Author Topic: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!  (Read 22231 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7084
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #80 on: February 16, 2018, 07:31:17 AM »
I have 13 recordings of Ancidetimi pur

Thomas Schmögner - Organ (modern?)

I suppose you think of his Arte Nova recording from 1998.

He plays the organ in San Filippo in Luca. an organ built 1796 in classical ( = baroque) Italian tradition.
It is tuned meantone (1/4 komma), contains 11 stops on one manual, pedal attached without individual stops.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #81 on: February 17, 2018, 07:15:31 AM »
Why is Frescobaldi lumped in with a lot of Moderns, such as Ligeti? Is he that cool?

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10386
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #82 on: July 13, 2018, 12:46:51 PM »


Frescobaldi Aymes Capricci. Too fast and too little variation (tempo, touch, attack, rubato etc ) to do justice to the affective potential of the music. Why? He knew what Frescobaldi wanted in this respect. I think he’s bought into some theory of tactus, I’ll try to investigate it more next week. Brilliant sound and fabulous instruments, astonishing virtuosic playing. But my own leanings, my own expectations,  make it a disappointment for me.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2018, 12:49:21 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10386
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #83 on: August 03, 2018, 12:06:59 PM »
A new, revised and extended edition of Frederick Hammond’s book on Frescobaldi has now been published free and online here

http://girolamofrescobaldi.com
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 50734
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #84 on: August 04, 2018, 08:51:35 AM »
A new, revised and extended edition of Frederick Hammond’s book on Frescobaldi has now been published free and online here

http://girolamofrescobaldi.com

Splendid, thanks.

A composer friend here in Boston hates Frescobaldi;  and I just don't see how that is possible.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7084
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #85 on: August 04, 2018, 11:20:16 AM »
Splendid, thanks.

A composer friend here in Boston hates Frescobaldi;  and I just don't see how that is possible.

Twenty years ago I considered Frescobaldi a difficult accessible composer, - to day I have no problems. But I think that it isn't easy to do a convincing, integrated and coherent performance or recording of a number of the toccatas.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10386
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #86 on: August 04, 2018, 11:13:58 PM »
Hammond’s book has got me interested in De Macque and Mayone, last night I listened to Stembridge’s recording called Consonanze Stravagante - I like it very much. Some of the harmonies in the harpsichord music are really surprising (Trabaci consonanze stravaganti! )it’s clear that music in 16th and early 17th century Naples was very avant garde! I thought Hammond was  very inspiring  to read on the evolution of the toccata, in the chapter on the 1614 book.

In the chapter on the 1627 book he uses a word to describe an effect in the 6th toccata - brutal. It made me stop and think and listen, and suddenly I saw how rich the affects in the music are, or can be.

Hammond has released a number of tracks which he says is himself playing Frescobaldi, harpsichord and organ. They’re on soundcloud and you’ll find a link to them in the online book, the contents page has a link called “musical examples” They sound like very old recordings on an LP.

I’ve downloaded the book and today or tomorrow I intend to merge the pdfs and make a kindle book out of them. If anyone wants it, they’re welcome.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 11:31:42 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 50734
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #87 on: August 05, 2018, 01:56:08 AM »
I’ve downloaded the book and today or tomorrow I intend to merge the pdfs and make a kindle book out of them. If anyone wants it, they’re welcome.

Was planning on doing that, so I appreciate your doing the "heavy lifting."  Yes, please.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7084
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #88 on: August 05, 2018, 02:42:31 AM »
I’ve downloaded the book and today or tomorrow I intend to merge the pdfs and make a kindle book out of them. If anyone wants it, they’re welcome.

I can say the same as Karl, and thanks in advance.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline milk

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2636
  • Location: usa
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #89 on: August 05, 2018, 11:40:41 PM »
Hammond’s book has got me interested in De Macque and Mayone, last night I listened to Stembridge’s recording called Consonanze Stravagante - I like it very much. Some of the harmonies in the harpsichord music are really surprising (Trabaci consonanze stravaganti! )it’s clear that music in 16th and early 17th century Naples was very avant garde! I thought Hammond was  very inspiring  to read on the evolution of the toccata, in the chapter on the 1614 book.

In the chapter on the 1627 book he uses a word to describe an effect in the 6th toccata - brutal. It made me stop and think and listen, and suddenly I saw how rich the affects in the music are, or can be.

