Author Topic: "New" Music Log  (Read 92224 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 51812
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #220 on: December 13, 2011, 04:53:04 AM »
. . .  I have a hard time thinking that I will revisit these works.

Sound is generally okay, though it can be a bit steely in the earlier recordings.  The Kontra Quartet do seem to play well and in a committed fashion, but I just don’t care much for the music.  I can’t like everything.

Good on you for giving so much new stuff (to you) a go!

I understand all these sounding like they fade into a unform grey on an initial listen.  And of course, maybe it's simply true that these will never do much for you.  But if you're game two, three years hence, pay them a fresh visit; you may find more variety than has impressed you on this go-through.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #221 on: January 04, 2012, 09:59:45 AM »


I’ve been vaguely aware of Don Carlo Gesualdo for a while.  Recently, Alex Ross wrote a couple articles in The New Yorker that really piqued my interest.  A Renaissance OJ Simpson who was also batshit crazy should have written some interesting music.  Okay, okay, I was intrigued for non-musical reasons.  So?  Yes, I needed to sample some of Gesualdo’s Madrigals.

To the music: It ain’t too shabby, but it’s not what I was expecting.  The articles by Mr Ross made it seem as though the music would be disconcerting or hard to appreciate for its chromaticism.  Not so.  Perhaps I’ve listened to a wide enough variety of music that nothing seems especially “difficult”, but nothing was shocking or hard to get into.  The disparate vocal lines are quite captivating, if not perhaps as compelling as the polyphony of Morales or Victoria.  Apples and oranges.  Even the texts are better than average.

The only thing that I can’t really get into on this disc is the use of countertenors.  I don’t like countertenors.  I never have, and to the extent my opinion has changed over the years, it’s to like them less as time passes.  Don’t get me wrong, Delitiæ Musicæ perform splendidly.  I just don’t like countertenors.  So I should probably look into a different recording using women for the high parts, presuming they exist.  Sound is excellent.  A nice disc that makes me want to explore more.


The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline The new erato

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 14542
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #222 on: January 04, 2012, 10:11:23 AM »
The Gesualdo chromaticism mainly kicked in from the 4th or 5th Madrigal book IIRC. La Venexiana recorded both of those for Glossa, and it probably would be more of your thing.

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #223 on: January 04, 2012, 10:19:14 AM »
La Venexiana recorded both of those for Glossa, and it probably would be more of your thing.



Duly noted.  I think I shall try the fourth book.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 51812
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #224 on: January 04, 2012, 10:29:49 AM »
. . .  A Renaissance OJ Simpson who was also batshit crazy [....]

Is that a vote of confidence in Simpson's reason? ; )
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #225 on: January 26, 2012, 09:39:19 AM »




This is more like it!  My first foray into the perhaps slightly demented world of Carlo Gesualdo’s music was successful, but not as successful as it could have been due to the reliance on nothing but countertenors for the high parts.  This 2000 recording by La Venexiana of the fourth book of madrigals by the murderous Don has one countertenor and relies on the ladies for the high parts for the most part.  Wise choice.

All of the singers, lutists, and the harpsichord player acquit themselves quite well in this set.  The startling chromaticism I’ve read about is definitely on display, though it’s not particularly startling.  In some ways, it seems like it meshes an older style (Machaut, say) with polyphonic trends of the day.  The music falls quite easily on my ears.  Indeed, the whole disc sounds quite marvelous.  The texts, a bit dark at times, are pretty good, too.  This is some good stuff.  I think I need some more.

Thanks to the new erato for suggesting this one.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline mc ukrneal

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8848
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #226 on: January 26, 2012, 11:20:56 PM »



Repeated cravings for Heinrich Biber’s music keep popping up, and I just got to satisfy the cravings.  To satisfy the most recent craving, I bought this disc of Battalia à 10 and Requiem à 15 in Concerto performed by Jordi Savall and his musicians.  Yet again, Maestro Biber’s music is hard to resist.  Nay, impossible to resist. 

The disc opens with the small Battalia à 10, which is an early baroque musical depiction of battle, but one that is more focused on delivering light (at least at times), lively entertainment than something heavy-duty.  As with many other works I’ve heard, Biber shows his mastery of mixing and matching instruments in unusual combinations.  And he shows himself to be ahead of his time.  The second movement weaves eight then popular tunes together in a most dissonant form.  It sounds very much like something Ives would have written, but it’s a few hundred years older.  Astonishing.  Then there’s some snappy pizzacati later on that one could swear would have been penned by Bartok.  The entire little work is a delight first note to last, and is startlingly, well, modern.

