Author Topic: Cortot's Chopin Etudes  (Read 7199 times)

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George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #20 on: July 20, 2008, 06:58:16 AM »
This strongly mirrors my own thoughts on the issue. (And thanks in advance for the upload! :))

I have two of those Naxos CDs Renfield, the one with the preludes and the one with the waltzes. Both were mastered by Mark Obert Thorn, so no need to be worried about the sound. I am spinning the preludes one now and it sounds great. I honestly can't believe this was recorded in 1926!  :o

I bought mine from MDT - http://www.mdt.co.uk
« Last Edit: July 20, 2008, 07:10:49 AM by George »

Offline zamyrabyrd

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2008, 07:42:47 AM »
Lately I stumbled upon Vladimir de Pachmann's recordings on youtube and one video in particular compares his Op. 10 No. 1 with Argerich--nothing could be more different!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYWoo1aMCUg

I actually like the older pianist's playing better than the "volcanic fury" as described by one of the commentators below. Incredibly, he was born the same year that Chopin died, 1848, and studied with one of his students. Conceivably, he is closer to the Chopin style from the oral tradition of teacher to pupil.

In his later years, de Pachmann was somewhat nutty on the stage, like reading his mail and commenting during performances. It seems he had a running dispute with Godowsky and mentioned him by name:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QCX4P7uHPc

This is simply INCREDIBLE, the Liszt "Rigoletto Paraphrase":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VPQ3PrGLBKs

ZB
“Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, one by one.”

― Charles MacKay, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Offline orbital

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #22 on: July 20, 2008, 11:29:30 PM »
Between the two etudes sets on EMI, I'd definitely go with the 30's (the earlier one) recording. In fact, this is my favorite Op.10 recording as a whole (this and the live Ciani one for a completely different but even fresher approach).

If you are solely interested in Cortot's performance, you, like me, should keep your hopes up for a Zenph reperformance issue of Cortot's full set. They have put out one track: http://zenph.com/audio/Zenph-Chopin-Gmajor-2005.mp3 in which Cortot's 1926 performance is mimicked on a modern instrument. I would definitely go for the full set if they ever release it.

George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #23 on: January 02, 2009, 07:30:25 PM »
And I also have the recent EMI remastering of the Preludes, etc.:


(That's about all the Cortot I have. :P)


How's the sound on that one? Can you tell me who did the transfers?

Renfield

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2009, 06:03:07 AM »
How's the sound on that one? Can you tell me who did the transfers?

The sound, to my ear, is great. It's very well remastered, though I can't vouch on exactly how (it's been a while since I've last listened to the disc, and I bought it before the bigger set), while I also need to check for the name of the remastering engineer.

(Most of the piano CDs are still somewhat packed, hence my not doing it right now.)

Do note that Cortot's playing is less "vulnerable" to filtering than, say, Schnabel's. And I find that a lot of these EMI remasterings for Cortot in specific bring out his tone wonderfully. Still, I will repeat that the side-by-side listening test should update my view with more accurate data. :)

George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2009, 06:17:14 AM »
Thanks Renfield! Since the 1933 preludes are only available on that EMI disc, this is good news!

BTW, I found this info moments ago:

ALFRED CORTOT (1877-1962)

Cortot was one of the most recorded pianists of the 78rpm era. His very first discs were made around 1902 as accompanist to soprano Felia Litvinne. All of the Litvinne/Cortot discs have been transferred to CD on MARSTON 52049. His earliest solo piano recordings (1919-1925) can be found on BIDDULPH LHW 14/15, “Complete Victor Acoustic Recordings.” PEARL 9836 also contains recordings from those years. Shorter works recorded between 1925 and 1939 can be found on BIDDULPH LHW 20. Cortot’s earliest electrical discs for Victor (1925-26) are now available on NAXOS 8.111261.

Cortot recorded many of Chopin’s works, some multiple times. The four Ballades were recorded in both 1929 and 1933. The earlier cycle can be found on NAXOS 8. 111245. The later version is included in EMI’s six-CD box of Chopin (EMI 67359). He also recorded the 24 Etudes twice (1933-34 and 1942). The earlier version is preferable and has been well transferred on NAXOS 8.111052, but less impressively in the EMI box, which also includes the 1942 account. There were three approved Cortot studio recordings of the 24 Chopin Preludes. The 1926 cycle is on NAXOS 8.111023 (with the four Impromptus); the 1933-34 version is on EMI 61050 (also with the Impromptus), and the less desirable 1942 traversal is included in the EMI box. The Chopin Sonatas Op.35 and Op.58 were both recorded twice on 78s.The 1928 version of Op.35 is available on NAXOS 8.111065, while the 1933 remake is on MUSIC & ARTS 717 and in the EMI box. For Op.58, there are recordings from 1931 and 1933. The former may be found in the EMI set and MUSIC & ARTS 717; for the 1933 recording, NAXOS 8.111065 is the source. Chopin’s “standard 14” Waltzes exist in Cortot recordings from 1934 and 1942. Only four Waltzes from the earlier version were included in the EMI box, even though there was ample room for all—a clear example of careless planning. Fortunately, NAXOS 8.111035 offers the complete set plus interesting later versions of several Waltzes. Other Chopin by Cortot includes six Nocturnes, the Barcarolle, Berceuse, Tarantelle and Polonaise Op.53. All are in the EMI box and are used as fillers in the above-mentioned Naxos CDs.

Source: http://www.lib.umd.edu/PAL/IPAM/bgad.html

George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2009, 06:23:02 AM »

Renfield

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #27 on: January 03, 2009, 06:31:31 AM »
Splendid reference!

This should come in very handy. :)

Online Que

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #28 on: January 03, 2009, 06:57:38 AM »
Since the 1933 preludes are only available on that EMI disc, this is good news! l

And on this one below (GPOC), in excellent transfers BTW. Haven't heard the new EMI GROC.



Q
À chacun son goût.

George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #29 on: January 03, 2009, 07:39:39 AM »
And on this one below (GPOC), in excellent transfers BTW. Haven't heard the new EMI GROC.



Q

Thanks Que! Interesting that that discography I have doesn't list this CD as having the 1933 preludes.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2009, 07:42:19 AM by George »

Online Que

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2009, 08:11:22 AM »
Thanks Que! Interesting that that discography I have doesn't list this CD as having the 1933 preludes.

Correct. It's listed like this:

4) 2nd Dec. 1942, Studio Albert, Paris(complete)
   * Producer/Engineer ; unknown /Eugène Ravenet
   * 78s info ; HMV W 1541~44 - 2LA 3897~3904
   * CD ; EMI CZS 7 67359 2(6 set), Philips 456 754-2(2 set), Shinseido SGR-8104
   * transferring from 78s ; Charles Levin(EMI set)
         Note ] I don't know which version is included in Philips release.


The story goes like this. Alfred Brendel, who was involved in the GPOC series seems to have told that initially Philips made a mistake by putting the '40s recordings on disc instead of the recordings from 1933 as was intended. This was later corrected but meanwhile a number of copies was already into circulation with the wrong ('40s) recordings. ::)

Q
À chacun son goût.

George

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2009, 08:14:41 AM »
Correct. It's listed like this:


The story goes like this. Alfred Brendel, who was involved in the GPOC series seems to have told that initially Philips made a mistake by putting the '40s recordings on disc instead of the recordings from 1933 as was intended. This was later corrected but meanwhile a number of copies was already into circulation with the wrong ('40s) recordings. ::)

Q

Wow, I wonder how the two can be told apart without listening? I bet the artwork is the same, only the different performance on the CDs.

Just sent you a PM.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2009, 08:17:45 AM by George »

Online czgirb

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #32 on: Today at 05:26:02 AM »
And on this one below (GPOC), in excellent transfers BTW. Haven't heard the new EMI GROC.



Q

hallo Que ... what about know
have You ever heard the GROC
today, it also remastered by ...
* naxos ... www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/Feb06/Cortot_Chopin_vol1_8111023.htm and
* prestine audio ... https://www.pristineclassical.com/products/pakm059

Online Que

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Re: Cortot's Chopin Etudes
« Reply #33 on: Today at 05:41:07 AM »
hallo Que ... what about know
have You ever heard the GROC
today, it also remastered by ...
* naxos ... www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2006/Feb06/Cortot_Chopin_vol1_8111023.htm and
* prestine audio ... https://www.pristineclassical.com/products/pakm059

Haven't heard any if the alternative transfers that you list....

Sorry that I can't be of help with any comparisons.

Q
À chacun son goût.