Hammond has released a number of tracks which he says is himself playing Frescobaldi, harpsichord and organ. They’re on soundcloud and you’ll find a link to them in the online book, the contents page has a link called “musical examples” They sound like very old recordings on an LP.

I’ve downloaded the book and today or tomorrow I intend to merge the pdfs and make a kindle book out of them. If anyone wants it, they’re welcome.
Definitely some weird sounds coming out of The Stenpmbridge recording. I wonder who are the modern composers most interested in late renaissance and early baroque. Maybe Cage was? I guess I should read the pdf but I also wonder about the context of this music...like, what’s different about the aim of this from the classical tradition which came after it? Is the aim of this religious or something else?

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10386
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #90 on: September 29, 2018, 06:44:24 AM »
Two essays on the Capricci, from Aymes's recording booklet

Quote
Quelques remarques sur le choix des instruments - Jean-Marc Aymes

Le Primo Libro di Capricci fait partie de la longue liste des recueils publiés en partitura, c'est-à-dire en présentant la superposition des portées, chacune de celles-ci étant consacrée uniquement à une voix. Cette présentation correspond à une écriture strictement contrapuntique, où, contrairement à ce qu'il se passe dans les toccate, par exemple, aucune note ou voix fugitivement supplémentaires ne vient s'ajouter aux voix de la polyphonie, ici au nombre de quatre.

 Reflet d'une volonté de présenter un travail axé sur la beauté du contrepoint plutôt que sur l'effet purement sensuel, pourrait-on dire, de la musique, le choix de l'instrument pour interpréter ces oeuvres reste ouvert. Bien entendu, l'orgue s'impose naturellement pour certaines pièces, comme le Capriccio XI, si l'on considère avec Etienne Darbellay (dont la préface des Capricci, dans l'édition intégrale qu'il a supervisée, reste une modèle du genre) que la fameuse quinta parte, destinée à être chantée et non jouée, correspond aux paroles lesu Redemptor Omnium.

Pour d'autres capricci, le choix est entièrement subjectif, dans la mesure, bien évidemment, où l'on se limite aux instruments que Frescobaldi pratiquait régulièrement. Il est intéressant de noter que dans le titre même du recueil, il est présenté comme « organista in San Pietro di Roma ». Mais on sait aussi qu'à cette époque, Girolamo était le professeur de clavecin certainement le plus recherché (et peut-être le mieux payé...) d'Italie.

C'est pour cela que nous avons choisi un orgue de tribune typique de ce que pouvait avoir connu notre compositeur, un clavecin de facture italienne, mais aussi un claviorganum, instrument maintenant assez bien connu. Il s'agit de l'association d'un instrument à cordes pincées et d'un petit orgue à tuyaux en bois (organo di legno) tel que le fabriquaient les Italiens. Frescobaldi a de toute évidence connu cet instrument, ne serait-ce que durant sa jeunesse à Ferrare : son maître Luzzaschi en était un virtuose reconnu.


Mais encore une fois, l'interprète, de la même manière que lorsqu'il aborde l'Art de la Fugue, se trouve devant des choix personnels. Souhaitons qu'ils correspondent à une certaine évidence, qui, de toute façon, ne sera jamais l'unique vérité. Une interprétation de ces oeuvres par un complexe instrumental (de cordes, de vents, ou 'brisé') reste par exemple à faire.

Dernière remarque : certains auditeurs seront peut-être étonnés de certains bruits parasites. Ils proviennent tous de la vie propre des instruments, craquements des peaux des soufflets de l'orgue, bruits de claviers, etc. Nous avons souhaité les laisser, dans la mesure, évidemment, où ils ne se révèlent pas une véritable gène pour l'audition de la musique, et où ils font partie d'une réalité que l'enregistre-ment discographique tend, malheureusement parfois, à policer, à uniformiser. Ce sont des bruits dont Girolamo, à sa tribune ou dans son cabinet de travail, était certainement familier.


