Author Topic: Sviatoslav Richter  (Read 145647 times)

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Drasko

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #220 on: December 10, 2008, 04:54:23 PM »
How about this one? Which of the two complete versions does it correspond to?





(It seems to be a recent release.)

http://www.hmv.co.jp/product/detail/316466

OK, here's the listing from the Trovar site:

Well-Tempered Clavier, books I & II
(Salzburg and Vienna, 1970 - 1973)

Le Chant du Monde LDX 78 525/30 (LP)
Melodiya/Eurodisc 610 276 (LP) [ Ariola 610 276-234 ]
Melodiya/Eurodisc [Germany] 610 276-234 (CD)
Melodiya / JVC VICC 40014-17 (CD) or VICC 40206-9
Victor [ Japan ] VICC 40210 - 40213 (CD)
RCA GD 60949 (CD)
RCA [Japan] BVCC 37139/42 (CD)
Olympia [Russia] 501077 A+B (CD) & 501078 A+B (CD)

Offline Renfield

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #221 on: December 10, 2008, 05:23:25 PM »
Right, just wanted to confirm. Thanks, Drasko.
"If they know what to do, they will do it themselves: don't disturb it." - Herbert von Karajan, Kapellmeister

"when it is truly time [...] it will do it by itself and it will keep on doing it until you die or it dies in you." - H. C. Bukowski

And the world is still everything that is the case.

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #222 on: January 11, 2009, 04:34:04 PM »
As promised to donwyn last night here are my impressions of this Doremi set. Where it says first release ever, it means for this performance of this work.



SCHUBERT: Sonata No.9 in B, D.575  First release ever.
BRAHMS: Ballades Op.10/1,2; Piano Pieces, Op.118/1,3,6  First release ever.
CHOPIN: 4 Scherzos: Op.20, Op.31, Op.39, Op.54 (only released before on Doremi)
RAVEL: Oiseaux triste from Miroirs First release ever.
RACHMANINOFF: Prelude, Op.32/12; Etude Tableau, Op.39/3,9 First release ever
All performances listed above from an audience recording from Carnegie Hall, New York, April 15, 1965

SCHUBERT: Sonata No.3 in E, D.459  First release ever. The only version by Richter known to be recorded. From a Live Performance, Hohenems, June 18, 1980
SCHUBERT: Two Impromptus, D.899/3,4  First release ever. (Trovar lists no other performance of No. 3) From a Live Performance, Budapest, August 27, 1967
SCHUBERT: Moment Musical No.1 in C, D.780/1  First release ever. From a Live Performance, Budapest, February 11, 1958
SCHUBERT: March in E, D.606 First release ever. The only version by Richter known to be recorded. From a Live Performance, Moscow, May 3, 1978


Disc one begins with a Schubert sonata that has not been previously released by the pianist, the D 459. That was the main reason I bought this set, it contains a few unique Schubert works that had previously unreleased in any performance by the pianist. The sound was unfortunately a letdown immediately, as the high frequencies are drastically cut. Some of this can be remedied with the treble control, but IMO this is a shame and since the rest of the disc does not suffer this problem, it's puzzling why this one does. The performance was enjoyable, but this isn't one of those monumental Richter interpretations that Richerphiles dream of. Richter sounds younger, more playful than he usually is in Schubert. It is fitting here and he turns in a good performance.

Then we move to the audience recorded Carnegie Hall recital, recorded 15 years prior. Richter's powerful, urgent style is here in spades and so is the upper frequencies in another Schubert sonata performance. The audience recorded sound limits the bass response and the fortes are harsh, but all notes played are clearly audible. Richter's tone shines in many sections, though the health of the audience was terrible, with coughing almost a constant issue throughout.

We then move to the 4 Chopin Scherzos from the same venue, which had been previously released on Doremi, but were included here because a better recording was found of the performance. Richter is electrifying in the fast sections of the Scherzos, with an urgency and forward momentum that I have never heard in these works before. The slower, quieter sections are tender and beautiful. The Ravel that follows is a great complement, with a quiet, mysterious dark mood that is conveyed masterfully. The Rachmaninoff works are good, but surely not his best. Not the wisest was to end this concert.

