDs to be listened to pile.

Perhaps you will file a report first?  :) 

(Please don't tell me it's better than Hantai's blazing, virtuosic effort on Mirare.
Where is Pierre's Book II?  I have been waiting.  :-\ )
« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 09:47:28 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2008, 10:08:01 AM »
Perhaps you will file a report first?  :) 

(Please don't tell me it's better than Hantai's blazing, virtuosic effort on Mirare.
Where is Pierre's Book II?  I have been waiting.  :-\ )

Well, I shall try to get the time give it a listen in the week-end.
Now I am perhaps shocking you: I do not know the Hantaï version.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #52 on: April 14, 2008, 10:13:36 AM »
Well, I shall try to get the time give it a listen in the week-end.
Now I am perhaps shocking you: I do not know the Hantaï version.

I tried Hantaï. but didn't like him that much. Like Ottavio Dantone very much on the other hand. (See few post back).

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #53 on: April 14, 2008, 11:08:37 AM »
I tried Hantaï. but didn't like him that much. Like Ottavio Dantone very much on the other hand. (See few post back).

Q

I find Dantone's reading to be dutiful (everything's done right, but one can imagine more in this music) but not very exciting....while Hantai takes lot of flights (and risks) with his fancy.   :D
« Last Edit: April 14, 2008, 11:10:23 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #54 on: April 14, 2008, 01:29:00 PM »
I tried Hantaï. but didn't like him that much. Like Ottavio Dantone very much on the other hand. (See few post back).

Q

That's pretty much how I see it as well.

As for Egarr's WTC, it has similar virtues and problems found in his Goldbergs - a high priority on beauty but no interest in getting his hands dirty or digging deep into the bleak pieces.  To me, it lacks "spine".

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #55 on: April 15, 2008, 01:51:13 AM »
As for Egarr's WTC, it has similar virtues and problems found in his Goldbergs - a high priority on beauty but no interest in getting his hands dirty or digging deep into the bleak pieces.  To me, it lacks "spine".

If it's just about "spine" I guess it's all right then.  "Spine" in a long, continuous work such as the Goldberg is a lot more important than it is in a collection of shorter, sundry pieces.
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #56 on: April 16, 2008, 12:36:20 PM »
Has anyone heard this?  :)



Q

Yes I have – now.

Egarr uses a modern copy of a ( Johannes?) Rückers harpsichord from 1638, an instrument I would expect to sound more crisp and even a bit harsh, but the sound of Egarr´s instrument is so sweet as to defy its origin. It may be the recording though, but it does not suit the music IMO . Egarr´s tempi are generally slow, often too slow to my taste, and he plays too much legato. He seems to confuse articulation and phrasing, playing long phrases in strict legato, and in the end the music presents itself badly under-articulated. His agogics are very free with much dragging, and essentially romantic. In the long run he seems mannered. All the pieces – most true of the fugues – get the same basic treatment without much individual characterisation. It is a dreadful exercise in futility, which at best may be good for sleeplessness.   
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Don

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #57 on: April 16, 2008, 12:48:48 PM »
If it's just about "spine" I guess it's all right then.  "Spine" in a long, continuous work such as the Goldberg is a lot more important than it is in a collection of shorter, sundry pieces.

I respectfully disagree.  A lack of spine, back-bone or whatever one might call it is negative for both the Goldbergs and WTC.

Don

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #58 on: April 16, 2008, 12:51:47 PM »
Yes I have – now.

Egarr uses a modern copy of a ( Johannes?) Rückers harpsichord from 1638, an instrument I would expect to sound more crisp and even a bit harsh, but the sound of Egarr´s instrument is so sweet as to defy its origin. It may be the recording though, but it does not suit the music IMO . Egarr´s tempi are generally slow, often too slow to my taste, and he plays too much legato. He seems to confuse articulation and phrasing, playing long phrases in strict legato, and in the end the music presents itself badly under-articulated. His agogics are very free with much dragging, and essentially romantic. In the long run he seems mannered. All the pieces – most true of the fugues – get the same basic treatment without much individual characterisation. It is a dreadful exercise in futility, which at best may be good for sleeplessness.   


And I thought that my view of the Egarr was rather negative.  According to Egarr, the "sweet" sound has something to do with using the new Lehman tuning system.

Offline Que

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Re: Bach on the harpsichord, lute-harpsichord, clavichord
« Reply #59 on: April 16, 2008, 12:59:17 PM »
Yes I have – now.

Egarr uses a modern copy of a ( Johannes?) Rückers harpsichord from 1638, an instrument I would expect to sound more crisp and even a bit harsh, but the sound of Egarr´s instrument is so sweet as to defy its origin. It may be the recording though, but it does not suit the music IMO . Egarr´s tempi are generally slow, often too slow to my taste, and he plays too much legato. He seems to confuse articulation and phrasing, playing long phrases in strict legato, and in the end the music presents itself badly under-articulated. His agogics are very free with much dragging, and essentially romantic. In the long run he seems mannered. All the pieces – most true of the fugues – get the same basic treatment without much individual characterisation. It is a dreadful exercise in futility, which at best may be good for sleeplessness.   

Thanks, Premont! :)
fl.traverso wasn't very hot on it either - at least that is what I gathered from his somewhat indirect comments.  8) (What is "cm"?)

Now that I have learned what people like here in UK by making friends with a couple of local fans of cm, I think Egarr here has a winner as far as THEIR taste is concerned.  Oh my this is so moderate, so deliberate, not to mention so discreet. "Sublime," in other words.  ;)  I couldn't share the Hantai WTC with my British friends for fear that they might disapprove of its wild ideas.  Now I know I have a safe choice when it is time to hear Bach together.  ;)

Q


À chacun son goût.

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