`Capricci" Christine Jeanneret, docteure ès lettres, maître-assistante à l'Université de Genève

Une dizaine d'années après la publication du premier livre de Toccate, Frescobaldi produit un chef-d'oeuvre dans un tout autre genre, celui de la musique de style dit sévère : le Primo libro di Capricci fatti sopra diversi soggetti et arie publié en 1624. Après la virtuosité de la technique de clavier, il se tourne vers la virtuosité compositionnelle. Il s'agit d'une musique pour connaisseurs où les artifices de composition résident dans la maîtrise et l'invention contrapuntiques. Sans doute à la recherche d'un nouveau mécène, Frescobaldi dédicace l'ouvrage à Alfonso d'Este, troisième du nom. A cette époque à Rome, Girolamo ne bénéficie plus d'aucun mécénat, le cardinal Aldobrandini est mort en 1621 et il n'a pas encore de liens avec la nouvelle famille papale des Barberini. Il vit alors de son seul salaire de Saint-Pierre et des engagements extraordinaires dans différentes églises romaines ainsi que de ses leçons. Il envisage peut-être de se transférer à Modène. Qu'il s'agisse d'un artifice rhétorique ou d'un véritable attachement, il évoque dans la dédicace ses liens à sa patrie ferraraise où il a étudié avec Luzzascho Luzzaschi : «Je me suis dédié dans mes premières années à ces 'fatigues' musicales sous la discipline du Seigneur Luzzaschi, organiste si rare et serviteur si cher de la Sérénissime Maison d'Este ».

Chaque caprice est construit sur un sujet simple et distinct qui cimente la pièce d'un bout à l'autre. Il peut s'agir d'hexacordes de solmisation, ascendant pour le Capriccio primo ou descen-dant pour le Capriccio seconde ou quarto, ce dernier étant fameux depuis la messe de Josquin sur ce soggetto cavato' (Missa Lascia lare mi = la sol fa re mi). Par ailleurs, on y retrouve l'influence de Luzzaschi, qui publie des pièces similaires dans le Transilvano de Diruta (1593/1609). D'autres caprices sont construits sur des airs populaires en vogue, la Spagnoletta (Capriccio sesto), la Bassa Fiammengha, une variante de la Folia, tirée de l'air allemand Bruynsmedelijn (Capriccio quinto) ou encore l'aria Or che noi rimena, un chant d'étudiants hollandais intitulé More palatine (Capriccio settimo), qui a également inspiré Sweelinck ainsi qu'une autre pièce de Frescobaldi, l'Aria delta Balletto du second livre de Toccate (1627). Y figurent également des caprices d'inspi-ration clairement napolitaine, jouant sur les artifices contrapuntiques comme le neuvième caprice di durezze qui enchaîne les dissonances. C'est aussi le cas de deux pièces où le compositeur s'impose une contrainte externe et préalable appelée obbligo : le huitième caprice chromatique, où le défi consiste à résoudre les dissonances en montant et le onzième caprice avec l'obligation de chanter la cinquième voix, i.e. l'interprète doit résoudre une énigme consistant à introduire une cinquième voix non-écrite chaque fois que le contrepoint le lui permet.


Ces oeuvres polyphoniques complexes ne se contentent pas de suivre les conventions du gente mais font en outre des emprunts à tous les autres genres pratiqués pour le clavier à cette époque : canzone, ricercari, variations et même toccate. Ces expérimentations formelles sont typiques du style tardif de Frescobaldi, où il cherche à intégrer différents genres dans un style particulier. Cette tendance apparaît déjà dans ce volume : c'est par exemple le cas du douzième caprice, construit sur le Ruggiero, une des basses de prédilection pour les variations, mais utilisée ici comme sujet dans une pièce contrapuntique. Elle sera poussée à l'extrême par la suite, dans le deuxième volume de Toccate, mais surtout dans l'Aggiunta au premier volume (1637), avec les célèbres Cento partite, où Frescobaldi marie à grande échelle deux types de variations (chaconne et passacaille) avec une danse. On trouve également dans un manuscrit autographe inédit (Paris BNF.Rés.Vmc.64) une curieuse combinaison entre Toccata et Romanesca, qui atteste de cette recherche et expérimentation formelles.

Les capricci se caractérisent de surcroît par un travail original et très innovateur sur le tempo ; on peut même affirmer qu'ils sont à l'origine de cette notion musicale fondamentale. Frescobaldi peut en effet être considéré comme l'inventeur du tempo moderne. Dans ces œuvres, il réalise l'acrobatie mentale de combiner un système de notation mensuraliste figé du point de vue du tac-tus avec une nouvelle esthétique inspirée du style vocal libre monodique et impliquant la flexibi-lité de la battue. Déjà mentionné dans la préface du premier livre de Toccate, ce système est ici for-mulé de façon nouvelle par la combinaison des changements de proportions avec la fluctuation du Cactus. La préface contient à ce propos des indications extrêmement précieuses sur la pratique d'exécution. Une première partie fait référence à la flexibilité de la battue dans les passage en style libre, c'est-à-dire ceux qui ressemblent à des toccate :