The main work, the big old honkin’ Requiem, is not as ear opening, and does not necessarily match up to some of Biber’s other choral works, but it is something to hear nonetheless.  Written for the death of Archbishop Maximilian Gandolph, the work is not as dark and grim as some requiems.  Rather, it strikes me as more of a serious, almost stately, celebration of life and the heavenly rewards due such a personage as the Archbishop.  That doesn’t mean the work sounds trite or pandering in any way; it’s just another way to write a requiem.  The work is somewhat gimmicky, if you will, in that the forces are divided into five different spaces in the cathedral.  The resulting sound is unique, and the spatial effects quite compelling.  The gimmick works.

This disc is another winner.  Biber is fast becoming my go-to composer for early Baroque music.  Nary a bad work have I heard, and each new disc makes me want to hear more.  What more can one ask for, other than more?

Savall and crew do a fine job, as expected, and sound is sumptuous.  Why, oh why, can’t all recordings sound at least this good?

I find your listening comments quite interesting, and I decided to pick one that you listened to that piqued my intererest. So I picked a composer I knew nothing about, but had other discs out in case I liked him and wanted more, landing on Biber (and being at Berkshire didn't hurt either). It's been a while since you played this, but I really love it. Your description of the second track is what really caught my attention and you've described it perfectly - Astonishing! The idea of an old piece being modern in some way really got my attention. Fascinating disc in fantastic sound. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #227 on: May 23, 2012, 05:49:16 PM »
 



I’ve never really listened to too much Luigi Boccherini.  The little I’d heard always struck me as a lightweight alternative to Mozart and Haydn.  Then about a month ago or so, for no particular reason, I picked up an early ‘90s recording of some string quartets and quintets played by the Petersen Quartet.  This particular ensemble, long a fave of mine, always plays with high energy.  Music and musicians get along well.  The pieces display verve, polish, and eminent good taste.  Nothing strikes me as daring or formally perfect as similar works by Haydn or Mozart, but then I didn’t expect that to be the case.  (Really, who could?)  No, this well played and generally well recorded set is good for just sitting back and listening to, just because. 

The Jordi Savall-led disc is an altogether different animal.  He and his forces deliver on Boccherini’s formidable charm and polish, but they take it one further and imbue some of the music with more gravitas than one might expect.  It still comes across as Haydn-lite in some regards, but the supremely masterful playing and dedication shine through.  These are more serious and more significant pieces.  The two sinfonias are just dandy, but the Fandango that opens the disc and La Musica Notturna di Madrid which end it are more sophisticated and inventive.  On top of all of that is some of the finest recorded sound I’ve ever heard.  Possibly the finest.  The opening Fandango comes as close to sounding like live music as I have heard in a long time. 

I don’t think I’ll be going on a Boccherini binge, or anything, but these two sets make welcome additions to my collection.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

kishnevi

  • Guest
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #228 on: May 23, 2012, 07:26:24 PM »
 



I’ve never really listened to too much Luigi Boccherini.  The little I’d heard always struck me as a lightweight alternative to Mozart and Haydn.  Then about a month ago or so, for no particular reason, I picked up an early ‘90s recording of some string quartets and quintets played by the Petersen Quartet.  This particular ensemble, long a fave of mine, always plays with high energy.  Music and musicians get along well.  The pieces display verve, polish, and eminent good taste.  Nothing strikes me as daring or formally perfect as similar works by Haydn or Mozart, but then I didn’t expect that to be the case.  (Really, who could?)  No, this well played and generally well recorded set is good for just sitting back and listening to, just because. 

The Jordi Savall-led disc is an altogether different animal.  He and his forces deliver on Boccherini’s formidable charm and polish, but they take it one further and imbue some of the music with more gravitas than one might expect.  It still comes across as Haydn-lite in some regards, but the supremely masterful playing and dedication shine through.  These are more serious and more significant pieces.  The two sinfonias are just dandy, but the Fandango that opens the disc and La Musica Notturna di Madrid which end it are more sophisticated and inventive.  On top of all of that is some of the finest recorded sound I’ve ever heard.  Possibly the finest.  The opening Fandango comes as close to sounding like live music as I have heard in a long time. 

