Author Topic: Sir William Walton  (Read 37915 times)

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Offline cilgwyn

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #160 on: December 17, 2016, 04:43:34 AM »
Actually,The Waps is placed second on the cd. It shows how long it's been since I last played it. It's not much cop for VW! You get the second symphony as well on the emi cd,which I've been playing. I think I'll skip the Previn cd,anyway! I love those whoops from the horns in the Second symphony. Thrilling!I suppose,one problem with Walton is you can't go on a symphony cycle binge like you can with VW or Bax? Still,that's what he wrote! Listening to the Veale now,with my previous comments in mind,I can't help wishing it had been an all Veale cd. Dutton have a thing about coupling different composers. I prefer one composer to one cd,with certain exceptions. One reason why I never bought the Lyrita cd of Brian symphonies and downloaded instead. But there's me being ungrateful!! ::) ;D

NB: I typed 'The Waps' by mistake. I usually try and correct mistakes in my posts;but I quite like that one,so I'm leaving it. The Waps Overture by Vaughan Williams!! ;D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #161 on: December 17, 2016, 11:45:32 PM »
Actually,The Waps is placed second on the cd. It shows how long it's been since I last played it. It's not much cop for VW! You get the second symphony as well on the emi cd,which I've been playing. I think I'll skip the Previn cd,anyway! I love those whoops from the horns in the Second symphony. Thrilling!I suppose,one problem with Walton is you can't go on a symphony cycle binge like you can with VW or Bax? Still,that's what he wrote! Listening to the Veale now,with my previous comments in mind,I can't help wishing it had been an all Veale cd. Dutton have a thing about coupling different composers. I prefer one composer to one cd,with certain exceptions. One reason why I never bought the Lyrita cd of Brian symphonies and downloaded instead. But there's me being ungrateful!! ::) ;D

NB: I typed 'The Waps' by mistake. I usually try and correct mistakes in my posts;but I quite like that one,so I'm leaving it. The Waps Overture by Vaughan Williams!! ;D
I didn't notice the typo. There is a debate as to whether the final movement of Symphony 1 is as good as the other three movements as it was composed later. I think that it works very well and actually I don't think that any of the movements are as good as the first movement which is a symphony in itself. I find the slow movement of Symphony 2 more moving than the one for Symphony 1. I am getting to like Symphony 2 much more although No.1 is Walton's masterpiece. I have every recording often in multiple copies.  ::)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Ken B

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #162 on: December 18, 2016, 09:00:38 AM »
I didn't notice the typo. There is a debate as to whether the final movement of Symphony 1 is as good as the other three movements as it was composed later. I think that it works very well and actually I don't think that any of the movements are as good as the first movement which is a symphony in itself. I find the slow movement of Symphony 2 more moving than the one for Symphony 1. I am getting to like Symphony 2 much more although No.1 is Walton's masterpiece. I have every recording often in multiple copies.  ::)

To me the first movement is as good as anything any Brit ever wrote and the fourth movement is a let down.
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #163 on: December 18, 2016, 10:13:58 AM »
To me the first movement is as good as anything any Brit ever wrote and the fourth movement is a let down.
I very much agree with you about the first movement. The end of the symphony is clearly influenced, as is Moeran's fine Symphony, by Sibelius's 5th Symphony with its spaced out explosive chords but I still think that it works well in the overall conception.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #164 on: December 18, 2016, 11:20:49 AM »
From what I remember reading, Walton struggled with the completion of the last movement of Symphony No. 1. It does come across as sounding a bit 'forced' if this would be the correct adjective to use. Overall, though, it's an enjoyable symphony. I never thought the slow movement, Andante con malinconia was very memorable. I suppose I was expecting a bit something more somber and anguished.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #165 on: December 18, 2016, 11:24:38 AM »
From what I remember reading, Walton struggled with the completion of the last movement of Symphony No. 1. It does come across as sounding a bit 'forced' if this would be the correct adjective to use. Overall, though, it's an enjoyable symphony. I never thought the slow movement, Andante con malinconia was very memorable. I suppose I was expecting a bit something more somber and anguished.
I agree about the slow movement John - I prefer the one in the underrated Second Symphony.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #166 on: January 20, 2017, 07:40:06 AM »
I have to say that given cilgwyn's more recent enthusiasm for Walton, I should probably do a bit more listening on my part to see if the opinion I gave earlier still holds any water.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #167 on: January 20, 2017, 12:04:37 PM »
Recently I went on a conductor binge on YouTube, in this case it was Horenstein, that sadly neglected genius of a conductor. I listened to him conducting all sorts of stuff I wouldn't normally listen to (stuff I don't like, but which he made sound much better). Walton of course I do like, and H's recording of Walton's first symphony is outstanding, makes it sound like a piece you've never heard before.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #168 on: January 20, 2017, 12:07:44 PM »
Recently I went on a conductor binge on YouTube, in this case it was Horenstein, that sadly neglected genius of a conductor. I listened to him conducting all sorts of stuff I wouldn't normally listen to (stuff I don't like, but which he made sound much better). Walton of course I do like, and H's recording of Walton's first symphony is outstanding, makes it sound like a piece you've never heard before.
Horenstein was a great conductor. At the age of 16 I heard him conduct Bruckner's 8th Symphony in London. A magnificent performance which was recorded on disc (Vox/Turnabout).
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #169 on: February 06, 2017, 03:06:50 PM »
This may surprise some...

