Author Topic: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.  (Read 2263 times)

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Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2019, 11:11:56 PM »
That really is a blast from the past. My older brother had the Grand Canyon Suite on LP and I nearly played it to death. I have it on a Naxos CD but somehow it lacks the magic of that long lost LP.

There is that Telarc recording which features "real thunder claps" and rather entertainingly explains just how difficult technically it was to "find" claps of thunder without any attendant rain.  This was when Telarc liked to include sound effects on their recordings with accompanying warnings about how it would blow your speakers.... the CD included the Cloudburst movement twice - once with sound effects, once without.....


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #21 on: April 02, 2019, 11:13:09 PM »
There is that Telarc recording which features "real thunder claps" and rather entertainingly explains just how difficult technically it was to "find" claps of thunder without any attendant rain.  This was when Telarc liked to include sound effects on their recordings with accompanying warnings about how it would blow your speakers.... the CD included the Cloudburst movement twice - once with sound effects, once without.....


Sounds fun!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline pjme

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2019, 12:19:22 AM »
A Technicolor storm :

Miklos Rozsa:
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/9AnjYRbEUeA" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/9AnjYRbEUeA</a>

Don't forget the thunder sheet:
Dramatist John Dennis devises the thundersheet as a new method of producing theatrical thunder for his tragedy Appius and Virginia at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London.

Notable orchestral works in which the musical instrument has been used include the following:

Richard Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie and the opera Die Frau ohne Schatten
Giuseppe Verdi: Otello
Richard Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen and Parsifal.
Mozart: The Magic Flute
Ignacy Jan Paderewski: Symphony in B minor "Polonia" (1903–08)
Alan Hovhaness: "Invocation to Vahakn No. 3"
Engelbert Humperdinck: Hänsel und Gretel
(source : Wiki)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/wmmNOau9ASg" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/wmmNOau9ASg</a>

And a violent, expressionist storm with a political twist:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/jbwDHpY5Ctk" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/jbwDHpY5Ctk</a>

Paying a musical tribute to the 50th anniversary of the October Revolution in 1967 was a matter of course for Paul Dessau. The news that the second Russian moon probe had landed in the “Sea of Tempests” on 24 December 1966 provided him not only with a title, but also with a “programme”. ...
The work culminates in a high E, maintained by thirty violins throughout an intensive crescendo, to symbolize what Dessau described as the “luminosity of a very bright star”
(Source Brillant)




Offline kyjo

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2019, 09:13:32 AM »
Atterberg - Symphony no. 3, mvt. 2
Grofé - “Cloudburst” from Grand Canyon Suite
Sibelius - Tapiola (middle section)

(+Gershwin: “Hurricane” from Porgy and Bess, Bax: November Woods, etc.)
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Offline Florestan

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #24 on: April 03, 2019, 09:57:12 AM »
Vivaldi - The Four Seasons, Summer, mvt. 3
Rossini - William Tell Overture, storm section

Great minds etc.  8)
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Online Brian

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #25 on: April 03, 2019, 01:38:47 PM »
I wasn't aware of a storm there...?
(There is a "storm" in the last of Kindertotenlieder "In diesem Wetter")
The loud, boisterous passage immediately before the military-style snare drum tapping and recapitulation was originally called a "Southern Storm" in Mahler's notes. I see from Utah Symphony program notes available online that he went back and forth over whether to describe it as a storm or a purely metaphorical battle fought between the forces of spring and summer. I think it's a pretty convincing storm!

I love the finale of Atterberg's Third Symphony, but I don't like the storm movement at all - it's just too long.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2019, 05:15:30 AM »

Don't forget the thunder sheet:
Dramatist John Dennis devises the thundersheet as a new method of producing theatrical thunder for his tragedy Appius and Virginia at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London.