I don’t think I’ll be going on a Boccherini binge, or anything, but these two sets make welcome additions to my collection.

I have that Savall recording, and Night Music is indeed rather special.  However, overall I prefer the series of three CDs by Biondi/Europa Galante,  the first one of which includes the Fandango and the Night Music quintets;  Virgin has now re-issued two of the CDs together in its budget line of double CDs.  If you ever do feel like expanding your Boccherini,  I suggest them.  And there's also a series on Brilliant devoted to the string quintets (Magnifica Comunita is the name of the ensemble),  but that seems to have stalled out after about 8 installments.

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #229 on: June 20, 2012, 06:21:05 AM »



Hans Rott went bonkers and died of consumption in his 20s.  His life is a perfect romantic tragedy.  How could one not want to at least sample his big ol’ honkin’ Symphony in E Major?  With a new recording from Paavo Järvi and the Frankfurt RSO out, I figured I should give it a shot.

As I listened to the first two movements, one word came to mind: Wagner.  As I listened a bit more, another word popped into my head: Bruckner.  Finally, the word Mahler joined them, though for a different reason.  But it is Wagner who permeates the work.  At times it’s like listening to discarded excerpts from Lohengrin, or early sketches for Das Rheingold.  The way the brass is (excessively) deployed, the string figurations, the huge, bombastic tuttis – the influence of old Dick is omnipresent.  Bruckner’s influence is also obvious in some of the writing, but not the same extent.  And Mahler, well, Mahler is not an influence; rather, one can hear where Mahler got some of his ideas.  The third movement here – Frisch und lebhaft – sounds like a veritable sketchbook for Mahler’s Second.  In short, this is a large scale, bombastic, hefty, but quite derivative work.  It’s not bad, but I’d rather listen to the other three composers listed, or to other late romantics, than to Rott’s First.  The two movements from the B major Suite for Orchestra leave a similar impression.  I’ve listened to the disc twice, and will make sure to listen again a couple more times this year, but I seriously doubt that this disc will get much more than that.

Järvi and his band acquit themselves quite nicely, and the sound is generally good, though it seems to lack low frequency heft.

The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Oldnslow

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 145
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #230 on: June 20, 2012, 05:50:41 PM »
Todd, do you know the three symphonies of Rickard Wetz (CPO)? Very Brucknerian, and I like them quite a bit......

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #231 on: June 21, 2012, 07:19:33 AM »
Todd, do you know the three symphonies of Rickard Wetz (CPO)? Very Brucknerian, and I like them quite a bit......



I do not.  I may have to look into Mr Wetz a bit.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #232 on: August 09, 2012, 10:11:23 AM »
   



Until now I pretty much avoided Georg Philipp Telemann’s music.  Most comments I’ve seen are that his music is uninspired if well crafted.  Well, a disc of Paris sonatas as played by Gustav Leonhardt and associates is included in the Sony Leonhardt box-set, and well, I must say that I rather enjoyed what I heard.  The works are masterfully crafted.  They are nice to just listen to.  So then I decided to try something else, opting for the reissue Reinhard Goebel leading the Musica Antiqua Köln in the Tafelmusik.  I got the same impression.  The writing is meticulous, delightfully melodious, and just plain fun to listen to.  No, I cannot say that Telemann rises to the same level as Bach or Biber, but then, not everyone has to, and based on these recordings, he strikes me as far more interesting than Vivaldi.  I can’t say that I’m going to rush out and buy dozens of discs of Telemann’s music, but another disc or two can’t hurt.

Playing and sound for both sets are exemplary.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Scarpia

  • Guest
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #233 on: August 09, 2012, 10:22:48 AM »
My favorite Telemann is this



I also have a nice recording of the Paris Quartets by Sonnerie on Virgin, but that would duplicate the recording you already have.  I agree that Telemann is very rewarding to listen to.  He was a master of beautifully crafted counterpoint.