Cross-posted from the 'Purchases' thread -

Just paid a pretty penny for this rare, OOP set, but I only owned a few single issues from it and the ones I've heard are absolutely smashing:



Probably the last anything I buy of Walton. Looking forward to digging into this set. Also, the fact that I bought this set brand new is quite a find.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #170 on: February 06, 2017, 11:29:18 PM »
This may surprise some...

Cross-posted from the 'Purchases' thread -
You have many hours of listening pleasure ahead of you with that set!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

PerfectWagnerite

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #171 on: May 04, 2017, 11:55:11 AM »
Today I listened to the Violin Concerto with Heifetz as soloist and the composer conducting. If there is ever such a thing as definitive this is it guys. I don't even know how soloists record something like this when there is something like this in the catalogue.

Also just found out that the Viola Concerto was premiered with Paul Hindemith as soloist ! Talk about greatness performing greatness !

Offline listener

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #172 on: May 04, 2017, 03:30:24 PM »
James Ehnes  played the viola concerto in Vancouver last week.  A comment
" After a finely-judged and moving epilogue, I firmly felt that there have been few performances of the work that combine the poise, strength and feeling contained in this one. Ehnes will make a recording with Edward Gardner in June of this year."     There are two versions, the original and a revised and shortened one, Ehnes plays the later one that has clearer orchestration.
He did not know what else would be on the disc, only that it would be part of a series.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #173 on: May 04, 2017, 05:06:10 PM »
I prefer the lesser-known Viola Concerto to the better known Violin Concerto. Good to hear that the former was played in Vancouver. It is IMHO one of Walton's very greatest works and my favourite Viola Concerto.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

PerfectWagnerite

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #174 on: May 04, 2017, 05:31:42 PM »
James Ehnes  played the viola concerto in Vancouver last week.  A comment
" After a finely-judged and moving epilogue, I firmly felt that there have been few performances of the work that combine the poise, strength and feeling contained in this one. Ehnes will make a recording with Edward Gardner in June of this year."     There are two versions, the original and a revised and shortened one, Ehnes plays the later one that has clearer orchestration.
He did not know what else would be on the disc, only that it would be part of a series.
he has already recorded the violin cto with the same orch

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #175 on: August 13, 2017, 11:14:22 AM »
Wooh! ??? This is a powerful performance of Walton's First! Great to have both symphonies on one cd. Not that this is the only time it's been done!! I bought this cd,a while back,after reading a post by vandermolen (I think)?




Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #176 on: August 13, 2017, 10:14:53 PM »
Wooh! ??? This is a powerful performance of Walton's First! Great to have both symphonies on one cd. Not that this is the only time it's been done!! I bought this cd,a while back,after reading a post by vandermolen (I think)?


One of the great Walton CDs I think. Sargent was, I think, rather underrated as a conductor. I actually prefer Sargent's recording of Walton's First Symphony to the Previn version on RCA which is usually regarded as the No.1 choice. I actually prefer Previn's later RPO version. There is more tension at the start of the Sargent performance than is the case with Previn, a conductor I greatly admire.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #177 on: August 18, 2017, 06:54:21 PM »
Revisiting the thunderous and marvelous Symphony No. 1 in B flat minor, playing a remarkable recording: rendition by Haitink-Philharmonia Orchestra, it's definitely an English blockbuster of epic and glorious English lands, an ode to the majestic material of life (e.g. Respighi Church Windows, Barber Second Essay for orchestra, Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11 The Year 1905, Prokofiev Alexander Nevsky, Novák Toman and the Wood Nymph, Khachaturian's Symphony No. 2 The Bells, Tchaikovsky The Voyevode, Rimsky-Korsakov's Schéhérezade, Nielsen Symphony No. 5, op. 50, Tubin Symphony No. 5 in B minor, Ivanovs' Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Atlantis, Melartin - Symphony No. 3, Glière - Symphony No. 3, Braga Santos - Symphony No. 4, Hanson's Sympnony No. 2 Romantic, Franck Le Chasseur Maudit, Wagner Parsifal, Strauss Eine alpensinfonie, Moeran Symphony [nr. 1) in G minor,, Miaskovsky Symphony 17 in G-sharp minor, op. 41, Janácek Taras Bulba, Holst The Planets, op. 32,  ) and so on... (almost all that was symphonies, I suspect I like symphonies  0:)  >:D  :P  ??? ) (you know what I mean :D ):

