Author Topic: Klaus Huber's Hut  (Read 377 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Klaus Huber's Hut
« on: April 09, 2019, 04:39:12 AM »
He was a major influence on Ferneyhough and I like Ferneyhough. I know nothing about him other than that, though I've started to listen to some quartets. Has anyone any insights, ideas, recommendations, experiences etc etc?
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2019, 06:06:42 AM »
Was he a major influence on Ferneyhough? I know that Ferneyhough studied under him and they both taught at Freiburg for a time, but Ferneyhough has not talked about Huber as a model much. (I vaguely remember some critical remarks made by Ferneyhough about Huber). It might be like calling Renee Leibowitz a major influence on Boulez just because the latter studied under the former, even though the few things Boulez has said about Leibowitz are mainly quite negative.

Over the years I have ripped an ample collection of Huber recordings from libraries across Europe, but I have not actually sat down and listened to any of it yet. This thread might give me the needed kick in the arse.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2019, 06:31:30 AM »
Yes and no, there's this interview from Stephen Harold Riggins, The Pleasures of Time: Two Men, a Life (Insomniac Press 2009)

Quote
Following this is a discussion of Femeyhough's complex relationship with two teachers, Ton de Leeuw and Goffredo Petrassi. Although he is willing to talk about these experiences in detail, this information, is not flattering, particularly for someone who at the time is himself teaching music. With Klaus Huber, Ferneyhough managed to establish a relation-ship that was much more constructive.

 
Ferneyhough: I met Klaus Huber at the Gaudeamus Foundation in '68, the first year I was there. He struck me then in a curious way as a very gentle and very saintly man. At the time we had a misunderstanding. My music, for completely irrelevant reasons, seemed to him to have a great deal in common with his own. This has been the source of fruitful misunderstandings ever since.

Riggins: What did Huber think you had in common?

Ferneyhough: We had a certain very tight structuralism in small movements which were connected together.... I came from Schlinberg-Webern mixtures. I developed the most incredibly one-sided complex technique at this stage of composition. There was a megalomaniac length of pieces and intricate developments. One or two motives, I suppose, would be ultimately derivable from the aesthetics of Boulez, although at that stage I didn't really know much about his compositional techniques. I had seen the scores, looked at them totally unintellectually, and thought this was nice. I tried something similar. Klaus Huber's music has gone in the direction of a sort of aesthetic mysticism. He wants to say things about time, about the human experience in the face of eternity. The personality as it's given in a moment, for instance in relation to the horrors of war in his piece ...inwendig voller Figur..., based on a Durer woodcut which sort of prefigures atomic war. His violin concerto, Tempora, is a piece based upon growth out of nothing. It's a mystic principle of sound. Stones are rubbed and banged together. This is gradually extended into long notes and into Gregorian chant at the end. A great score.

He thought at this time that I had the same spiritual attitudes. But I don't. I am totally irreligious. I am a person who is perhaps obsessed with a certain dry pedanticism which contrasts with the wilder side and the megalomaniac side. It is by juxtaposing these two extremes that for me any form of creative activity is possible.... ...I try to write music which is totally hermetically dosed within its self, a dosed universe within which a person may discard his earlier per-sonality, his earlier preconceptions and absorb these totally illogical sets of presuppositions which I present to him. It's like a labyrinth. It works on so many different levels. One can choose in which direction he moves within this labyrinth of possibilities.

Riggins: From what you say none of your teachers had an influence upon your compositions?

Femeyhough: Yes. Klaus Huber has had an effect upon my composi-tions in that he was the first person who ever encouraged me to keep on composing at a very late date indeed.

Riggins: But did Huber direct your interests in any way or were they already formed?

Ferneyhough: He directed my interests in no way whatsoever. I was a terrible pupil because I always copied out my pages in neat script before I took them to him. So I couldn't possibly alter anything as a consequence of what he said. Every week I would go with some nice new pages. He would say: "Ah. ..yes...well...yes. Yes. Explain me that. Explain me that. How does that go? Yes. Yes." And then we talked about something totally different. It was very stimulating. What could he say? He couldn't say: "Well, that doesn't work. That doesn't work." If he did, I would say: "It's too late. It's there now." (March 26, 1974)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 06:37:11 AM by Mandryka »
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Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2019, 07:30:18 AM »
I was going to contribute, until it dawned on me that the thread is not about Karel Husa. :(

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2019, 09:19:05 AM »
Is this Tempora, the violin "concerto" that Ferneyhough says is "a great score?" I'm not hearing " Stones are rubbed and banged together. This is gradually extended into long notes and into Gregorian chant at the end."

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/-3MMkVxJUmY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/-3MMkVxJUmY</a>

There are three parts, the rest is there, be careful with your speakers -- it goes unexpectedly from very quiet to very loud.

No comments, 18 views in 3 years, three of them by me.


Oh it is Huber. I rather like it, there are Ferneyhough type moments in there even I think (the way one voice interrupts another sometimes)



« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 09:24:34 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2019, 09:39:00 AM »
Does anyone have this? If so, could I have an upload please? Or if you see it for around £15 please let me know.

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Offline schnittkease

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Re: Klaus Huber's Hut
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2019, 04:36:15 PM »
Here's an old thread on Huber that contains some interesting thoughts.