Offline Est.1965

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3898
  • Havergal Brian wrote two symphonies in 1965
  • Location: Clydebank, Scotland
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #234 on: August 10, 2012, 02:22:01 AM »



Hans Rott went bonkers and died of consumption in his 20s.  His life is a perfect romantic tragedy.  How could one not want to at least sample his big ol’ honkin’ Symphony in E Major?  With a new recording from Paavo Järvi and the Frankfurt RSO out, I figured I should give it a shot.
As I listened to the first two movements, one word came to mind: Wagner.  As I listened a bit more, another word popped into my head: Bruckner.  Finally, the word Mahler joined them, though for a different reason.  But it is Wagner who permeates the work.  At times it’s like listening to discarded excerpts from Lohengrin, or early sketches for Das Rheingold.  The way the brass is (excessively) deployed, the string figurations, the huge, bombastic tuttis – the influence of old Dick is omnipresent.  Bruckner’s influence is also obvious in some of the writing, but not the same extent.  And Mahler, well, Mahler is not an influence; rather, one can hear where Mahler got some of his ideas.  The third movement here – Frisch und lebhaft – sounds like a veritable sketchbook for Mahler’s Second.  In short, this is a large scale, bombastic, hefty, but quite derivative work.  It’s not bad, but I’d rather listen to the other three composers listed, or to other late romantics, than to Rott’s First.  The two movements from the B major Suite for Orchestra leave a similar impression.  I’ve listened to the disc twice, and will make sure to listen again a couple more times this year, but I seriously doubt that this disc will get much more than that.
Järvi and his band acquit themselves quite nicely, and the sound is generally good, though it seems to lack low frequency heft.

 >:(  It's not that bad and not as bombastic and derivative as the reviewer suggests.  The Bruckner and Wagner influences are indeed very evident in Rotts symphony, even some Brahms, capturing in its entireity the Zeitgeist of a musically changing, artistically rich Vienna.  This is probably why Brahms called his music 'vulgar' - because it was a quality tabloid in a room full of broadsheets.  I do agree though, that the sound quality in the recording could be better.  For anyone who wants to hear a better rendition with greater dynamic range and clarity, Segerstam with the Norrkopingers is still the best release out there.  This Jarvi disc is not even in my top three Rott performances, live and otherwise.
Dear Hans Rott
In the 1980s there was a creative punk group called "Big Audio Dynamite".  I have decided to apply the term to you, my man.  And I still haven't properly finished your Screenplay yet.  Too bad.  Take care anyway old chum, I'm off to listen to Brahms!
Kind regards, John

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #235 on: August 10, 2012, 05:16:12 AM »
This is probably why Brahms called his music 'vulgar'



I'm sure Brahms knew why he called it vulgar.  Can't say I disagree completely with that verdict.
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #236 on: August 13, 2012, 06:28:00 AM »


Hilary Hahn is pretty adventurous as far as A-listers go.  I mean, in the last few years she’s recorded Schoenberg and Ives.  Of course, she produces and owns here own recordings now, and then licenses them to DG, so she can afford to explore as much as she wants to.  It looks like she wanted to do something new and, per the liner notes, improvisational. 

So Ms Hahn schlepped her violin up to Iceland (Silfra being a rift in the tectonic plates up in that remote land), and proceeded to work with Hauschka, aka Volker Bertelmann, a German composer/pianist/prepared pianist.  With the assistance of a producer who has worked with Björk, among others, the two of them recorded a bunch of short pieces that were apparently all first takes and all improvised.  There’s lots of little percussive sounds, courtesy of the prepared piano, and presumably some other objects and instruments just lying around.  It’s all very Cage-y.  Hahn shrinks her sound, and she was also clearly recorded very close up.  And the two musicians jam.  It works pretty well.  It’s not the greatest thing I’ve heard, but there is no predictable flow, and some of the music is novel, or close to it.  I can’t say this is the most original thing I’ve heard, because literally the whole time I was listening, I kept thinking this sounds like Sigur Rós unplugged.  Maybe there’s something in the water up in Iceland. 

Very nice if obviously manipulated sonics. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #237 on: September 24, 2012, 05:30:55 PM »



Another hit from Biber.   Seven more works for violin and assortment of other instruments, each one vibrant, almost insanely inventive, beautiful, and just plain fun to listen to.  Should classical music ever be this much fun?  Yes, yes it should.  Push comes to shove, the Mystery Sonatas and Violin Sonatas are probably better, but these are top flight.  Reinhard Goebel and his Musica Anitqua Köln play superbly, and sound is generally excellent, if perhaps a bit hot here and there.  Biber is definitely my go-to guy for pre-Bach baroque, and the heaviest hitter between Cristobal de Morales and old JS. 