a banquet of explossive ideas and luminous fellings about life, about to be proud of belonging a nation, about the sweet and powerful, the both good and bad things in every life, about love and hate, about happyness and sadness...

in a few words: a musical orgasm!!  :D  ???  :-[  :'( :blank: ()

Absolutely epic!!!!!
« Last Edit: August 18, 2017, 07:06:04 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #178 on: August 18, 2017, 09:13:56 PM »
Revisiting the thunderous and marvelous Symphony No. 1 in B flat minor, playing a remarkable recording: rendition by Haitink-Philharmonia Orchestra, it's definitely an English blockbuster of epic and glorious English lands, an ode to the majestic material of life (e.g. Respighi Church Windows, Barber Second Essay for orchestra, Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11 The Year 1905, Prokofiev Alexander Nevsky, Novák Toman and the Wood Nymph, Khachaturian's Symphony No. 2 The Bells, Tchaikovsky The Voyevode, Rimsky-Korsakov's Schéhérezade, Nielsen Symphony No. 5, op. 50, Tubin Symphony No. 5 in B minor, Ivanovs' Symphony No. 4 in E-flat Atlantis, Melartin - Symphony No. 3, Glière - Symphony No. 3, Braga Santos - Symphony No. 4, Hanson's Sympnony No. 2 Romantic, Franck Le Chasseur Maudit, Wagner Parsifal, Strauss Eine alpensinfonie, Moeran Symphony [nr. 1) in G minor,, Miaskovsky Symphony 17 in G-sharp minor, op. 41, Janácek Taras Bulba, Holst The Planets, op. 32,  ) and so on... (almost all that was symphonies, I suspect I like symphonies  0:)  >:D  :P  ??? ) (you know what I mean :D ):

a banquet of explossive ideas and luminous fellings about life, about to be proud of belonging a nation, about the sweet and powerful, the both good and bad things in every life, about love and hate, about happyness and sadness...

in a few words: a musical orgasm!!  :D  ???  :-[  :'( :blank: ()

Absolutely epic!!!!!
I share your views on nearly all those works and am encouraged to listen to the Novak again. For my brother the Walton is about despair turning to defiance and I like that analysis. It remains one of the greatest British symphonies along IMHO opinion with the two (or three) by Elgar, Vaughan Williams's 4-6,Bax Nos.3 and 5,Arnold No.5, Moeran's Symphony, Rubbra's No.4 and 1 and 8 by Havergal Brian.
Haitink's recording is an epic performance of an epic symphony.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Christo

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Re: Sir William Walton
« Reply #179 on: August 19, 2017, 10:43:17 AM »
I share your views on nearly all those works
Me too, am even a bit shocked to see this list.  ???
Happily, there are some differences, caused no doubt by different listening experiences; namely:
1. I love Respighi, especially his later pieces, but found the Vetrate a bit bombastic at first hearing (comparable to other war horses like the Pini and Feste Romane) and never played much attention to it since then; my Respighi favourites are the Fontane, Trittico botticelliano, Lauda per la nativitá del Signore, Metamorphoseon Modi XII, Belfagor Overture, Concerto gregoriano, La Primavera, Ciaccona, Antiche danze ed arie per liuto III, Maria egiziaca. Tell me: what am I missing (nodding at Jeffrey too: yes, it must be completely my fault).
2. The same with Tubin: find his symphonies one of the finest cycles that I know and love them dearly; but almost all more so than the trepid Fifth (that I even heard live, in Utrecht, just as I heard the Sixth and (unfinished) Eleventh in the Amsterdam Concertgebouw. Why not 4, 6, or 8?  ;)
3. For me, Miaskovsky is No. 6 and No. 27. Please tell me more about No. 17.
4. Franck, really?  :D
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948