Then comes some extra performances from different places, beginning with an absolutely stunning G flat Impromptu by Schubert. Trovar does not list any released performances by the pianist of this work, making this one that much more special. Played a bit slower than I have heard it played by anyone, this one (together with the Scherzos) made buying this set worthwhile. The A flat Impromptu by the same composer that follows was good, but certainly not in the same league as the G flat, nor was the Moment Musical or the March in E, which had not been released before by the pianist.     

So this one is a mixed bag, as you may have gathered already. For the Scherzos and the G flat Impromptu, this would be a no brainer for any Richterphile, but the price is pretty steep. As I have said, the overall sound is fair at best, so all things considered, I'd say that this set is for the most devoted fans of the pianist only, a group that is not small in number and probably doesn't need my urging anyway.

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #223 on: January 11, 2009, 04:55:09 PM »


Can you tell me where you got this one, Don?

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #224 on: January 11, 2009, 05:07:24 PM »
I saw these Richter/Supraphon titles in HMV yesterday. Not aware of them, are they new additions to the Richter catalogue? Anyone heard them?





The one on the left has poor sound, weird modern mastering stuff was done to it, damaging the piano tone. The live Fantasy is unique to this release, so you might still want it for that, but for the rest the one to have is a DG CD I got off of amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00000E53F I t was released at least twice. The one pictured at amazon is the newer one.



435751 is the catalog number of the older pressing (above) and it's well worth finding.

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #225 on: January 11, 2009, 10:31:54 PM »
Can you tell me where you got this one, Don?

I snatched it off Amazon Marketplace. It was one of those luck purchases where the seller - not knowing what he/she had - had totally under-priced the disc. Got it for less than twenty dollars used but in absolute mint condition.

Last I checked it's now going for something like $125. I count myself VERY lucky to have found this one cheap.

It's a dynamite performance, too - or I should say, dreamily poetic, which is more in keeping with the style/mood of the piece.

It's one of the top Schubert performances I'm lucky enough to own.

*And thanks for the writeup of the Doremi disc, George!* :)

"I've grown used to this country and I love it. But there's one thing it doesn't have - quiet". Rachmaninoff musing on his hectic schedule in the USA.

Offline dirkronk

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #226 on: January 14, 2009, 01:06:09 PM »
Thanks for the review of the Doremi 1965 Carnegie release, George. This period of Richter's performance has always frustrated me, in part because of all the apparently-spurious releases on odd little labels that used to come out. There was a single CD that I heard back around 2000 or 2001 that claimed to be of Richter at Carnegie in 1965--BUT I had my doubts that it was the genuine article. Initially, I was curious about it since it included some Beethoven sonata--I THINK it was another Appassionata, but don't recall for certain (I was really into hunting down all of Richter's versions of that work at the time, and IIRC his "official" discographies listed only one or two recordings of the piece after the early 1960s). Whatever it was, I listened with eager anticipation BUT the recording was so awful that it made listening virtually impossible. It featured some of the most dreadful, wavery, distant sonics I've ever heard on any commercial release, as though copied from a stretched or otherwise damaged tape. Thus I left it alone and haven't seen another copy of it since.

Obviously, this new release is a different kettle of fish altogether. I'll be adding it to my want list.

I'd love to see a full list of the programs Richter played on his US tour that year, though, to see if that earlier CD might in fact have been a genuine if poorly produced Richter performance.

Dirk

Offline Holden

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #227 on: January 15, 2009, 12:05:01 AM »
Thanks for the review of the Doremi 1965 Carnegie release, George. This period of Richter's performance has always frustrated me, in part because of all the apparently-spurious releases on odd little labels that used to come out. There was a single CD that I heard back around 2000 or 2001 that claimed to be of Richter at Carnegie in 1965--BUT I had my doubts that it was the genuine article. Initially, I was curious about it since it included some Beethoven sonata--I THINK it was another Appassionata, but don't recall for certain (I was really into hunting down all of Richter's versions of that work at the time, and IIRC his "official" discographies listed only one or two recordings of the piece after the early 1960s). Whatever it was, I listened with eager anticipation BUT the recording was so awful that it made listening virtually impossible. It featured some of the most dreadful, wavery, distant sonics I've ever heard on any commercial release, as though copied from a stretched or otherwise damaged tape. Thus I left it alone and haven't seen another copy of it since.