I guess I’m a Biber believer. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #238 on: October 21, 2012, 04:13:54 PM »


A month or two ago, I picked up David Greilsammer’s Naïve recording of two Mozart piano concertos and was most impressed.  Here’s a young-ish pianist – he’s 35, though the recording is a few years old – who plays with distinct style and made me listen to the old works with fresh ears, as it were.  He plays with great clarity, beauty, and, above all, delicacy.  He’s no barn-storming virtuoso, or at least not in Mozart.  I decided to hear him play something else, and this disc of two rarities and one war horse fit the bill. 

I’d never read of, let alone heard, Alexandre Tansman until I found this disc.  His second piano concerto, from 1927, in its world premiere recording, opens the disc.  It’s very much of its time and place, with two influences looming quite large: Gershwin and Ravel.  There are also a few hints of jazz, more than a few dashes of Prokofiev, and lush, inventive orchestral accompaniment.  Greilsammer plays the music quite well, displaying the traits I mentioned earlier.  There are no thundering crescendos, no dizzying flashes of brilliance.  Instead, there is control, precision, and subtle expression when playing diminuendo.  If the work doesn’t match up to Ravel qualitatively, it’s quite good nonetheless, and Greilsammer shows his stuff.

Nadia Boulanger’s 1912 Fantaise for Piano and Orchestra follows.  This live recording also appears to be a world premier recording.  The work is darker, richer, and heavier to open, with strains of late 19th Century romanticism permeating the music.  It’s hard not to hear the influence of César Franck, and the orchestration sounds a bit dense, but the work has an immediate appeal somewhat lacking in the Tansman.  The piano part is not especially dazzling and is rather formal, which may make sense given the composer.  Again, Greilsammer shows his stuff throughout, and here he generates some heat and volume when needed.

The disc closes with Rhapsody in Blue.  Greilsammer plays in more overtly virtuosic fashion here, as suits the piece, and he gracefully backs off to give the limelight to other soloists where appropriate.  The whole thing works quite well, I must say.  (Okay, this isn’t new for me, but the other works sure are.) 

So Mr Greilsammer seems like the real deal.  I see that he has another Mozart disc coming out, on Sony, this month, as well as some other discs.  I have more to hear.  Based on what I’ve heard so far, I do hope I get to hear him in Schubert and Debussy, and even Rachmaninov and Ligeti. 

Steven Sloane and the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France lend superb support for Mr Greilsammer, and sound is excellent throughout. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 16433
Re: "New" Music Log
« Reply #239 on: March 02, 2013, 01:59:10 PM »



I’m not quite sure how, but up until now I’ve never bought, nor even heard, as far as I can remember, the Violin Sonatas, even the famous Third, of George Enescu.  This is particularly odd in light of the fact that I really dig the composer’s orchestral works and his masterful opera Oedipe.  Anyway, I finally got a recording, and I must say that I am most satisfied.  The first two works are meaty, somewhat heavy, but always attractive and substantive violin sonatas.  Sort of mildly updated Brahms, which is plenty fine by me.  The great Third is, well, great.  Infused with folk and/or ethnic influences, the piece is dense, allows for virtuosic display for the violinist (especially Enescu himself, I’m guessing), is decidedly large in scale, and is immaculate in design.  I’d say it’s Brahms meets Bartok, but that’s not right at all; it’s Enescu to the core.  A most enjoyable disc, in very nice modern sound.

As good as the music is, probably the bigger thing here for me is the discovery of violinist Antal Szalai.  The young man has chops aplenty, with a big ol’ fat tone, and warmth and beauty to spare.  I looked up his recordings, and there is little else that really grabs my attention now, but if and when he records something more up my alley, I shall investigate further.  Pianist Jozsef Balog is pretty darned good, too. 
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

 

Don't Like These Ads? Become a GMG Subscriber!
For as little as 14 cents per day, subscribers get no advertising on the forum, a larger Inbox for your PM's, and a warm glow of knowing you are supporting the forum. All this and a groovy Subscriber badge too!
Click here to read more.