Notable orchestral works in which the musical instrument has been used include the following:

Richard Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie and the opera Die Frau ohne Schatten
Giuseppe Verdi: Otello
Richard Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen and Parsifal.
Mozart: The Magic Flute
Ignacy Jan Paderewski: Symphony in B minor "Polonia" (1903–08)
Alan Hovhaness: "Invocation to Vahakn No. 3"
Engelbert Humperdinck: Hänsel und Gretel
(source : Wiki)

I realize I'm going off on a tangent here, but a few other pieces that deploy the thunder sheet to great effect are Havergal Brian's Symphony No. 10 and the three works that make up James MacMillan's Triduum: The World's Ransoming, Cello Concerto and Symphony No. 1 ("Vigil").

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #27 on: April 05, 2019, 12:27:15 AM »
I realize I'm going off on a tangent here, but a few other pieces that deploy the thunder sheet to great effect are Havergal Brian's Symphony No. 10 and the three works that make up James MacMillan's Triduum: The World's Ransoming, Cello Concerto and Symphony No. 1 ("Vigil").

Thanks and also a vote for HB Symphony 10.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Holden

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #28 on: April 06, 2019, 12:33:28 PM »
Great minds etc.  8)
Yes. Toscanini’s version of the William Tell Overture immediately came to mind.
Cheers

Holden

Offline André

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #29 on: April 06, 2019, 01:40:33 PM »
Yes. Toscanini’s version of the William Tell Overture immediately came to mind.

Easily the most frightening on disc, with a final gallop to end them all.

Offline Florestan

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2019, 03:24:47 AM »
Yes. Toscanini’s version of the William Tell Overture immediately came to mind.

Easily the most frightening on disc, with a final gallop to end them all.

Which one? 1939 or 1952?
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Online Madiel

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #31 on: April 08, 2019, 03:59:56 AM »
People have already mentioned most of the ones I could think of, except...


Thomas Linley the Younger, in his short life, did some music for The Tempest. And Arise ye spirits of the storm is a knockout.
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Offline André

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #32 on: April 08, 2019, 04:17:47 AM »
In Walter Braunfels’ opera Die Vögel (The Birds), an angry Jupiter unelashes the might of the Northern and Southern winds over the flock of rebelling birds. A quite effective scene.

Offline Hattoff

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2019, 06:15:20 AM »
Napoleon's retreat from Moscow in Prokofiev's War and Peace. It's so vivid it hurts. You wouldn't want to be there.

Offline knight66

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #34 on: April 08, 2019, 07:29:56 AM »
Most of my favourite storms are present and correct. But I am surprised that so far no one has mentioned the Overture of Wagner’s Flying Dutchman. There is also a terrific storm within the opera with the sailors stamping and making a superb din.

Mike
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #35 on: April 08, 2019, 10:43:58 AM »
Napoleon's retreat from Moscow in Prokofiev's War and Peace. It's so vivid it hurts. You wouldn't want to be there.
Of course! The evocative 'Snowstorm' when Prince Andrei arrives back home is also one that I should have remembered. Thank you.

Also, Sviridov's 'The Snowstorm' is worth inclusion.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 10:46:16 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #36 on: April 08, 2019, 11:03:36 AM »
There is that Telarc recording which features "real thunder claps" and rather entertainingly explains just how difficult technically it was to "find" claps of thunder without any attendant rain.  This was when Telarc liked to include sound effects on their recordings with accompanying warnings about how it would blow your speakers.... the CD included the Cloudburst movement twice - once with sound effects, once without.....



Yes, I remember their recording of the 1812 overture, on LP. So much boasting about the canons, and the groove had visible squiggles. Never had a phono cartridge that could track it. Every recording was like a bass drum concerto. It was years before I could take Telarc seriously.

Offline André

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Re: Three favourite depictions of a storm in music.
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2019, 01:13:37 PM »
Most of my favourite storms are present and correct. But I am surprised that so far no one has mentioned the Overture of Wagner’s Flying Dutchman. There is also a terrific storm within the opera with the sailors stamping and making a superb din.

Mike

See reply no 9  :)

Not described as a storm as such, but the first movement of Mendelssohn’s Scottish symphony whips the music into quite a lather. One of my favourite symphony movements.