Obviously, this new release is a different kettle of fish altogether. I'll be adding it to my want list.

I'd love to see a full list of the programs Richter played on his US tour that year, though, to see if that earlier CD might in fact have been a genuine if poorly produced Richter performance.

Dirk

Dirk, Bruno Monsaingeon's bio of Richter "Notebooks and Conversations" gives a fairly extensive record of his concert repertoire and lists dates of recordings. I don't have it (but my library does) so I'll get it and check it out.

IIRC, there are only 7 Richter recordings of Op 57. One in Prague '59, one in Kiev '59  one from Moscow in 1960, two in NY '60, and two in Holland in '92. I have four of those but don't have the Kiev - maybe this is the one you are referring to that has the bad sound. The Eindhoven and Amsterdam recordings are not worth getting IMO.
Cheers

Holden

Offline dirkronk

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #228 on: January 15, 2009, 05:59:47 AM »
(1) Dirk, Bruno Monsaingeon's bio of Richter "Notebooks and Conversations" gives a fairly extensive record of his concert repertoire and lists dates of recordings. I don't have it (but my library does) so I'll get it and check it out.

(2) IIRC, there are only 7 Richter recordings of Op 57. One in Prague '59, one in Kiev '59  one from Moscow in 1960, two in NY '60, and two in Holland in '92. I have four of those but don't have the Kiev - maybe this is the one you are referring to that has the bad sound. The Eindhoven and Amsterdam recordings are not worth getting IMO.

(1) Thanks, Ric!

(2) Yeah, I have the same four you have (as you know) but still haven't located/listened to the Kiev either...yet. I suppose that COULD be the performance I heard, but since I didn't just buy that old "Carnegie 1965" CD when I originally saw it, I'll never know. Keep in mind too that my remembering the piece as "possibly" being the Appassionata could be totally wrong; I just know it was a Beethoven sonata of some kind--and at the time I was specifically looking for a CD transfer of the October 1960 Carnegie performance, as we've discussed often in the past. The late Dutch performances I haven't heard either, save for a very brief snippet in a music store years back, but your evaluation is the same as others I've read and heard--so I'm still not rushing to locate and order those.
 ;D

Cheers,

Dirk

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #229 on: January 15, 2009, 09:06:00 AM »
...but still haven't located/listened to the Kiev either...yet.

Dirk, the Kiev Appassionata can be found on TNC. Look here. Unfortunately I don't own anything from this box set.   

About the sound: all I can attest to is what I could glean from the few clips I downloaded and burned (mp3s). The sound - probably as expected - it is rough and somewhat dim. No doubt audience-based. Not the absolute worst I've heard but not the best, either.


"I've grown used to this country and I love it. But there's one thing it doesn't have - quiet". Rachmaninoff musing on his hectic schedule in the USA.

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #230 on: January 15, 2009, 06:35:18 PM »
Dirk, Bruno Monsaingeon's bio of Richter "Notebooks and Conversations" gives a fairly extensive record of his concert repertoire and lists dates of recordings. I don't have it (but my library does) so I'll get it and check it out.

Holden,

As far as pinpointing exact recording dates/concerts, sadly Notebooks isn't that comprehensive. One of the indexes includes a tally of performances by decade but no individual dates or places.

A good portion of the book is taken from Richter's private 'notebooks' in which he'd jotted down thoughts on either performances he'd attended (concert, opera, even jazz) or recordings he (and sometimes friends) had listened to. But only about half (maybe less) of the 'notes' deal with his own recordings. But this half is in no way comprehensive and isn't intended as a reference. It's just a snapshot of a day in the life of a pianist and what he sometimes did in his leisure time. And the number of his own recordings he touches on really only amounts to a trickle, comparatively speaking. Also, nowhere in the 'notes' does he make mention of his own concerts. Only recordings.

Anyway, I hate to rain on the parade but as good a read as Notebooks is (it's fascinating) it's more of a peek into Richter's private life than anything. Encyclopedic reference guide for recordings/concerts it isn't. Alas...


"I've grown used to this country and I love it. But there's one thing it doesn't have - quiet". Rachmaninoff musing on his hectic schedule in the USA.

Offline Holden

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #231 on: January 16, 2009, 12:17:37 PM »
Looks like I need to get it out from the library again - ah, memory, such an elusive thing nowadays!
Cheers

Holden

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #232 on: January 16, 2009, 05:43:03 PM »
... - ah, memory, such an elusive thing nowadays!

Same here. Lucky for me I just recently reread portions of the book, otherwise I wouldn't have had a clue.


"I've grown used to this country and I love it. But there's one thing it doesn't have - quiet". Rachmaninoff musing on his hectic schedule in the USA.

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #233 on: January 17, 2009, 08:54:09 AM »
I had created a list of my most favorite Richter recordings for a friend on another board. Since rickardg asked for suggestions as well, I decided to post it here:

Prokofiev Piano Sonatas 6-8, Sofia Recital - Great Pianists of the Century or get the Sofia Reciatl separately on Philips, but the Prokofiev is not to be missed.

Beethoven Sonatas Pathetique and Appassionata, Bagatelles and Choral Fantasy on Melodiya (THE best Beethoven disc Richter has put out)

Beethoven Sonatas 109 -111 "Live at Leipzig" on Parnassus

Rachmaninoff PC 2 and Prokofiev PC 5 on DG (somewhat better sound than the one with the Tchaikovsky coupling)

Rachmaninoff Preludes and Etudes on Regis or Olympia

Schubert D 958 and D 960 on Regis or Olympia

Liszt Piano Concertos cond by Kondrashin on Philips (not the 50 best recordings one, the one with a picture of Liszt on the (red and white) cover) Cheap over at amazon

Schumann Fantasy in C on Various EMI CDs

Schumann Waldszenen, 6 Fantasiestucke, Toccata, Novellette, Marsch on DG (not the Supraphon as the sound is not as good)

Bach WTC Live at Innsbruck on Victor or the much easier to find RCA Salzburg version where the performance is still very good, but the sound is over-reverberant

Debussy Preludes complete on BBC Legends

Chopin/Scriabin on Praga and any other Richter Praga CDs you can get including the whole set (very expensive), the cover is my avatar!

Sviatoslav Richter in Concert - Box set on Brilliant Classics (for the greatest Schubert D 894 ever!)

Also, any Schubert by the pianist, it's all great!

Any recording made prior to 1970 is excellent, 1970-1980 you need to cherry pick, after 1980 be even more selective.

Offline Opus106

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #234 on: January 17, 2009, 09:52:22 AM »
Bach WTC Live at Innsbruck on Victor

Live? Do you mean to say that this is a recording of the 48 in one sitting?
Regards,
Navneeth

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #235 on: January 17, 2009, 11:52:00 AM »
Live? Do you mean to say that this is a recording of the 48 in one sitting?

That is my understanding. Perhaps an intermission or two.

Offline Holden

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #236 on: January 17, 2009, 01:30:38 PM »
Richter went through a period where he would programme an all Bach recital and this included the WTC. Maybe he did it over two concerts - George will have the details on the CD insert.
Cheers

Holden

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #237 on: January 17, 2009, 01:34:15 PM »
Maybe he did it over two concerts - George will have the details on the CD insert.

Yes, it says - August 7 and 10, 1973 - Insbruck.

ezodisy

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #238 on: January 17, 2009, 01:57:45 PM »
Quote
Schubert D 958...Olympia

The 958 from Budapest on M&A is the one to have

« Last Edit: January 18, 2009, 05:47:56 AM by Que »

George

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Re: Sviatoslav Richter
« Reply #239 on: January 17, 2009, 02:10:19 PM »
Thanks for the review of the Doremi 1965 Carnegie release, George.

Your welcome!  :)

Sent you a PM earlier in the week, BTW.

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