 « On doit jouer lentement les commencements pour conférer au passage suivant plus d'animation d'agrément, et beaucoup retenir les cadences avant l'ouverture de la section suivante. [...] Dans les choses qui ne semblent pas gouvernées par l'usage du contre-point, il faut d'abord chercher l'affect du passage et l'intention du compositeur en ce qui concerne à la fois la délectation de l'oreille et la façon de jouer qu'elle implique. »

Une seconde partie explique clairement la combinaison des variations de tempo selon l'indication des proportions :

 « Dans les triples ou sesquialtere majeures [c'est-à-dire les mensurations ternaires en valeurs longues de semibrèves], on doit jouer adagio ; mineures [mensuration ternaires en valeurs plus brèves de minimes] quelque peu plus rapide ; s'il y a trois semiminimes [valeurs encore plus brèves de semiminimes], plus rapide ; s'il y en a six pour quatre [mensuration à 6/4] on mènera leur tempo d'une battue allègre »

 Il s'agit en fait pour l'exécutant de pondérer une battue flexible avec les valeurs de notes utilisées. Il faut toutefois noter qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un tempo entièrement libre, mais que les variations restent toutefois soumises aux contraintes des proportions avec comme référence la battue binaire de base.

Ce volume a subi une genèse longue et mouvementée, comme en attestent d'une part des détails philologiques des sources et d'autre part des témoignages externes. Il existe une correspondance édifiante entre Francesco Toscani, un Florentin résidant à Rome et son beau-frère musicien, Francesco Nigetti de Florence. Le premier devait envoyer des oeuvres de Frescobaldi au second. Impatient d'obtenir les capricci en préparation, il a dû ronger son frein pendant plus d'un an, comme en témoignent une dizaine de lettres rédigées entre octobre 1623 et juillet 1625, dans lesquelles est évoquée la publication toujours retardée des Capricci, car Frescobaldi « est un homme si long en affaires, que vous ne le pourrez croire [...] j'ai attendu deux heures chez lui pendant qu'il recorri-geait [le volume des Capricci] comme vous le verrez, car l'imprimé a quelques erreurs, désormais corrigées ». En effet, le recueil présente plusieurs curieux problèmes de pagination, signatures et fasciculation, qui sont les indices de remaniements intempestifs. Frescobaldi était l'homme de la dernière minute, modifiant et retravaillant constamment ses oeuvres, avant de les donner à imprimer, mais aussi pendant le processus d'impression et même une fois que le volume était sorti de presse.

L'étude des rares témoignages manuscrits qui nous sont parvenus confirme cette méthode compositionnelle. Le troisième caprice sur le coucou est le seul à présenter une concordance avec le répertoire manuscrit. La version manuscrite (Rome, Bibliothèque Apostolique Vaticane, ms Chigi Q.IV.25) est nettement moins élaborée que la version imprimée. Il s'agit d'une simple pièce sectionnelle, sans le profond travail d'intégration réalisé dans la version imprimée. Les valeurs et les échelles temporelles sont de convenance, sans les combinaisons complexes de mensuration évoquées dans la préface. C'est clairement une version préliminaire, qui nous permet de compren-dre que la fonction du manuscrit était de servir de support à la mémoire, comme un réservoir d'idées formé de courtes pièces terminées, harmonisées, mais construites de façon rudimentaires. Elles seront développées à grande échelle, complexifiées du point de vue de la construction formelle et des indications de mensuration par intégration de différents blocs de composition combinés dans une grande forme, mêlant les genres et les proportions. Dans ce sens, le manuscrit nous offre un regard privilégié dans l'atelier mental de composition de Frescobaldi et nous permet de mesurer le chemin parcouru jusqu'à la version définitive.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 10386
Re: Frescobaldi, Girolamo - Italian Keyboard Pioneer!
« Reply #91 on: November 03, 2018, 12:02:14 AM »
A lecture on Frescobaldi by Richard Lester

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/KhxUgue95ig" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/KhxUgue95ig</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/3cZRTy5NxFs" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/3cZRTy5NxFs</a>

In the first video he talks about the necessity for using a split keys in the cento partite to avoid dissonance. It's interesting how attitudes to dissonance are so divided, if you contrast Egarr's attitude to dissonance in Byrd in his new CD. I think you can acquire a taste for tones that Lester would think of as problematic, and, from my point of view, Lester's attitude to tonality is doctrinaire.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2018, 12:48:33 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen