Author Topic: Dvorak's Symphonies  (Read 18545 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mc ukrneal

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7860
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #160 on: January 09, 2017, 08:22:13 PM »
Thank you. I seem to be one of the few here who love all the early symphonies as much as the late ones.

Sarge
Me too. I actually listen to the early ones periodically. I rarely listen to the later ones, though I have a soft spot for #6.
Offenbach gets a raw deal in recordings considering his talent! For a discussion of this outstanding composer too little recorded: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,5572.

Offline amw

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2363
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #161 on: January 09, 2017, 08:24:46 PM »
I haven't done any comparison of Kertesz and Rowicki, apart from that I like both of them (and also Neumann, whom I like as well. And Bělohlávek. Like him too.)

7th, 6th, 5th and 8th are my favourites. Second place goes to the 3rd, 4th, 2nd, 1st and 9th. Third through ninth places are empty.

Offline aukhawk

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 509
  • Frankie
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #162 on: January 11, 2017, 03:13:27 AM »
Well unlike most of you I'll be willing to give the "obscure" symphonies a good hearing, and as good a chance as they deserve to seep into my memory. Very often all music needs to be appreciated is repeated hearings; not giving up if, after one or two goes, it doesn't reveal all its secrets.

It seems to me that when Dvorak was writing and publishing his music, his target audience didn't usually have the luxury of repeated listenings.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 38392
  • Charles Ives (1874 - 1954)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The sound of rag-time dances in a New England town square
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #163 on: January 11, 2017, 09:28:29 AM »
I've got Neumann (older cycle) and Kertesz, which I really enjoy. I never really felt the need to own another cycle and that's because my dad owns the rest of them. ;D
"There is a great Man living in this Country – a composer. He has solved the problem how to preserve one's self-esteem and to learn. He responds to negligence by contempt. He is not forced to accept praise or blame. His name is Ives.” - Schoenberg on Ives

Offline André

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2474
  • Location: Laval, QC
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #164 on: January 11, 2017, 03:09:42 PM »
I like Kertesz' big and beefy Dvorak. I also like Kosler's lean and lilting view (symphonies 1-7). Suitner is a splendid alternative, beautifully played and recorded. IMHO all of these capture the essence of the music better than Kubelik, who had so many gos at them that he shoud be judjed accordingly.

When it's all said and done, no Dvorak cycle can claim to be "best" at all nine symphonies. Personally I mildly appreciate 1-3. My ears perk up substantially at # 4. And from the 5th to the end it's "Glory be" to whoever does justice to these wonderful scores.

- 4: Neumann, Suitner
- 5: Neumann and Kertesz
- 6 - Ancerl, Neumann, Sejna, Talich (the latter two in inferior sound)
- 7 - Kosler, Davis RCOA, Kertesz, Sejna, Szell.
- 8 and 9: just too many to choose from. For these two the folk/dance elements are more or less internationalized and have for many decades become the province of all great conductors.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

  • Full Member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 632
  • Back. Hello!
    • Surprised by Beauty
  • Currently Listening to:
    anything from Monteverdi to Widmann and well beyond in either direction and everything in the middle!
Re: Dvorak's Symphonies
« Reply #165 on: January 14, 2017, 05:17:50 AM »




A Survey of Dvořák Symphony Cycles


I've recently gotten one cycle that I had always speculated about (if not outright felt that I needed it): Kubelik's.
But seeing that there is now a European/Eloquence box available that a.) includes all his DG Dvorak, b.) gives us - for the first time ever! - all symphonies on one CD, instead of breaking the 5th (was it?) into two, and c.) looks good and is nicely space-saving, I snapped it up. I haven't listened to enough of it to suggest that it will be a particular favorite here or there (as mentioned elsewhere here, I'm a fan of Rowicki and some of Neumann's 70s cycle), but it felt like filling a small gap. :-)

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK