Author Topic: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)  (Read 59128 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #460 on: April 24, 2019, 01:55:00 AM »
OK, I didn't realise the DG recording had No. 2 on it as well. All the better.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #461 on: May 20, 2019, 01:20:54 AM »

The Piano Quintet and Piano Sonata No.6 are two clear favourites for me, the quintet being just full of remarkable moments, and the sonata with an absolutely lovely opening Adagio of almost haiku-like simplicity.

The review above mentions not having heard the Attacca Quartet version of the Piano Quintet, which is coincidentally the one I've got to know the work with. I haven't heard any other yet, but fwiw will say that if I needed my metaphorical socks removing in a hurry, this would be an option.

I'm listening to the Attacca Quartet's Weinberg right now. HOLY COW, they really are something special. The third movement is so wildly over the top (in a good, very amusing way)... it beggars belief.  ;D

Offline Daverz

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #462 on: May 20, 2019, 04:48:15 AM »
I listened to the Silesian Quartet's No. 7 on Qobuz the other night and think I like this much better than the Danel recording, though I need to revisit that one to be fair.




« Last Edit: May 20, 2019, 04:50:17 AM by Daverz »

Offline kyjo

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #463 on: May 20, 2019, 11:09:06 AM »
I recently witnessed a gripping, searing performance of Weinberg’s Piano Quintet as part of my university’s faculty chamber music series. The performers were the fabulous pianist Dimitri Papadimitriou along with the Clarion Quartet, who are all members of Pittsburgh Symphony and who specialize in the music of Jewish composers affected by the Holocaust. I had previously not realized what a stunning work it is - there are occasional echoes of the Shostakovich PQ, sure, but the Weinberg probes even deeper than that work IMO. The grotesque, scintillating scherzo, the deeply tragic slow movement, and the hauntingly ambiguous ending are especially of note. It was great to see the music of a lesser-known composer receive such passionate advocacy in a live performance. It certainly seems like Weinberg’s star is in the ascendant! :)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #464 on: May 20, 2019, 12:32:24 PM »
I recently witnessed a gripping, searing performance of Weinberg’s Piano Quintet as part of my university’s faculty chamber music series. The performers were the fabulous pianist Dimitri Papadimitriou along with the Clarion Quartet, who are all members of Pittsburgh Symphony and who specialize in the music of Jewish composers affected by the Holocaust. I had previously not realized what a stunning work it is - there are occasional echoes of the Shostakovich PQ, sure, but the Weinberg probes even deeper than that work IMO. The grotesque, scintillating scherzo, the deeply tragic slow movement, and the hauntingly ambiguous ending are especially of note. It was great to see the music of a lesser-known composer receive such passionate advocacy in a live performance. It certainly seems like Weinberg’s star is in the ascendant! :)
I agree that it's a fabulous work Kyle. It is my favourite of the chamber works I know, whilst Symphony 5 (especially in Kondrashin's recording) is his orchestral masterpiece IMO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline relm1

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #465 on: May 20, 2019, 02:39:42 PM »
I agree that it's a fabulous work Kyle. It is my favourite of the chamber works I know, whilst Symphony 5 (especially in Kondrashin's recording) is his orchestral masterpiece IMO.

Please explain, what is it about these two works that you find so compelling?  Why should someone who hasn't heard these NEED to hear them?

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #466 on: May 20, 2019, 03:31:42 PM »
Please explain, what is it about these two works that you find so compelling?  Why should someone who hasn't heard these NEED to hear them?

Please explain, what is it about Beethoven's op.59/1 and his 1st Piano Concerto that you find so compelling?  Why should someone who hasn't heard these NEED to hear them?

By which I mean to suggest: What you are asking for is quite a lot, actually. Almost immodestly so. I know you didn't ask me... but think about if someone had asked you. It's actually quite difficult to put into words why certain musics are great. Most descriptions just side-step the issue... calling it "compelling" or using other adjectives that really just kick the linguistic can down the road.

If it is worth anything at all, I agree with the above -- and very many others with us -- that the Piano Quintet of Weinberg's is one of the great chamber compositions of the 20th century. Utterly... well... "compelling" music. Joy and pain and elation and bitterness, all in four movements.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #467 on: May 20, 2019, 10:38:57 PM »
Please explain, what is it about these two works that you find so compelling?  Why should someone who hasn't heard these NEED to hear them?

Well, and I take SurprisedByBeauty's point that it is difficult (for me at least) to articulate what is essentially an emotional appeal. I've always been deeply moved by Shostakovich's 4th Symphony, especially the last part. It was withdrawn of course during the Stalin era and to me, a history teacher, reflects the fear, anxiety and profound sadness of that period like no other work. There are only two other symphonies, in my view, which come close to its cataclysmic appeal and they are Popov's First Symphony and Weinberg's 5th Symphony, which has, for me, a most wonderfully searching and visionary quality to it. When I was 17 Vaughan Williams's 6th Symphony (LPO Boult, with speech by the composer) had the most enormous effect on me and really switched me over from jazz-rock to classical music. At the time I felt that I KNEW what the music was about but had no idea how to express what I felt in words, because the appeal of that music was on a level beyond words. That may sound pretentious but it is how I felt at the time. Both the works I mentioned by Weinberg are gripping, powerful, dramatic and searching. Kyle (Kylo) expresses it better that I could about the Piano Quintet.
That's probably the best I can do for now.  :)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 04:40:40 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Mieczysław Weinberg (1919-1996)
« Reply #468 on: May 25, 2019, 03:29:04 PM »

 

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