Author Topic: Bach on the piano  (Read 54040 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #500 on: March 21, 2018, 09:08:47 AM »
. . . my temper does not oscillate with this kind of uninhibited emotional outbreaks.

I don't mean to be cheeky, or not much anyway, but this comment went through my mind while listening to this recording of Buxtehude fantasies. It's interesting to have them all collected together, and the way that Peretti plays them, the music is indeed littered with sudden changes, which you could say are "uninhibited emotional outbreaks."

We've mentioned the issue of transitions in Buxtehude before . . .


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Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #501 on: March 21, 2018, 11:23:21 AM »
On Bach's 333rd Birthday:

Classical CD Of The Week: Anton Batagov's Bach Is For Tripping



Every click helps keeping classical music coverage (of which I am sadly the only exponent) alive on Forbes.com. Which, even if you don't like it much or think me an ass, is better than it not being there, right?



Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #503 on: March 21, 2018, 02:59:58 PM »
Anything by Bach here?
Nope - that was a brainfart.

Meant to post this:

On Bach's 333rd Birthday -- something that is Bach, and isn't.

Classical CD Of The Week: Anton Batagov's Bach Is For Tripping



Every click helps...

No, that wasn't it, either. I don't even know what that was then. State of confusion.

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #504 on: March 21, 2018, 03:08:22 PM »
Nope - that was a brainfart.

With such an explicit explanation you are readily forgiven. :)
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #505 on: March 21, 2018, 03:51:14 PM »
I don't mean to be cheeky, or not much anyway, but this comment went through my mind while listening to this recording of Buxtehude fantasies. It's interesting to have them all collected together, and the way that Peretti plays them, the music is indeed littered with sudden changes, which you could say are "uninhibited emotional outbreaks."

We've mentioned the issue of transitions in Buxtehude before . . .




I own this recording, and I do not recall any uninhibited emotional outbreaks. On the contrary I recall controlled spontaneity a la Leonhardt. I think I shall relisten to this as well as to his Clavierübung III.

There is so much to listen to, I do not think I quite can keep up with all of it. :)
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #506 on: April 19, 2018, 04:59:21 AM »


Stefano Greco made a recording of AoF with Aldo Ciccolini, which I've been unable to find. Anyway, while searching I came across this GV - the whole caboodle, and IMO stylishly and attractively played, with just one two lapses of judgement. More moderate than demonic, more beautiful than muscular, more tranquil than barnstorming. There's a lightness about what he does which I find interesting as an approach. His website suggests a thoughtful and curious musician who prioritises concerts rather than recordings.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 05:20:29 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #507 on: April 19, 2018, 06:48:34 AM »
Stefano Greco made a recording of AoF with Aldo Ciccolini, which I've been unable to find.

One might get the impression, that it never has been released.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #508 on: April 19, 2018, 07:26:47 AM »
I came across something totally unexpected today - AoF for modern piano and organ (Lausanne),  some of the fugues turned into duets! Christoph Geiser and Elizabeth Sombart.

Re Greco, in one respect the above post is too charitable, he probably does use more dynamic variation to highlight short phrases than he should. As they all do. What an unsubtle and inelegant way to attract the listener's ear!
« Last Edit: April 19, 2018, 07:35:22 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Bach on the piano
« Reply #509 on: April 19, 2018, 10:41:36 AM »
I came across something totally unexpected today - AoF for modern piano and organ (Lausanne),  some of the fugues turned into duets! Christoph Geiser and Elizabeth Sombart.

Yes, I was also surprised when I saw it , because I would expect a large modern church organ  and a piano to blend poorly. And they do indeed. Maybe a chamber organ would be better. I also find the actual interpretation much too earth-bound.
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